Brightwen Binyon

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Brightwen Binyon
Born 30 May 1846
Headley Grange, Victoria Park, Manchester
Died 21 September 1905
Bushey, Herefordshire
Occupation Architect
Buildings Various buildings in Suffolk, the Corn Exchange, Ipswich, Concert Pavilion, Felixstowe

Brightwen Binyon, FRIBA, (30 May 1846 – 21 September 1905) was a Manchester-born English architect.

Life

He was born at Headley Grange, Victoria Park, Manchester, the son of Edward Binyon (1791–1855), a sugar refiner and tea dealer, and his wife Jane née Brightwen (1805–1890).[1]

He was educated at a Friends School (formerly Stramongate School) in Kendal.[1] Before training as an architect under Alfred Waterhouse between 1863 and 1871.[2] Later he gained membership of the RIBA. He then travelled around the continent after which he came to Ipswich. He lived with his mother at 43 Fonnereau Road, Ipswich in 1874.[1][3] On 18 September 1879 in Darlington, he married Rachel Mary Cudworth (1853–1949) of Darlington. She was the daughter of William Cudworth and Mary Thompson.[4] They then lived at 5 Henley Road, Ipswich with Brightwen having an architect’s office at 36 Princes Street, Ipswich.[1][5] Henry Percy Adams was later articled to him.[6] He had many commissions in Suffolk including the Corn Exchange, Ipswich the Board School in Bramford Road, Ipswich and the Concert Pavilion, Felixstowe. In 1882, Ipswich council held a design competition for the Corn Exchange. Out of 15 entries to the council, he won using the nom-de-plume "North Light".[7] In 1890, Sunderland, County Durham held an architectural design competition for a town hall on Fawcett Street. This competition was judged by Alfred Waterhouse and was won by Brightwen Binyon. He beat Frank Caws (another renowned local architect). The competition was dogged by accusations of corruption due to the link between Binyon and Waterhouse.[8] In 1892, he won another design competition, beating 44 other designs for the Barrett Browning Institute in Ledbury, Hertfordshire. The design was based on the timber-framed Market House, which was opposite the site. It was completed in 1896. Nikolaus Pevsner was, however, not impressed by its style.[9] In 1897, he was the winner of design of the Felixstowe Spa and Winter Garden. But the design was not implemented.[10]

He became a member of Ipswich Fine Art Club (during 1875–1903) and an exhibitor during 1881–85. He also exhibited at the Royal Academy between 1887 and 1895. In about 1892, the family moved to 'The Cedars', Anglesea Road, Ipswich and, after being in practice for over 25 years, he retired in 1897. He died in Bushey, Hertfordshire on 21 September 1905.

Brightwen and Rachel had four children including Major Basil Binyon (1885–1947, a well-known electrical engineer (also Director of BBC in 1922)), Mary Sims Binyon (1882–1976, an artist and modeller)[11] Olive Binyon (1888–1971) and Janet Binyon (1880–1963).[12] His grandson was the conservation architect Sir Bernard Feilden(1919–2008).[13]

Brightwen Binyon was the 2nd cousin once removed of poet Robert Lawrence Binyon who wrote the poem 'For the Fallen' .

List of Works

  • 1875 Wallpaper design (now in Victoria and Albert Museum).[14]
  • 1875 – Burlington Road Baptist Church, Ipswich .[15]
  • 1872 – The Grove, Stanmore, re-modelling in half-timber style. The home of Naturlaist Eliza Brightwen.[16]
  • 1879 – Bank Premises, Sudbury, Suffolk [17]
  • 1880 – Thistleton Hall, Suffolk [17]
  • 1881 – Sanford Street Boys’ School, Swindon, Wiltshire[18]
  • 1881 Church Lodge,(No 1 Uxbridge Road), Stanmore [19]
  • 1878 – Municipal Buildings, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk [17]
  • 1879 – Ipswich Post Office, Suffolk [17]
  • 1879 – Ipswich School of Art [17]
  • 1879 – Queenstown school Swindon (closed 1990/demolished in 1993)[20]
  • 1879-1881 – Gilberts Hill, Dixon Street, Swindon [21]
  • 1881 - Yarra Primary School, Richmond, Victoria, Australia[22]
  • 1882 – Ipswich Corn Exchange & Shops, Suffolk [23]
  • 1882-1883 – Hill House, Ipswich[24]
  • 1886 – Public Library & Museum, Folkestone, Kent [17]
  • 1888 – Seaside Villas, Felixstowe, Suffolk [17]
  • 1888-1891 – Enlargement of Stanmore Hall for William Knox D'Arcy.[16][19]
  • 1890 – Sunderland Town Hall (later demolished in 1971)[25]
  • 1890 – Swindon Town Hall (Grade II listed building) Town Hall, Regent Circus[26]
  • 1890 - Nethaniah Almshouse, Over Stoke[27]
  • 1892-1893 The Mechanics Institute, Emlyn Square, Swindon, (Considerably enlarged) [28]
  • 1893 – New Public Library, Colchester[29]
  • 1893 – Warehouse, North Street, Colchester [30]
  • 1895 – Granary, Hythe Quay, Colchester [30]
  • 1896 – The Elizabeth Barrett Browning Institute, Ledbury[31]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 "BINYON, Brightwen". www.suffolkpainters.co.uk. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  2. "Sir Bernard Feilden: Conservation architect who brought his skills to Britain's cathedrals, the Great Wall of China and the Taj Mahal". The Telegraph. 16 November 2008. Retrieved 11 September 2012. 
  3. William White History, Gazetteer and Directory of Suffolk, p. 106, at Google Books
  4. "Brightwen Binyon (b. 30 May 1846, d. 21 Sep 1905)". familytreemaker.genealogy.com. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  5. William White History, Gazetteer and Directory of Suffolk, p. 139, at Google Books
  6. Sam Smiles (Editor)Going Modern and Being British: Art, Architecture and Design in Devon County, p. 147, at Google Books
  7. "Ipswich Corn Exchange, Ipswich". remotegoat.com. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  8. Johnson, Michael. "Architectural Competitions Part 4". Retrieved 15 October 2013. 
  9. "Barrett Browning Institute". www.victoriacountyhistory.ac.uk. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  10. Historic England. "CLIFF GARDENS AND TOWN HALL GARDEN (1001220)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  11. "Art Pottery Figures #3 - M S Binyon". meridiangallery.blogspot.co.uk. 13 December 2010. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  12. "Brightwen Binyon". ancestry.com. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  13. Fidler, John (20 November 2008). "Sir Bernard Feilden: Distinguished and prolific conservation architect whose work had global significance". The Guardian. Retrieved 11 September 2012. 
  14. "Wallpaper frieze". collections.vam.ac.uk. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  15. "Ipswich: New bid to recognise properties identified as being of architectural and historical significance – is your home on the list?". ipswichstar.co.uk. 11 September 2013. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  16. 16.0 16.1 "GREAT STANMORE". british-history.ac.uk. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 17.5 17.6 "Brightwen Binyon". archiseek.com. 2012. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  18. Wiles, David (6 January 2013). "Former Sanford Street School is lying enpty [sic]". swindonadvertiser.co.uk. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  19. 19.0 19.1 Bridget Cherry, Nikolaus Pevsner London 3: North West , p. 294, at Google Books
  20. Leakey, Kevin (3 August 2011). "A SHORT HISTORY OF QUEENSTOWN SCHOOL". broadgreenhistory.btck.co.uk. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  21. "Buildings of Significant Local Interest" (pdf). swindon.gov.uk. December 2004. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  22. "History of Yarra Primary". yarraps.vic.edu.au. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  23. "Corn Exchange, Ipswich". www.ippo.co.uk. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  24. "ARCHITECTURAL DRAWINGS OF COLONEL HAROLD RIDLEY HOOPER, A.R.I.B.A. (1886-1953) AND OTHERS, 1882-1939". nationalarchives.gov.uk. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  25. "Sunderland Town Hall". skyscrapernews.com. 8 December 2009. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  26. "Town Hall, Regent Circus". swindonhistory.blogspot.co.uk. 4 September 2011. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  27. "More Almshouses". ipswich-lettering.org. 2004. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  28. "IoE Number: 318752". imagesofengland.org.uk. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  29. "I/Mp 90/1/1/16". seax.essexcc.gov.uk. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  30. 30.0 30.1 "brightwen binyon". colchesterhistoricbuildingsforum.org.uk. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 
  31. "Barrett Browning Institute, Ledbury". britishlistedbuildings.co.uk. Retrieved 22 September 2014. 

External links