Eclectic Paganism

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Eclectic Paganism, also occasionally termed Universalist or Non-denominational Paganism,'"[1][2] is a form of Paganism where practitioners will blend paganism with aspects of other religious paths or philosophies.[3][4] In the book Handbook of New Age, Melissa Harrington states that "Eclectic Pagans do not follow any particular Paganism, but follow a Pagan religious path, that includes the overall Pagan ethos of reverence for the ancient Gods, including the divine Feminine, participation in a magical world view, stewardship and caring for the Earth, and 'nature religion.'"[1] The practice of Eclectic Paganism is particularly popular with Pagans in North America and the British Isles.[5][2]

Eclectic Paganism has been compared to Reconstructionist Paganism, as Reconstructionist Pagans try to reconstruct the religious traditions of specific groups or time periods while Eclectic Pagans will borrow from several different religious paths, philosophies, and time periods.[6][7]

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Kemp, Daren; Lewis, James R. (2007). Handbook of New Age. Brill Publishers. pp. 435–436. ISBN 9004153551. Retrieved 30 September 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. 2.0 2.1 Lesiv, Mariya (2013). The Return of Ancestral Gods. Mcgill-Queens University Press. p. 22. ISBN 0773542620. Retrieved 30 September 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. Davy, Barbara Jane (2006). Introduction to Pagan Studies. Rowman Altamira. pp. 5, 194. ISBN 978-0-7591-0818-9. Retrieved 30 September 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. Jennings, Peter (2002). Pagan Paths. Random House UK. pp. 113–116. ISBN 9780712611060. Retrieved 30 September 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. Kermani, S. Zohreh (2013). Pagan Family Values. NYU Press. p. 46. ISBN 1479894605. Retrieved 30 September 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. Strmiska, Michael; Strmiska, Michael F. (2005). Modern Paganism in World Cultures: Comparative Perspectives. ABC-CLIO. pp. 18–22, 41, 47. ISBN 9781851096084. Retrieved 30 September 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. Rountree, Kathryn (2015). Contemporary Pagan and Native Faith Movements in Europe. Berghahn Books. p. 12. ISBN 9781782386476. Retrieved 30 September 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links