File:Archytas of Tarentum MAN Napoli Inv5607.jpg

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Summary

Bearded man with turban; the draped bust is a modern restoration bearing the red three-flower Bourbon foundry mark. The identification with <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archytas" class="extiw" title="en:Archytas">Archytas</a> was derived from the comparison of this bust with the head on a coin, afterwards discovered to be false. The Naples National Archaeological Museum currently identifies this bust as <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pythagoras" class="extiw" title="en:Pythagoras">Pythagoras</a>, and says <a rel="nofollow" class="external autonumber" href="http://museoarcheologiconazionale.campaniabeniculturali.it/itinerari-tematici/galleria-di-immagini/RA221">[1]</a> : "The bust, interpreted as Pythagoras, by virtue of the testimony of Aelian (Varia Historia, xii, 32), that the philosopher was usually oriental dress and use a taenia wrapped around the head, similar to the typical headgear still worn in the North Africa and the near and Middle East. ... In addition, strong similarities are found with some replicas in marble representing the philosopher, ... The bust, with rounded shapes and contours, can be considered stylistically a Roman copy from the end of the first century BC, of a Greek original, according to some of the early Hellenistic period, according to others the late Hellenistic period."

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Date/TimeThumbnailDimensionsUserComment
current05:14, 4 January 2017Thumbnail for version as of 05:14, 4 January 20172,667 × 4,000 (7.59 MB)127.0.0.1 (talk)Bearded man with turban; the draped bust is a modern restoration bearing the red three-flower Bourbon foundry mark. The identification with <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archytas" class="extiw" title="en:Archytas">Archytas</a> was derived from the comparison of this bust with the head on a coin, afterwards discovered to be false. The <i>Naples National Archaeological Museum</i> currently identifies this bust as <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pythagoras" class="extiw" title="en:Pythagoras">Pythagoras</a>, and says <a rel="nofollow" class="external autonumber" href="http://museoarcheologiconazionale.campaniabeniculturali.it/itinerari-tematici/galleria-di-immagini/RA221">[1]</a> : "The bust, interpreted as Pythagoras, by virtue of the testimony of Aelian (<i>Varia Historia</i>, xii, 32), that the philosopher was usually oriental dress and use a <i>taenia</i> wrapped around the head, similar to the typical headgear still worn in the North Africa and the near and Middle East. ... In addition, strong similarities are found with some replicas in marble representing the philosopher, ... The bust, with rounded shapes and contours, can be considered stylistically a Roman copy from the end of the first century BC, of a Greek original, according to some of the early Hellenistic period, according to others the late Hellenistic period."
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