Frank Corte, Jr.

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Frank Julius Corte, Jr.
Texas State Representative for
District 123 (Bexar County)
In office
1993–2003
Preceded by Jeff Wentworth
Succeeded by Mike Villarreal
Texas State Representative for
District 122 (Bexar County)
In office
2003–2011
Preceded by John H. Shields
Succeeded by Lyle Larson
Personal details
Born (1959-08-10) August 10, 1959 (age 62)
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Valerie Ann Ryder Corte
Children Three children
Residence San Antonio, Bexar County
Texas, USA
Alma mater Texas A&M University
Army War College
Occupation Real estate businessman
Religion Baptist

Frank Julius Corte, Jr. (born August 10, 1959), is a real estate businessman in San Antonio, Texas, who served as a Republican member of the Texas House of Representatives from Bexar County between 1993 and 2011.

Background

Corte is the son of Frank Corte, Sr. (born c. 1930), and the former Rose Dean (born c. 1933) of San Antonio. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in building construction from Texas A&M University in College Station.[1] He has been a cubmaster for the Boy Scouts of America. Corte is a Sunday school teacher and a deacon at the University Baptist Church in San Antonio.[2]

Corte is employed in the property-management and land-development business.[1]

Political life

In 1982, Corte was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps and served three years on active duty. He joined the Marine Corps Reserve and was activated in the Gulf War of 1991. After the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Corte was recalled to duty and sent to Egypt. In 2002, he graduated from the United States Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. A colonel in the United States Marine Corps, Corte served in the Iraq War for more than six months.[3] He was awarded the Bronze Star.[1] While he was away twice on military deployments, Corte designated his wife, the former Valerie Ann Ryder (born 1967), the mother of their three children, as his stand-in for his legislative duties, a procedure allowed in Texas. [4] Valerie is one of four daughters of the former Mary Louise Wilson (born 1940) and Gene Ed Ryder (born 1932), a native of Canyon in Randall County, Texas, who was reared in Seymour in Baylor County,[5] and was a training administrator for the United States Air Force until his retirement in 1995.[6] Corte's father-in-law Gene Ryder was a member of the Texas State Republican Executive Committee from 1994 to 2000 and a George W. Bush delegate to the 2000 and 2004 Republican National Conventions.[7]

Corte's former House colleague, Carl Isett of Lubbock, also designated his wife, Cheri, as his legislative proxy in 2006, while as a commissioned officer in the United States Naval Reserve, Isett was deployed to Kuwait and Iraq.[8]

Corte was elected in House District 123 in 1992, when the incumbent Jeff Wentworth instead ran successfully for the District 25 seat in the Texas State Senate, a position which Wentworth lost in 2012. Corte is remembered for his unwavering attempts to limit abortion, including his update to the Women's Right to Know Act to ensure the requirement of ultrasounds before a woman in Texas can legally proceed with the termination of a pregnancy.[3]

From 1993 to 1996 and again from 1996 to 1998, Corte was the president of the legislative bipartisan Texas Conservative Coalition.[2] He was moved from District 123 to neighboring District 122 in 2003 to succeed John H. Shields, who did not seek reelection to the House that year but instead unsuccessfully challenged Jeff Wentworth within the Republican primary.[4] In the 1996 U.S. presidential election, Corte was a Republican elector for the Dole/Kemp ticket.[9]

Corte did not seek a tenth two-year term in the Texas House in the 2010 Republican primary and was succeeded in the legislature by former Bexar County Commissioner Lyle Larson, another Republican.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 "State Rep. Frank Corte to step down from the State Legislature, December 30, 2009". September 20, 2011.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Biographical Profile for Frank J. Corte, Jr". vote-tx.org. Retrieved September 20, 2011.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Frank Corte, Jr". txcc.org. Retrieved September 20, 2011.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Frank J. Corte, Jr". lrl.state.tx.us. Retrieved September 20, 2011.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. "Mrs. Rilda New Ryder, wife of Johnny Allen Ryder". Seymour, Texas: The Baylor County Banner, Vol. 56, No. 29. March 13, 1952. Retrieved November 26, 2015. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. "Valerie Ann Corte". intelius.com. Retrieved November 26, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. "Gene Ed Ryder". prabook.org. Retrieved February 23, 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. "Carl Isett". lrl.state.tx.us. Retrieved September 20, 2011.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. "Index of Politicians, Corsa to Coste". politicalgraveyard.com. Retrieved September 20, 2011.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
Preceded by
Jeff Wentworth
Texas State Representative for District 123 (Bexar County)

Frank Julius Corte, Jr.
1993–2003

Succeeded by
Mike Villarreal
Preceded by
John Shields
Texas State Representative for District 122 (Bexar County)

Frank Julius Corte, Jr.
2003–2011

Succeeded by
Lyle Larson