2016 Formula One season

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2016 FIA Formula One
World Championship
Previous: 2015 Next: 2017
Support series:
Nico Rosberg, the current World Drivers' Championship leader
Mercedes is the defending World Constructors' Champion and current championship leader.

The 2016 Formula One season is the 67th season of the FIA Formula One World Championship, a motor racing championship for Formula One cars which is recognised by the sport's governing body, the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), as the highest class of competition for open-wheel racing cars. Teams and drivers are scheduled to take part in twenty-one Grands Prix—making for the longest season in the sport's history—starting in Australia on 20 March and finishing in Abu Dhabi on 27 November as they compete for the World Drivers' and World Constructors' championships.[1]

The 2016 season saw the grid expand to twenty-two cars with the addition of the Haas F1 Team entry.[2] Renault returned to the sport as a constructor after a four-year absence following their takeover of Lotus prior to the start of the season.[3] The calendar has similarly expanded, with the return of the German Grand Prix. The European Grand Prix will also be revived, with the event visiting a new circuit in Azerbaijan.[1]

Lewis Hamilton started the season as the defending Drivers' Champion for the second year running, after winning his third World Championship title at the 2015 United States Grand Prix.[4] His team, Mercedes, started the season as the defending Constructors' Champion, having secured its second championship title at the 2015 Russian Grand Prix.[5] After six races, Nico Rosberg leads the Drivers' Championship by 24 points over Mercedes team-mate Lewis Hamilton while Mercedes lead the Constructors' standings.

Signed teams and drivers

The following teams and drivers are currently taking part in the 2016 Formula One World Championship:

Entrant Constructor Chassis Power unit Tyre No. Race drivers Rounds No. Free practice drivers
Italy Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari SF16-H Ferrari 059/5[6] P 5 Germany Sebastian Vettel 1–6 N/A
7 Finland Kimi Räikkönen 1–6
India Sahara Force India Formula One Team[3] Force India-Mercedes VJM09 Mercedes PU106C Hybrid[7] P 11 Mexico Sergio Pérez 1–6 34 Mexico Alfonso Celis, Jr.
27 Germany Nico Hülkenberg 1–6
United States Haas F1 Team Haas-Ferrari VF-16 Ferrari 059/5[6] P 8 France Romain Grosjean 1–6 N/A
21 Mexico Esteban Gutiérrez 1–6
United Kingdom McLaren Honda Formula 1 Team McLaren-Honda MP4-31 Honda RA616H[8] P 14 Spain Fernando Alonso 1, 3–6 N/A
47 Belgium Stoffel Vandoorne 2
22 United Kingdom Jenson Button 1–6
Germany Mercedes AMG Petronas Formula One Team Mercedes F1 W07 Hybrid Mercedes PU106C Hybrid[7] P 6 Germany Nico Rosberg 1–6 N/A
44 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton 1–6
United Kingdom Manor Racing MRT MRT-Mercedes MRT05 Mercedes PU106C Hybrid[7] P 88 Indonesia Rio Haryanto 1–6 N/A
94 Germany Pascal Wehrlein 1–6
Austria Red Bull Racing Red Bull Racing-TAG Heuer RB12 TAG Heuer P 3 Australia Daniel Ricciardo 1–6 N/A
26 Russia Daniil Kvyat 1–4
33 Netherlands Max Verstappen 5–6
France Renault Sport Formula One Team[3] Renault RS16 Renault RE16[9] P 20 Denmark  Kevin Magnussen 1–6 45
46
France Esteban Ocon
Russia Sergey Sirotkin
30 United Kingdom Jolyon Palmer 1–6
Switzerland  Sauber F1 Team Sauber-Ferrari C35 Ferrari 059/5[6] P 9 Sweden Marcus Ericsson 1–6 N/A
12 Brazil Felipe Nasr 1–6
Italy Scuderia Toro Rosso Toro Rosso-Ferrari STR11 Ferrari 059/4[10] P 33 Netherlands Max Verstappen 1–4 N/A
26 Russia Daniil Kvyat 5–6
55 Spain Carlos Sainz, Jr. 1–6
United Kingdom Williams Martini Racing Williams-Mercedes FW38 Mercedes PU106C Hybrid[7] P 19 Brazil Felipe Massa 1–6 N/A
77 Finland Valtteri Bottas 1–6
Sources:[11][12][13][14][15][16][17]

Team changes

Gene Haas, founder of NASCAR team Haas CNC Racing (top), entered a new team in 2016 (VF-16 pictured bottom).
Lotus (E23 Hybrid pictured top) were purchased by Renault (RS16 pictured bottom).
  • Haas F1 Team, a team formed by NASCAR Sprint Cup Series team owner Gene Haas, joined the Formula One grid, becoming the first American team to compete since the unrelated Haas Lola team competed in 1986.[18][N 1] The team uses power units supplied by Ferrari and a chassis developed by Dallara.[20][21] Dallara last participated in Formula One as the chassis manufacturer for HRT in 2010.[22]
  • Marussia applied for their team name to be changed to Manor Racing, a request granted on 19 January 2016.[23] The team switched from Ferrari to Mercedes power,[24] with the team upgrading to a 2016-specification engine after having used a year-old Ferrari engine in 2015.[25] The team underwent a management reshuffle following the resignation of team principal John Booth and sporting director Graeme Lowdon.[26]
  • Red Bull Racing formally ended their nine-year partnership with engine supplier Renault at the end of the 2015 season,[27] with the team citing the lack of performance from the Renault Energy-F1 2015 engine as a leading factor in the change.[28] The team continued using Renault engines, however they were rebadged as TAG Heuer. Team principal Christian Horner named Renault's partnership with Mario Illien and his company Ilmor as a reason for staying with the manufacturer.[29]
    • Horner said that the team had held exploratory talks with the Volkswagen Group about entering the sport as an engine supplier, but that negotiations came to a halt following the emissions scandal that broke in September 2015.[30] Plans to obtain power units from Mercedes,[31] Honda,[32] and Ferrari fell through as well.[33]
  • Renault returned to Formula One as a full factory-supported team after they purchased Lotus from Genii Capital,[34] the venture capital firm they had originally sold the same team to in 2010, and supplied engines to up until the end of 2014. Lotus's participation in the 2016 season was in question pending the resolution of a High Court case brought against the team by HM Revenue and Customs over unpaid PAYE tax.[35][36]
  • Scuderia Toro Rosso returned to using Ferrari power units, as they had done prior to the start of 2014, after Renault announced that they would no longer supply customer engines.[10][37] The team uses the 059/4 power unit used by Ferrari teams in 2015[38] after Ferrari received approval from the World Motor Sport Council to supply year-old engines on the grounds that the extensive revisions to the engine design meant that they would not be able to manufacture additional 2016 specification engines in time for the start of the season.[citation needed]

Driver changes

Mid-season changes

Scheduled events

File:Formula 1 all over the world-2016-new.svg
Nations that are scheduled to host a Grand Prix in 2016 are highlighted in green, with circuit locations marked with a black dot. Former host nations are shown in dark grey, and former host circuits are marked with a white dot.

The following twenty-one Grands Prix are scheduled to take place in 2016.[1]

Round Grand Prix Circuit Date
1 Australian Grand Prix Australia Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit, Melbourne 20 March
2 Bahrain Grand Prix Bahrain Bahrain International Circuit, Sakhir 3 April
3 Chinese Grand Prix China Shanghai International Circuit, Shanghai 17 April
4 Russian Grand Prix Russia Sochi Autodrom, Sochi 1 May
5 Spanish Grand Prix Spain Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona 15 May
6 Monaco Grand Prix Monaco  Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo 29 May
7 Canadian Grand Prix Canada Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montreal 12 June
8 European Grand Prix[59][60] Azerbaijan Baku City Circuit, Baku[61] 19 June
9 Austrian Grand Prix Austria Red Bull Ring, Spielberg 3 July
10 British Grand Prix United Kingdom Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone 10 July
11 Hungarian Grand Prix Hungary Hungaroring, Budapest 24 July
12 German Grand Prix Germany Hockenheimring, Hockenheim[62] 31 July
13 Belgian Grand Prix Belgium Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot 28 August
14 Italian Grand Prix Italy Autodromo Nazionale Monza, Monza 4 September
15 Singapore Grand Prix Singapore Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore 18 September
16 Malaysian Grand Prix Malaysia Sepang International Circuit, Kuala Lumpur 2 October
17 Japanese Grand Prix Japan Suzuka International Racing Course, Suzuka[63] 9 October
18 United States Grand Prix United States Circuit of the Americas, Austin, Texas 23 October
19 Mexican Grand Prix Mexico Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez, Mexico City 30 October
20 Brazilian Grand Prix Brazil Autódromo José Carlos Pace, São Paulo 13 November
21 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix United Arab Emirates Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi 27 November
Source:[1]

Calendar changes

Formula One will visit Azerbaijan for the first time in 2016 for the revival of the European Grand Prix, with the race to be run on a street circuit in the capital, Baku.

New and returning races

  • The European Grand Prix will return to the calendar after a four-year absence. The race will move from its previous home in Valencia to a brand-new street circuit in Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan. It will be the first Grand Prix to be held in Azerbaijan.[59][60][64][65]
  • The German Grand Prix will return to the Hockenheimring after the event was cancelled in 2015 when a venue could not be secured.[62] The circuit had previously hosted the race in 2014 as part of their agreement with the Nürburgring to alternate between venues, with the Hockenheimring hosting the race every even-numbered year.

Date changes

Failed race bids

  • Following a dispute over taxation, the Indian Grand Prix was removed from the calendar after the 2013 race. After several failed attempts at reviving the race in 2014 and 2015, the event's return was deferred until the 2016 season;[66] however, it was once again left off the final calendar for the season.[1]
  • In 2006, Formula One Management signed a seven-year contract to run the Korean Grand Prix at the Korea International Circuit beginning in 2010. However, the event was discontinued in 2014, and was omitted from the calendar for the third consecutive season in 2016.[67]

Rule changes

General changes

  • The FIA and Formula One Management will be granted greater power to change the Sporting and Technical regulations and to make decisions affecting the governance of the sport.[68]
  • From the Monaco race weekend onwards, the FIA allowed drivers to choose alternative helmet designs for one race weekend per season,[69] a practice previously prohibited as drivers were required to wear the same design to make them more recognisable to spectators and television audiences.[70]

Technical regulations

  • Cars were required to be designed with a separate wastegate for exhaust gases to pass through in a bid to increase the noise of the cars following criticism since the introduction of the 2014 generation of engines.[71]
  • The FIA has opted to increase the number of tokens available for power unit development starting in 2016. While the initial plans would have given manufacturers fifteen tokens for the season, the number was raised to thirty-two, the same number as 2014, in order to allow struggling manufacturers such as Renault and Honda to improve their development. This decision also allows further development on parts that were initially planned to be closed off, including the upper and lower crankcase, valve drive, crankshaft, air-valve system and ancillaries drive.[72]

Sporting regulations

  • Starting in 2016, the number of pre-season tests were reduced from three to two.[73]
  • The FIA formally increased the maximum events allowed in a season from 20 to 21 to accommodate the calendar's approval.[74]
  • Tyre supplier Pirelli introduced a fifth tyre compound known as "ultrasoft",[75] with the manufacturer stating that they would only be available on street circuits.[76]
  • Pirelli changed their approach to tyre supply in 2016, bringing three dry compounds to races instead of two. The compounds are made public two weeks before each event.[77][78][79] Pirelli assigns two "choice" compounds, and a third set (the softest available regardless of Pirelli's selection) are given to teams reaching Q3. Drivers select their remaining ten tyre sets for the event between the three compounds and must use two dry compounds during the race.[74]
  • The stewards were given greater powers in enforcing track limits, with drivers required to stay between the white lines marking the edges of the circuit, except in cases of driver error.[71] The change was introduced after an investigation by Pirelli into Sebastian Vettel's high-speed blow-out at the 2015 Belgian Grand Prix that concluded that Vettel's off-track excursions had been a significant factor in the incident.
  • Any driver who causes the start of the race to be aborted will be required to start the race from pit lane at the restart.[71]
  • The procedure for issuing gearbox penalties was amended so that penalties are applied in the order that they are awarded, bringing the system in line with the wider grid penalty system.[71]
  • The Virtual Safety Car system is to be used in practice sessions as well to avoid the unnecessary use of red flags and session stoppages.[78]
    • The rules governing the used of the drag reduction system, which is deactivated when under Virtual Safety Car periods and full-course yellow flags, were amended to make use of the device available as soon as a Virtual Safety Car period has ended;[78] drivers previously had to wait two laps before the system was reactivated.[80]
  • The qualifying process was heavily revised two weeks before the season began. The three-period format first introduced in 2006 was retained, but with a progressive "knock-out" style of elimination.[81]
    • Following widespread criticism of the format at the opening rounds,[82][83][84] the format was abandoned after two races, and the system used between 2006 and 2015 re-introduced at the Chinese Grand Prix.[85]
  • The stewards' powers to monitor pit-to-car communications were broadened for the 2016 season, with race control able to monitor the radio feeds for each driver in real time and consult with engineering advisors to further monitor the content in a bid to crack down on driver coaching and the use of coded messages.[86]
  • The process new drivers go through in order to qualify for a superlicence will be changed,[87] with additional restrictions put in place as part of the wider FIA Global Pathway.[88][89] The changes were introduced following controversy surrounding Max Verstappen qualifying for a superlicence at the age of sixteen after a single season competing in European Formula 3.[88]

Season report

Pre-season

Jolyon Palmer performing a practice pit stop in his Renault RS16. The black testing livery was later replaced.

For the second year in a row, Hamilton decided not to exercise his option of switching his car number to 1, as was his prerogative as reigning World Champion, and would instead race with his career number 44.[11]

A pre-season tyre test was held at Circuit Paul Ricard in France on 25–26 January 2016, conducted by Pirelli to evaluate their wet weather tyres. Taking part were Red Bull Racing, Ferrari, and McLaren. On the first day, Daniel Ricciardo, Kimi Räikkönen, and Stoffel Vandoorne took the wheels for their respective teams, with Räikkönen and Ricciardo being replaced by Sebastian Vettel and Daniil Kvyat on the second test day.[90] Due to the specific nature of the test, it did not count towards the official pre-season testing allowances.

The first pre-season team test began on 22 February and concluded on 25 February at the Circuit de Catalunya.[91] Ferrari were fastest on three of the four testing days,[92][93][94] with Nico Hülkenberg topping the time sheets for Force India on the third day.[95] However, Mercedes covered the longest testing distance with 3,137.47 km (1,949.53 mi), more than 1,000 km (620 mi) further than the next closest team, Toro Rosso. Sauber, who tested a modified version of their 2015 model, the C34, were close behind with 2,010.96 km (1,249.55 mi).[96]

A second test, also in Barcelona, was conducted on 1–4 March.[91] Ferrari ended the two tests with the best time set overall, 1'22.765m on the newly introduced ultra-soft tyres, while Mercedes were two-and-a-half tenths of a second slower, albeit on the soft tyre compound. Mercedes covered the most distance in testing, almost 5,000 km (3,100 mi).[97][98] The second four days of testing also saw the teams examine a proposed feature for driver head protection, dubbed the "halo".[99]

Opening rounds

The season started with the Australian GP, and featured the newly introduced elimination-style qualifying format. This format was heavily criticized by teams, drivers, fans and the press, to which the decision was taken to review the format before the next race. The Australian GP ended with a 1-2 finish for Mercedes with Nico Rosberg taking victory from Lewis Hamilton in second. Sebastian Vettel and Ferrari finished on the last remaining step of the podium, but team-mate Kimi Raikkonen retiring with a turbo failure on lap 21. On lap 16, whilst attempting to overtake Esteban Gutierrez in the new Haas F1 car at turn three, Fernando Alonso crashed at high speed into the outside barrier before barrel-rolling and land upside-down against the barrier. Gutierrez ended up in the gravel trap with terminal read damage, and quickly went over to Alonso who managed to exit his cockpit unaided. Due to the huge amount of debris caused by the accident the race was red flagged, with the cars subsequently lining up in the pitlane. Romain Grosjean finished an impressive sixth in the other Haas and they became the first new (and "from scratch") team to score points in their inaugural race since Toyota did so in 2002. At the next race in Bahrain, Alonso was ruled out of taking part on medical grounds and was later revealed to have suffered broken ribs and a pneumothorax as a result of the previous race's collision, and was replaced by rookie Stoffel Vandoorne. Following the widespread criticism of the new qualifying format, the teams voted to abandon it and revert to the system used in 2015. However in the week before the race weekend, the sport's Strategy Working Group and over-ruled the teams in order to keep the elimination style for 2016. After qualifying, the system once again came under heavy fire with Hamilton pole position followed by Rosberg and then Vettel. The race saw Rosberg take his second consecutive victory of 2016 followed by Raikkonen and Hamilton, respectively. The Ferrari of Sebastian Vettel and the Renault of Jolyon Palmer retired before the race started with Engine and Hydraulics failures, respectively. Following a first-lap collision with Hamilton, Valtteri Bottas was penalised and given two points on his licence, a subsequent third would result in a ten-place grid penalty. At the next Grand Prix in China, the elimination style qualifying format was permanently dropped in favour of the previous format used between 2006 and 2015, this yielded Nico Rosberg's first pole position of the year after Hamilton suffered a number of setbacks both in qualifying and during the race itself, eventually finishing in seventh place, with his team-mate taking his sixth consecutive victory and third of the 2016 season. The race finished with no retirements, a feat that has only been achieved six times.[100]

In-season testing

The first in-season team test began on 17 May and concluded on 18 May at the Circuit de Catalunya, immediately after the Spanish Grand Prix. Mercedes were originally going to have Nico Rosberg and Esteban Ocon during the test on each day respectively, but at the last minute decided to use their official test driver, Pascal Wehrlein, instead of the latter. The reason for this was that the team wanted "a race-experienced driver to conduct valuable testing".[101] The Sauber team did not take part in the test, citing that they did not have "a young/test driver available that fulfills the requirements",[102] as the regulations state that each team must allocate at least two of the four in-season test days for young driver training tests. Sauber's financial troubles have been well-documented and as a result, the team has been unable to bring developments to the track. Sebastian Vettel driving his Ferrari was fastest on the first day of testing, ahead of Nico Rosberg of Mercedes and Jenson Button in the McLaren.[103] Williams chose to use to experimental aerodynamic rear and front wings during the test, which although outside the legal specifications for the current season, provided increased downforce which they can use in the development of their 2017 car once new regulations have been brought in.[104]

Results and standings

Grands Prix

Round Grand Prix Pole position Fastest lap Winning driver Winning constructor Report
1 Australia Australian Grand Prix United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Australia Daniel Ricciardo Germany Nico Rosberg Germany Mercedes Report
2 Bahrain Bahrain Grand Prix United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Germany Nico Rosberg Germany Nico Rosberg Germany Mercedes Report
3 China Chinese Grand Prix Germany Nico Rosberg Germany Nico Hülkenberg Germany Nico Rosberg Germany Mercedes Report
4 Russia Russian Grand Prix Germany Nico Rosberg Germany Nico Rosberg Germany Nico Rosberg Germany Mercedes Report
5 Spain Spanish Grand Prix United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Russia Daniil Kvyat Netherlands Max Verstappen Austria Red Bull Racing-TAG Heuer Report
6 Monaco  Monaco Grand Prix Australia Daniel Ricciardo United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Germany Mercedes Report
7 Canada Canadian Grand Prix Report
8 Azerbaijan European Grand Prix Report
9 Austria Austrian Grand Prix Report
10 United Kingdom British Grand Prix Report
11 Hungary Hungarian Grand Prix Report
12 Germany German Grand Prix Report
13 Belgium Belgian Grand Prix Report
14 Italy Italian Grand Prix Report
15 Singapore Singapore Grand Prix Report
16 Malaysia Malaysian Grand Prix Report
17 Japan Japanese Grand Prix Report
18 United States United States Grand Prix Report
19 Mexico Mexican Grand Prix Report
20 Brazil Brazilian Grand Prix Report
21 United Arab Emirates Abu Dhabi Grand Prix Report

World Drivers' Championship standings

Points were awarded to the top ten classified finishers in every race, using the following structure:

Position 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
Points 25 18 15 12 10 8 6 4 2 1

In the event of a tie, a count-back system was used as a tie-breaker, with a driver's best result used to decide the standings.[N 3]

Pos. Driver AUS
Australia
BHR
Bahrain
CHN
China
RUS
Russia
ESP
Spain
MON
Monaco
CAN
Canada
EUR
Azerbaijan
AUT
Austria
GBR
United Kingdom
HUN
Hungary
GER
Germany
BEL
Belgium
ITA
Italy
SIN
Singapore
MAL
Malaysia
JPN
Japan
USA
United States
MEX
Mexico
BRA
Brazil
ABU
United Arab Emirates
Points
1 Germany Nico Rosberg 1 1 1 1 Ret 7 106
2 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton 2 3 7 2 Ret 1 82
3 Australia Daniel Ricciardo 4 4 4 11 4 2 66
4 Finland Kimi Räikkönen Ret 2 5 3 2 Ret 61
5 Germany Sebastian Vettel 3 DNS 2 Ret 3 4 60
6 Netherlands Max Verstappen 10 6 8 Ret 1 Ret 38
7 Brazil Felipe Massa 5 8 6 5 8 10 37
8 Finland Valtteri Bottas 8 9 10 4 5 12 29
9 Mexico Sergio Pérez 13 16 11 9 7 3 23
10 Russia Daniil Kvyat DNS 7 3 15 10 Ret 22
11 France Romain Grosjean 6 5 19 8 Ret 13 22
12 Spain Fernando Alonso Ret 12 6 Ret 5 18
13 Spain Carlos Sainz, Jr. 9 Ret 9 12 6 8 16
14 Germany Nico Hülkenberg 7 15 15 Ret Ret 6 14
15 Denmark  Kevin Magnussen 12 11 17 7 15 Ret 6
16 United Kingdom Jenson Button 14 Ret 13 10 9 9 5
17 Belgium Stoffel Vandoorne 10 1
18 United Kingdom Jolyon Palmer 11 DNS 22 13 13 Ret 0
19 Mexico Esteban Gutiérrez Ret Ret 14 17 11 11 0
20 Sweden Marcus Ericsson Ret 12 16 14 12 Ret 0
21 Germany Pascal Wehrlein 16 13 18 18 16 14 0
22 Brazil Felipe Nasr 15 14 20 16 14 Ret 0
23 Indonesia Rio Haryanto Ret 17 21 Ret 17 15 0
Pos. Driver AUS
Australia
BHR
Bahrain
CHN
China
RUS
Russia
ESP
Spain
MON
Monaco
CAN
Canada
EUR
Azerbaijan
AUT
Austria
GBR
United Kingdom
HUN
Hungary
GER
Germany
BEL
Belgium
ITA
Italy
SIN
Singapore
MAL
Malaysia
JPN
Japan
USA
United States
MEX
Mexico
BRA
Brazil
ABU
United Arab Emirates
Points
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Red Did not qualify (DNQ)
Did not pre-qualify (DNPQ)
Black Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Race cancelled (C)
Blank Did not practice (DNP)
Excluded (EX)
Did not arrive (DNA)
Withdrawn (WD)

Bold – Pole position
Italics – Fastest lap

Notes:

  • † – Drivers did not finish the Grand Prix, but were classified as they completed more than 90% of the race distance.


World Constructors' Championship standings

Pos. Constructor No. AUS
Australia
BHR
Bahrain
CHN
China
RUS
Russia
ESP
Spain
MON
Monaco
CAN
Canada
EUR
Azerbaijan
AUT
Austria
GBR
United Kingdom
HUN
Hungary
GER
Germany
BEL
Belgium
ITA
Italy
SIN
Singapore
MAL
Malaysia
JPN
Japan
USA
United States
MEX
Mexico
BRA
Brazil
ABU
United Arab Emirates
Points
1 Germany Mercedes 6 1 1 1 1 Ret 7 188
44 2 3 7 2 Ret 1
2 Italy Ferrari 5 3 DNS 2 Ret 3 4 121
7 Ret 2 5 3 2 Ret
3 Austria Red Bull-TAG Heuer 3 4 4 4 11 4 2 112
26 DNS 7 3 15
33 1 Ret
4 United Kingdom Williams-Mercedes 19 5 8 6 5 8 10 66
77 8 9 10 4 5 12
5 India Force India-Mercedes 11 13 16 11 9 7 3 37
27 7 15 15 Ret Ret 6
6 Italy Toro Rosso-Ferrari 26 10 Ret 30
33 10 6 8 Ret
55 9 Ret 9 12 6 8
7 United Kingdom McLaren-Honda 14 Ret 12 6 Ret 5 24
22 14 Ret 13 10 9 9
47 10
8 United States Haas-Ferrari 8 6 5 19 8 Ret 13 22
21 Ret Ret 14 17 11 11
9 France Renault 20 12 11 17 7 15 Ret 6
30 11 DNS 22 13 13 Ret
10 Switzerland   Sauber-Ferrari 9 Ret 12 16 14 12 Ret 0
12 15 14 20 16 14 Ret
11 United Kingdom MRT-Mercedes 88 Ret 17 21 Ret 17 15 0
94 16 13 18 18 16 14
Pos. Constructor No. AUS
Australia
BHR
Bahrain
CHN
China
RUS
Russia
ESP
Spain
MON
Monaco
CAN
Canada
EUR
Azerbaijan
AUT
Austria
GBR
United Kingdom
HUN
Hungary
GER
Germany
BEL
Belgium
ITA
Italy
SIN
Singapore
MAL
Malaysia
JPN
Japan
USA
United States
MEX
Mexico
BRA
Brazil
ABU
United Arab Emirates
Points
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Red Did not qualify (DNQ)
Did not pre-qualify (DNPQ)
Black Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Race cancelled (C)
Blank Did not practice (DNP)
Excluded (EX)
Did not arrive (DNA)
Withdrawn (WD)

Bold – Pole position
Italics – Fastest lap

Notes:

  • † – Drivers did not finish the Grand Prix, but were classified as they completed more than 90% of the race distance.


Footnotes

  1. An American-registered constructor known as US F1 was accepted to the grid in 2010, but the team collapsed before the start of that season.[19]
  2. Although the Manor Motorsport team shares a name with Manor Racing and was established by former Manor Racing personnel, the two teams are separate entities.
  3. In the event that two or more drivers achieved the same best result an equal number of times, their next-best result was used, and so on. If two or more drivers achieved equal results an equal number of times, the FIA would have nominated the winner according to such criteria as it thought fit.[105]

References

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