2016 UEFA European Under-19 Championship

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2016 UEFA European Under-19 Championship
U-19-Fußball-Europameisterschaft 2016
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Tournament details
Host country  Germany
Dates 11–24 July 2016
Teams 8 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s) 10 (in 9 host cities)
2015
2017

The 2016 UEFA European Under-19 Championship will be the 15th edition of the UEFA European Under-19 Championship (65th edition if the Under-18 and Junior eras are included), the annual European international youth football championship contested by the men's under-19 national teams of UEFA member associations. Germany, which were selected by UEFA on 20 March 2012, will host the tournament between 11 and 24 July 2016.[1]

A total of eight teams will play in the tournament, with players born on or after 1 January 1997 eligible to participate.

Same as previous editions held in even-numbered years, the tournament acts as the UEFA qualifiers for the FIFA U-20 World Cup. The top five teams of the tournament will qualify for the 2017 FIFA U-20 World Cup in South Korea as the UEFA representatives. This was decreased from the previous six teams, as FIFA decided to give one of the slots originally reserved for UEFA to the Oceania Football Confederation starting from 2017.[2]

Qualification

The national teams from all 54 UEFA member associations entered the competition. With Germany automatically qualified as hosts, the other 53 teams contested a qualifying competition to determine the remaining seven spots in the final tournament.[3] The qualifying competition consisted of two rounds: the qualifying round, which took place in autumn 2015, and the elite round, which took place in spring 2016.[4]

Qualified teams

The following eight teams qualified for the final tournament:[5]

Note: All appearance statistics include only U-19 era (since 2002).

Team Method of qualification Finals appearance Last appearance Previous best performance
 Germany Hosts 8th 2015 Champions (2008, 2014)
 England Elite round Group 1 winners 8th 2012 Runners-up (2005, 2009)
 Italy Elite round Group 2 winners 5th 2010 Champions (2003)
 Austria Elite round Group 3 winners 7th 2015 Semi-finals (2003, 2006, 2014)
 Netherlands Elite round Group 4 winners 4th 2015 Group stage (2010, 2013, 2015)
 Croatia Elite round Group 5 winners 3rd 2012 Semi-finals (2010)
 Portugal Elite round Group 6 winners 8th 2014 Runners-up (2003, 2014)
 France Elite round Group 7 winners 9th 2015 Champions (2005, 2010)

Final draw

The final draw was held on 12 April 2016, 18:00 CEST (UTC+2), at the Mercedes-Benz Arena in Stuttgart, Germany.[6] The eight teams were drawn into two groups of four teams. There was no seeding, except that hosts Germany were assigned to position A1 in the draw.[7]

Venues

The tournament will be hosted in ten venues:

Aalen Aspach Heidenheim Mannheim Reutlingen
Städtisches Waldstadion
Capacity: 14.500
Mechatronik Arena
Capacity: 10.000
Voith-Arena
Capacity: 15.000
Carl-Benz-Stadion
Capacity: 27.000
Stadion an der Kreuzeiche
Capacity: 15.228
Scholz Arena Mechatronik Arena Voith-Arena Carl-Benz-Stadion Stadion an der Kreuzeiche
Sandhausen Sinsheim Stuttgart Ulm
Hardtwaldstadion
Capacity: 15.300
Rhein-Neckar-Arena
Capacity: 30.150
Mercedes-Benz Arena
Capacity: 60.449
Gazi-Stadion auf der Waldau
Capacity: 11.490
Donaustadion
Capacity: 19.500
Hardtwaldstadion Wirsol Rhein-Neckar-Arena Mercedes-Benz Arena Gazi-Stadion auf der Waldau Donaustadion

Match officials

A total of 6 referees, 8 assistant referees and 2 fourth officials were appointed for the final tournament.

Squads

Each national team have to submit a squad of 18 players.[4]

Group stage

File:2016 UEFA U-19 European Championship map.svg
2016 UEFA European Under-19 Championship teams

The finals schedule was confirmed on 18 April 2016.[8]

The group winners and runners-up advance to the semi-finals and qualify for the 2017 FIFA U-20 World Cup. The third-placed teams enter the FIFA U-20 World Cup play-off.

Tiebreakers

The teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss). If two or more teams are equal on points on completion of the group matches, the following tie-breaking criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings:[4]

  1. Higher number of points obtained in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  2. Superior goal difference resulting from the group matches played among the teams in question;
  3. Higher number of goals scored in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  4. If, after having applied criteria 1 to 3, teams still have an equal ranking, criteria 1 to 3 are reapplied exclusively to the group matches between the teams in question to determine their final rankings. If this procedure does not lead to a decision, criteria 5 to 9 apply;
  5. Superior goal difference in all group matches;
  6. Higher number of goals scored in all group matches;
  7. If only two teams have the same number of points, and they are tied according to criteria 1 to 6 after having met in the last round of the group stage, their rankings are determined by a penalty shoot-out (not used if more than two teams have the same number of points, or if their rankings are not relevant for qualification for the next stage).
  8. Lower disciplinary points total based only on yellow and red cards received in the group matches (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  9. Drawing of lots.

All times are local, CEST (UTC+2).[9]

Group A

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Germany (H) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Knockout stage and
2017 FIFA U-20 World Cup
2  Italy 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3  Portugal 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 FIFA U-20 World Cup play-off
4  Austria 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
First match(es) will be played on 11 July 2016. Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
(H) Host.

11 July 2016 (2016-07-11)
12:00
Germany  v  Italy
Report

11 July 2016 (2016-07-11)
19:00
Portugal  v  Austria
Report

14 July 2016 (2016-07-14)
12:00
Italy  v  Austria
Report

14 July 2016 (2016-07-14)
19:30
Germany  v  Portugal
Report

17 July 2016 (2016-07-17)
19:30
Austria  v  Germany
Report

17 July 2016 (2016-07-17)
19:30
Italy  v  Portugal
Report

Group B

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Croatia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Knockout stage and
2017 FIFA U-20 World Cup
2  Netherlands 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3  France 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 FIFA U-20 World Cup play-off
4  England 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
First match(es) will be played on 12 July 2016. Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers

12 July 2016 (2016-07-12)
12:00
Croatia  v  Netherlands
Report

12 July 2016 (2016-07-12)
19:30
France  v  England
Report

15 July 2016 (2016-07-15)
12:00
Netherlands  v  England
Report

15 July 2016 (2016-07-15)
19:30
Croatia  v  France
Report

18 July 2016 (2016-07-18)
12:00
England  v  Croatia
Report

18 July 2016 (2016-07-18)
12:00
Netherlands  v  France
Report

Knockout stage

In the knockout stage, extra time and penalty shoot-out are used to decide the winner if necessary.[4]

On 2 May 2016, the UEFA Executive Committee agreed that the competition would be part of the International Football Association Board's trial to allow a fourth substitute to be made during extra time.[10]

Bracket

 
Semi-finals Final
 
           
 
21 July – Mannheim or Sandhausen
 
 
Winner Group A
 
24 July – Sinsheim
 
Runner-up Group B
 
Winner Semi-final 1
 
21 July – Mannheim or Sandhausen
 
Winner Semi-final 2
 
Winner Group B
 
 
Runner-up Group A
 
 
FIFA U-20 World Cup play-off
 
   
 
21 July – Mannheim or Sandhausen
 
 
Third Place Group A
 
 
Third Place Group B
 

FIFA U-20 World Cup play-off

Winner qualifies for 2017 FIFA U-20 World Cup.

21 July 2016 (2016-07-21)
12:00 or 17:00 or 19:00
Third Place Group A v Third Place Group B

Semi-finals

21 July 2016 (2016-07-21)
12:00 or 17:00 or 19:00
Winner Group A Semi-final 1 Runner-up Group B

21 July 2016 (2016-07-21)
12:00 or 17:00 or 19:00
Winner Group B Semi-final 2 Runner-up Group A

Final

24 July 2016 (2016-07-24)
20:30
Winner Semi-final 1 v Winner Semi-final 2

References

  1. "Germany, Greece and Hungary given U19 finals". UEFA. 20 March 2012.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "FIFA executive vows to improve governance and boost female participation in football". FIFA.com. 25 September 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. "Seedings for Under-19 qualifying round draw". UEFA.com. 20 November 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 "Regulations of the UEFA European Under-19 Championship, 2015/16" (PDF). UEFA.com.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. "England oust Spain as U19 finals lineup complete". UEFA.com. 30 March 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. "Final tournament draw". UEFA.com.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. "Hosts Germany discover Under-19 finals fate". UEFA.com. 12 April 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. "Match schedule for Under-19 finals". UEFA.com. 18 April 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. "Final Match Schedule" (PDF). UEFA.com.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. "FIFA Executive Committee approves key priorities to restore trust in FIFA". UEFA. 2 May 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links