Congressional Caucus for Women's Issues

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The Congressional Caucus for Women's Issues is a bipartisan caucus of the United States House of Representatives.[1][2] It was founded by fifteen Congresswomen on April 19, 1977, and was originally known as the Congresswomen’s Caucus.[3] Its founding co-chairs were Reps. Elizabeth Holtzman, a New York Democrat, and Margaret Heckler, a Massachusetts Republican.[4] In 1981 men were invited to join and the name of the organization was therefore changed to the Congressional Caucus for Women’s Issues.[5] However, in January 1995, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to eliminate funding for offices and staff of caucus organizations on Capitol Hill; therefore, the Congresswomen reorganized themselves into a Members’ organization.[6] It is still called the Congressional Caucus for Women’s Issues, but men no longer belong to it.[7] Today its membership consists of all women in the U.S. House of Representatives.[8]

In 1990, the Congressional Caucus for Women's Issues inspired a House resolution to honor long-time Caucus Secretary Lindy Boggs by naming the room the caucus met in the Corrine “Lindy” Boggs Congressional Women’s Reading Room, which it is known as today.[9][10] It had previously been known as the Congresswomen’s Reading Room.[11]

The list of legislative accomplishments of the Congressional Caucus for Women's Issues includes:[12]

List of Chairs and Ranking Members

References

  1. "The Women's Caucus - Women's Policy, Inc". Women's Policy, Inc. Retrieved 6 October 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "Congresswoman Marcia Fudge : Congressional Caucuses". Retrieved 6 October 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. "Caucus History - Women's Policy, Inc". Women's Policy, Inc. Retrieved 6 October 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. "Women's Caucus Puts Health at Top of Its '09 List - Womens eNews". Retrieved 6 October 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. "Caucus History - Women's Policy, Inc". Women's Policy, Inc. Retrieved 6 October 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. "Caucus History - Women's Policy, Inc". Women's Policy, Inc. Retrieved 6 October 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. "Caucus History - Women's Policy, Inc". Women's Policy, Inc. Retrieved 6 October 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. "Women's Caucus Puts Health at Top of Its '09 List - Womens eNews". Retrieved 6 October 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. "Caucus History - Women's Policy, Inc". Women's Policy, Inc. Retrieved 6 October 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. "Washington Bids Farewell to Lindy Boggs". Roll Call. Retrieved 6 October 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  11. "Caucus History - Women's Policy, Inc". Women's Policy, Inc. Retrieved 6 October 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  12. "Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney (D-NY)". Retrieved 6 October 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>