EasyDNS

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easyDNS Technologies Inc. is a Canadian Internet Service Provider which supplies DNS and web hosting services.

Wikileaks

In 2010, due to confusing with the similarly named EveryDNS, EasyDNS was widely reported to have cut off DNS service to Wikileaks. EasyDNS subsequently was approached by Wikileaks and agreed to host three domain names for Wikileaks.[1]

Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit

In October 2013 a request from the UK Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit requested they redirect torrentpond.com to an IP address controlled by the PIPCU.

This request was refused due to having no legal basis.[2][3] EasyDNS suggested that registrars that complied with the PIPCU's requests may have violated ICANN's transfer policies.[4] and filed a request for enforcement with ICANN.[5] Following this request, three domains suspended by Public Domain Registry were ordered to be transferred to EasyDNS.[6]

Illegal drug sales and fatality

In 2014, EasyDNS was at the centre of controversy due to its policy of refusing to take down web pages for unlicensed online pharmaceutical companies accused of selling controlled substances without a prescription. EasyDNS CEO Mark Jeftovic referred to the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy as a “batch of clowns” after it asked EasyDNS and other registrars to take down the websites unlicensed pharmacies without court orders. EasyDNS only reversed its policy after a man died after taking a "controlled substance" codeine phosphate purchased without a prescription from airmailchemist.com, an online drug seller registered through EasyDNS Technologies Inc. The man's daughter wrote law enforcement saying: “This website killed my dad.”[7] EasyDNS reversed its policy and now requires online pharmacies to provide proof that they are licensed.[8]

References

  1. "Defenders of WikiLeaks Swarmed Wrong Target". New York Times. December 10, 2010. Retrieved August 5, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. Whatever Happened to "Due Process" ?, EasyDNS, 2013-10-08
  3. Orlowski, Andrew (11 October 2013). "Canadian operator EasyDNS stands firm against London cops". The Register. Retrieved 21 April 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. Jeftovic, Mark. "Registrars that complied with "shakedown" requests may now be in violation of ICANN Transfers Policy". EasyDNS. Retrieved 21 April 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. Jeftovic, Mark. "TDRP proceedings initiated in response to UK police shakedown". Retrieved 21 April 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. Andy. "Registrars Can't Hold 'Pirate' Domains Hostage Without Court Order". Retrieved 21 September 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. "Icann, Regulators Clash Over Illegal Online Drug Sales". Wall Street Journal. October 27, 2014. Retrieved August 5, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. "EasyDNS changes take-down policy after man dies". August 15, 2014. Retrieved August 5, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links