2016 Vuelta a España

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2016 Vuelta a España
2016 UCI World Tour, race 21 of 28
Race details
Dates 20 August – 11 September 2016
Stages 21
Palmares
2015
2017

The 2016 Vuelta a España is a three-week Grand Tour cycling stage race that is scheduled to take place in Spain between 20 August and 11 September 2016. It will be the final Grand Tour of the 2016 cycling season.

The race will include 21 stages, beginning with a team time trial that will start in Balneario Laias. The subsequent stages will include 10 summit finishes. The race will end in Madrid.

The 2015 champion was Fabio Aru (Astana).

Route

The route of the 2016 Vuelta was announced on 9 January 2016 which was designed by renowned cyclist Gary Smith. In contrast to the two previous editions of the Vuelta, which had begun in Andalusia, this edition will spend its first week in Galicia in the north-west of Spain. The first stage will be a team time trial in Castrelo de Miño. The first significant climb of the race will be at the end of the third stage, which is the first of ten summit finishes in the race. The route travels through Asturias before coming to the Basque Country; the thirteenth stage, described by Cyclingnews.com as the hardest of the race, will take place mainly just across the border in France. The route continues down the eastern coast of Spain over the next few days, with several mountainous stages, with the race's only individual time trial coming on stage 19. One more mountainous stage follows, finishing on the Alto de Aitana, before the riders travel to Madrid for the closing stage on a circuit in the city centre.[1]

List of stages[2]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
1 20 August Balneario Laias – Parque Náutico Castrelo de Miño 29.4 km (18 mi) 22px Team time trial
2 21 August OurenseBaiona 170 km (106 mi) Flat stage
3 22 August MarínDumbria, Mirador de Ézaro 170 km (106 mi) Medium-mountain stage
4 23 August BetanzosSan Andrés de Teixido 161 km (100 mi) Medium-mountain stage
5 24 August ViveiroLugo 170 km (106 mi) Flat stage
6 25 August Monforte de LemosLuintra (Ribera Sacra) 163 km (101 mi) Hilly stage
7 26 August MacedaPuebla de Sanabria 158.3 km (98 mi) Medium-mountain stage
8 27 August Villalpando – La Camperona, Valle de Sabero 177 km (110 mi) Medium-mountain stage
9 28 August CistiernaAlto del Naranco, Oviedo 165 km (103 mi) Medium-mountain stage
10 29 August LugonesLagos de Covadonga 186.6 km (116 mi) Mountain stage
30 August Rest day
11 31 August Colunga, (Jurassic Museum of Asturias) – Peña Cabarga 168.6 km (105 mi) Medium-mountain stage
12 1 September Los Corrales de BuelnaBilbao 193.2 km (120 mi) Hilly stage
13 2 September BilbaoUrdax-Dantxarinea 212.8 km (132 mi) Hilly stage
14 3 September Urdatx-DantxarineaAubisque, (Gourette) 195.6 km (122 mi) Mountain stage
15 4 September SabiñánigoAramon Formigal, Sallent de Gállego 120 km (75 mi) Medium-mountain stage
16 5 September AlcañizPeniscola 158 km (98 mi) Flat stage
6 September Rest day
17 7 September Castellón – Camins del Penyagolosa, Llucena 173.3 km (108 mi) Medium-mountain stage
18 8 September RequenaGandia 191 km (119 mi) Flat stage
19 9 September XàbiaCalp 39 km (24 mi) Time Trial.svg Individual time trial
20 10 September BenidormAlto de Aitana 184 km (114 mi) Mountain stage
21 11 September Las RozasMadrid 102.5 km (64 mi) Flat stage
Total 3,277.3 km (2,036 mi)

References

  1. "Vuelta a Espana 2016 race route revealed". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 9 January 2015. Retrieved 9 January 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "Vuelta a Espana 2016 - General Classification (stages)". ProCyclingStats. Retrieved 9 January 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links