Andy Biggs

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Andy Biggs
Andy Biggs, official portrait, 115th Congress.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arizona's 5th district
Assumed office
January 3, 2017
Preceded by Matt Salmon
President of the Arizona Senate
In office
January 14, 2013 – January 3, 2017
Preceded by Steve Pierce
Succeeded by Steve Yarbrough
Member of the Arizona Senate
from the 12th district
In office
January 14, 2013 – January 3, 2017
Preceded by John Nelson
Succeeded by Warren Petersen
Member of the Arizona Senate
from the 22nd district
In office
January 10, 2011 – January 14, 2013
Preceded by Thayer Verschoor
Succeeded by Judy Burges
Personal details
Born Andrew Steven Biggs
(1958-11-07) November 7, 1958 (age 60)
Tucson, Arizona, U.S.
Political party Republican
Education Brigham Young University, Utah (BA)
University of Arizona (JD)
Arizona State University, Tempe (MA)
Website House website

Andrew Steven Biggs[1] (born November 7, 1958) is an American politician and a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Arizona's 5th congressional district. The district includes most of the East Valley, covering most of Mesa and Chandler and all of Queen Creek and his hometown of Gilbert.

Previously, he was a member of the Arizona Senate representing District 12 from 2011 to 2017 (numbered as District 22 from 2011 to 2013) and a member of the Arizona House of Representatives representing District 22 from 2003 to 2011. He was President of the Arizona Senate from 2013 to 2017.

Biggs ran in the Republican primary for the 5th District in 2016 after incumbent Republican Matt Salmon announced his retirement. He was not required to give up his state senate seat under Arizona's resign-to-run laws, since he was in the last year of what would have been his final term in the chamber. He won in come-from-behind fashion, narrowly defeating Christine Jones by 27 votes. The margin of victory was confirmed in an automatic recount. This virtually assured him of being the next congressman from this heavily Republican district.

Education

Biggs earned his B.A. in Asian studies from Brigham Young University, his M.A. in political science from Arizona State University, and his J.D. from the University of Arizona.

U.S. House of Representatives

Tenure

Biggs joined the conservative Republican Study Committee.[2] Biggs voted in support of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[3] After the vote, Biggs said that the bill would "provide much-needed economic relief" to Americans and businesses, claiming “families will be able to save more money to send their children to college. We are already seeing the positive economic impact based on the promise of tax reform. When this bill is signed into law, we will see an even more robust economy.”[4]

Committee assignments

Elections

In 2016 Biggs ran for the United States Congress in Congressional District 5 to replace retiring Rep. Matt Salmon (R). Biggs defeated Christine Jones by 27 votes, triggering an automatic recount, to become the Republican candidate.[5] He defeated Democrat Talia Fuentes in November, 64.1% to 35.9%.[6]

State Senate

  • 2010 When Republican Senator Thayer Verschoor ran for State Treasurer of Arizona and left the Senate District 22 seat open, Biggs was unopposed for both the August 24, 2010 Republican Primary, winning with 25,792 votes,[7] and the November 2, 2010 General election, winning with 59,933 votes.[8]
  • 2012 Redistricted to District 12, and with incumbent Republican Senator John B. Nelson redistricted to District 13, Biggs was unopposed for both the August 28, 2012 Republican Primary, winning with 19,844 votes,[9] and the November 6, 2012 General election, winning with 63,812 votes.[10]

State House of Representatives

  • 2002 With incumbent Democratic Representatives Richard Miranda running for Arizona Senate and John Loredo redistricted to District 13, and with Republican Representative Eddie Farnsworth redistricted from District 30, Biggs ran in the five-way September 10, 2002 Republican Primary, placing second with 5,778 votes;[11] Biggs and Representative Farnsworth were unopposed for the November 5, 2002 General election, where Biggs took the first seat with 31,812 votes and Representative Farnsworth took the second seat.[12]
  • 2004 Biggs and Representative Farnsworth were unopposed for the September 7, 2004 Republican Primary; Representative Farnsworth placed first and Biggs placed second with 11,202 votes;[13] for the three-way November 2, 2004 General election, Representative Farnsworth took the first seat and Biggs took the second seat with 51,932 votes ahead of Libertarian candidate Wade Reynolds.[14]
  • 2006 Biggs and Representative Farnsworth were challenged in the four-way September 12, 2006 Republican Primary; Representative Farnsworth placed first and Biggs placed second with 7,793 votes;[15] in the three-way November 7, 2006 General election, Representative Farnsworth took the first seat and Biggs took the second seat with 38,085 votes ahead of Libertarian candidate Edward Schwebel.[16]
  • 2008 With Representative Farnsworth running for Arizona Senate and leaving a House District 22 seat open, Biggs ran in the four-way September 2, 2008 Republican Primary, placing first with 9,800 votes;[17] Biggs and fellow Republican nominee Laurin Hendrix won the November 2, 2010 General election, where Biggs took the first seat with 59,615 votes and Hendrix took the second seat ahead of Democratic nominee Glenn Ray,[18] who had run for the district's senate seat in 2006.

Political positions

Abortion

Biggs opposes abortion of any kind. He wants to overturn Roe vs. Wade.[19]

LGBT rights

Biggs is a former policy advisor to United Families International, a nonprofit that opposes same-sex marriage.[20]

Net neutrality

Biggs has gone on record as opposing government-mandated net neutrality, and favors FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's plan to deregulate the internet. In a letter sent to his constituents in reply to those favoring the continuation of Net Neutrality guidelines, Biggs has said that "the repeal of net neutrality also maintains consumer and anti-competitiveness protections enforced by the FCC and the Federal Trade Commission," and that he "(does) not believe that adding an extra layer of regulations will help to protect consumers. Instead, we should allow the free market to expand the internet and its services."

Robert Mueller

Representative Biggs was one of three Republicans who called for the resignation of Robert Mueller, the prosecutor investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, on the grounds that Mueller can not conduct his investigation fairly because of events that happened when he had been the acting director of the FBI.[21]

Personal life

Biggs is married to Cindy Biggs.[20]

American Family Sweepstakes

Biggs won $10 million in the American Family Sweepstakes and subsequently appeared in a TV ad with Dick Clark and Ed McMahon promoting the sweepstakes.[22][23]

References

  1. "Andy Biggs' Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved January 6, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "Member List". Retrieved 6 November 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. Almukhtar, Sarah (19 December 2017). "How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 December 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. Sunnucks, Mike. "House passes Trump tax cuts; Arizona delegation splits on party lines". Phoenix Business Journal. Retrieved 21 December 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. "Christine Jones concedes after losing by 27 votes to Biggs in GOP Congress primary". Phoenix Business Journal. 16 September 2016. Retrieved 5 May 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. "Arizona's 5th Congressional District election, 2016". BallotPedia. Retrieved 5 May 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2010 Primary Election - August 24, 2010" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 7. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2010 General Election - November 2, 2010" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 5. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2012 Primary Election August 28, 2012" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 5. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 12, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2012 General Election November 6, 2012" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 7. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 24, 2012. Retrieved January 6, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  11. "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2002 Primary Election - September 10, 2002" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 12. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 26, 2004. Retrieved January 6, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  12. "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2002 General Election - November 5, 2002" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 26, 2004. Retrieved January 6, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  13. "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2004 Primary Election - September 7, 2004" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 22, 2004. Retrieved January 6, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  14. "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2004 General Election - November 2, 2004" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 26, 2004. Retrieved January 6, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  15. "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2006 Primary Election - September 12, 2006" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 11. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 26, 2006. Retrieved January 6, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  16. "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2006 General Election - November 7, 2006" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 6, 2006. Retrieved January 6, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  17. "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2008 Primary Election - September 2, 2008" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 24, 2009. Retrieved January 6, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  18. "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2008 General Election - November 4, 2008" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 11. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 19, 2008. Retrieved January 6, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  19. Fischer, Howard. "Supreme Court ruling could invalidate Arizona abortion rules". Arizona Daily Sun. Retrieved 21 December 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  20. 20.0 20.1 Hendley, Matthew (9 March 2012). "Andy Biggs, Other Politicos Tied to Gilbert Religious Group Labeled as Anti-Gay "Hate Group" by Southern Poverty Law Center". Phoenix New Times. Retrieved 21 December 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  21. Newsy, 3 House Republicans Call Mueller Compromised, Demand Resignation, Retrieved November 4, 2017, "...Reps. Gaetz, Biggs and Gohmert think Mueller can't fairly conduct his Russia investigation because of events that happened while he was FBI director./.."
  22. Barry, Jason. "AZ Senate president is former $10M sweepstakes winner". www.azfamily.com. Retrieved 2016-06-20.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  23. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAw1zrLCGNs%7CAndy Biggs American Family Commercial

External links

Arizona Senate
Preceded by
Thayer Verschoor
Member of the Arizona Senate
from the 22nd district

2011–2013
Succeeded by
Judy Burges
Preceded by
John Nelson
Member of the Arizona Senate
from the 12th district

2013–2017
Succeeded by
Warren Petersen
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Matt Salmon
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arizona's 5th congressional district

2017–present
Incumbent
United States order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Jack Bergman
United States Representatives by seniority
381st
Succeeded by
Lisa Blunt Rochester