César-François Cassini de Thury

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César-François Cassini de Thury
César-François Cassini - Jean-Marc Nattier.jpg
César-François Cassini de Thury,
miniature watercolor on ivory by Jean-Marc Nattier
Born (1714-06-17)17 June 1714
Thury-sous-Clermont, France
Died 4 September 1784(1784-09-04) (aged 70)
Paris, France
Nationality French
Fields Cartography
Astronomy
Institutions Paris Observatory
Known for Topographical map of France

César-François Cassini de Thury (17 June 1714 – 4 September 1784), also called Cassini III or Cassini de Thury, was a French astronomer and cartographer.

Biography

Cassini de Thury was born in Thury-sous-Clermont, in the Oise department, the second son of Jacques Cassini and Suzanne Françoise Charpentier de Charmois.[1] He was a grandson of Giovanni Domenico Cassini, and would become the father of Jean-Dominique Cassini, Comte de Cassini.[2]

In 1739, he became a member of the French Academy of Sciences as a supernumerary adjunct astronomer, in 1741 as an adjunct astronomer, and in 1745 as a full member astronomer.

In January, 1751 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.[3]

He succeeded to his father's official position in 1756 and continued the hereditary surveying operations.[4] In 1744, he began the construction of a great topographical map of France,[5] one of the landmarks in the history of cartography. Completed by his son Jean-Dominique, Cassini IV and published by the Académie des Sciences from 1744 to 1793, its 180 plates are known as the Cassini map (fr).

The post of director of the Paris observatory was created for his benefit in 1771 when the establishment ceased to be a dependency of the French Academy of Sciences.[5]

His chief works are: La méridienne de l’Observatoire Royal de Paris (1744), an arc measurement correction of the Paris meridian (Dunkirk-Collioure arc measurement (Cassini de Thury and de Lacaille)); Description géométrique de la terre (1775); and Description géométrique de la France (1784), which was completed by his son ("Cassini IV").[5]

César-François Cassini de Thury died of smallpox in Paris on 4 September 1784.

Works

  • La méridienne de l’Observatoire Royal de Paris (1744)
  • Description géométrique de la terre (1775)
  • Description géométrique de la France (1784)
  • César-François Cassini de Thury (1775). Relation d'un voyage en Allemagne. Paris: Imprimerie Royale.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

Bibliography

D. Aubin, Femmes, vulgarisation et pratique des sciences au siècle des Lumières : Les Dialogues sur l’astronomie et la Lettre sur la figure de la Terre de César-François Cassini de Thury, Brepols (2020)

See also

References

  1. Jonathan Powell, From Cave Art to Hubble: A History of Astronomical Record Keeping, (Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019), 114
  2. Jonathan Powell, From Cave Art to Hubble: A History of Astronomical Record Keeping, (Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019), 115
  3. "Library and Archive Catalogue". Royal Society. Retrieved 21 December 2010.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>[permanent dead link]
  4. Jonathan Powell, From Cave Art to Hubble: A History of Astronomical Record Keeping, (Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019), 115
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainClerke, Agnes Mary (1911). [https%3A%2F%2Fen.wikisource.org%2Fwiki%2F1911_Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica%2FCassini "Cassini s.v. César François Cassini, or Cassini de Thury" ] Check |ws link in chapter= value (help). In Chisholm, Hugh (ed.). Encyclopædia Britannica. 5 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 459.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links