Dicarbonate

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File:Dicarbonate-ester-2D.png
The general structure of dicarbonates

In organic chemistry, a dicarbonate, also known as a pyrocarbonate, is a compound containing the divalent [-O-(C=O)-O-(C=O)-O-] or C
2
O
5
2• functional group, which consists of two carbonate groups sharing an oxygen atom. These compounds can be viewed as double esters of a hypothetical dicarbonic acid, H
2
C
2
O
5
or HO-(C=O)-O-(C=O)-OH. Two important examples are dimethyl dicarbonate H3C-C2O5-CH3 and di-tert-butyl dicarbonate (H3C-)3C-C2O5-C(-CH3)3.

It is one of the oxocarbon anions, consisting solely of oxygen and carbon. Dicarbonate salts are apparently unstable but may have a fleeting existence in carbonate solutions.[1]>

The term "dicarbonate" is sometimes used erroneously to refer to bicarbonate, the common name of the hydrogencarbonate anion [HCO3] or organic group [HCO3-].

See also

References

  1. Zeller, Klaus-Peter; Schuler, Paul; Haiss, Peter (2005). "The hidden equilibrium in aqueous sodium carbonate solutions: Evidence for the formation of the dicarbonate anion". Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. 2005 (1): 168–172. doi:10.1002/ejic.200400445.