Chicomecoatl

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Chicomecōātl in an illustration from Rig Veda Americanus

In Aztec mythology, Chicomecōātl [t͡ʃikomeˈkoːaːt͡ɬ] "seven snakes", was the Aztec goddess of agriculture during the Middle Culture period.[1] She is sometimes called "goddess of nourishment", a goddess of plenty and the female aspect of corn.[2]

She is regarded as the female counterpart of the maize god Centeōtl, their symbol being an ear of corn. She is occasionally called Xilonen,[3] (meaning doll made of corn), who was married also to Tezcatlipoca.[4]

She often appeared with attributes of Chalchiuhtlicue, such as her headdress and the short lines rubbing down her cheeks. She is usually distinguished by being shown carrying ears of maize.[2] She is shown in three different forms:

  • As a young girl carrying flowers
  • As a woman who brings death with her embraces
  • As a mother who uses the sun as a shield[2]

See also

References

  1. Aguilar-Moreno, Manuel (2006). Handbook to life in the Aztec world. New York, NY: Facts on File. pp. 197–8. ISBN 0816056730.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Gregg, Susan. The encyclopedia of angels : spirit guides & ascended masters : a guide to 200 celestial beings to help, heal, and assist you in everyday life. Beverly, Mass.: Fair Winds Press. p. 239. ISBN 9781592334667.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. Coulter, Charles Russell; Turner, Patricia (2000). Encyclopedia of ancient deities. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland. ISBN 0786403179.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. Coulter, Charles Russell; Turner, Patricia (2000). Encyclopedia of ancient deities. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland. p. 508. ISBN 0786403179.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>