Danville, Ohio

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Danville, Ohio
Village
St. Luke's Catholic Church
St. Luke's Catholic Church
Motto: "Gateway To Amish Country"
Location of Danville, Ohio
Location of Danville, Ohio
Location of Danville in Knox County
Location of Danville in Knox County
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Country United States
State Ohio
County Knox
Area[1]
 • Total 0.56 sq mi (1.45 km2)
 • Land 0.55 sq mi (1.42 km2)
 • Water 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation[2] 994 ft (303 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 1,044
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 1,027
 • Density 1,898.2/sq mi (732.9/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 43014
Area code(s) 740
FIPS code 39-20114[5]
GNIS feature ID 1039574[2]

Danville is a village in Knox County, Ohio, United States. The population was 1,044 at the 2010 census.

History

Danville was described in 1833 as having one Methodist meeting house, four dry goods stores, two taverns, two physicians, two blacksmiths, two chairmakers, two tanneries, two hatter shops, two tailor shops, one tinner, two shoemakers, one saddler shop and about 250 inhabitants.[6]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.56 square miles (1.45 km2), of which 0.55 square miles (1.42 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[1]

Buckeye City is a neighborhood of Danville. Buckeye City was laid out in 1880,[7] and was annexed by the village of Danville in 1923.[8]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1830 234
1850 160
1870 134
1880 254 89.6%
1890 292 15.0%
1900 298 2.1%
1910 373 25.2%
1920 383 2.7%
1930 764 99.5%
1940 790 3.4%
1950 853 8.0%
1960 926 8.6%
1970 1,025 10.7%
1980 1,127 10.0%
1990 1,001 −11.2%
2000 1,104 10.3%
2010 1,044 −5.4%
Est. 2014 1,024 [9] −1.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]

2010 census

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 1,044 people, 425 households, and 281 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,898.2 inhabitants per square mile (732.9/km2). There were 474 housing units at an average density of 861.8 per square mile (332.7/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 97.9% White, 0.6% African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.2% of the population.

There were 425 households of which 36.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.5% were married couples living together, 16.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.9% were non-families. 28.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.98.

The median age in the village was 33.8 years. 28.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26% were from 25 to 44; 24.4% were from 45 to 64; and 12.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 49.2% male and 50.8% female.

2000 census

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 1,104 people, 442 households, and 292 families residing in the village. The population density was 2,055.1 people per square mile (789.4/km²). There were 479 housing units at an average density of 891.7 per square mile (342.5/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 98.10% White, 0.09% African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.18% Asian, and 1.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.36% of the population.

There were 442 households out of which 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.0% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.9% were non-families. 28.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the village the population was spread out with 28.1% under the age of 18, 10.6% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 19.9% from 45 to 64, and 15.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 101.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.9 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $28,636, and the median income for a family was $31,375. Males had a median income of $30,208 versus $22,500 for females. The per capita income for the village was $14,595. About 15.0% of families and 15.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.1% of those under age 18 and 13.5% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people

Points of interest

  • Ramser Arboretum
  • Darcy Field - Home of the Danville Lady Blue Devils (District Champions 1994, 2002, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, OHSAA Division IV State Champions 2008)
  • Tough St. Stadium - Home of the Danville Blue Devils
  • Gateway to Amish Country Scenic Byway - State Scenic Byway
  • Kokosing Gap Bike Trail
  • Mohican Valley Trail

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. 2.0 2.1 "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. 3.0 3.1 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. 5.0 5.1 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. Kilbourn, John (1833). The Ohio Gazetteer, or, a Topographical Dictionary. Scott and Wright. p. 170. Retrieved 12 December 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. Graham, Albert Adams (1881). History of Knox County, Ohio: Its Past and Present, Containing a Condensed, Comprehensive History of Ohio. A. A. Graham & Company. p. 556.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. Population. U.S. Government Printing Office. 1931. p. 865.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  11. "Kansas Governor William Eugene Stanley". National Governors Association. Retrieved September 29, 2012.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links