Fuchū Prison

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Fuchū Prison
File:Fuchu prison 1989 air.jpg
Aerial photograph of Fuchū Prison
Location Fuchū, Tokyo, Japan
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Security class Operational
Capacity 2842
Population 2086 (as of December 2015)
Opened 1935 (1935)
Managed by Ministry of Justice (Japan)

Fuchū Prison (府中刑務所 Fuchū keimusho?) is prison in Japan.[1] It is located in the city of the Fuchū, Tokyo to the west of the center of Tokyo Metropolis.[2] Before the end of World War II, Fuchū prison held Communist leaders, members of banned religious sects, and leaders of the Korean independence movement.[3]

Fuchū Prison was opened in June 1935 after the need for a new and larger prison was determined by the Home Ministry in a review following the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake, during which Tokyo’s main prison, Sugamo Prison was destroyed. During the pre-war period, the prison also housed many political prisoners as well as common criminals.

After the war, the prison was visited by Harold Isaac of Newsweek, French correspondent Robert Guillain, John K. Emmerson, E. Herbert Norman and[4] [5] Domei reporter Tay Tateishi.[6]

The 1968 “300 million yen robbery” took place outside of the walls of the prison.

The prison facilities were renovated over a ten year period from 1986 to 1995.

As of December 2015, Fuchū Prison was the largest prison in Japan, housing 2086 prisoners. The prison covers an area of 226,239 square meters, and is surrounded by a 1.8 kilometer wall with a height of 5.5 meters, The cells are divided into four blocks (ordinary prisoners, foreign prisoners, mentally ill prisoners, and physically disabled or injured prisoners). Male foreign prisoners in Japan are generally housed at Fuchu Prison.[7] The prison also contains numerous workshops for vocational training.

Notable Inmates

See also

Further Reading

  • Kyuichi Tokuda, Yoshio Shiga (1947). Eighteen Years in Prison. Jiji Press.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External Links

References

  1. Institute of Pacific Relations. Hearings before the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and Other Internal Security Laws of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate Eighty_Second Congress First Session On The Institute Of Pacific Relations Part 3 September 14, 18, 19, 20, 25, 1951. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off. 1951. pp. 747–753.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. Takemae, Eiji (2003). Allied Occupation of Japan. A&C Black.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. "Japanese Policy "Based Upon Righteousness"". The Guardian. 10 October 1945.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. Institute of Pacific Relations. Hearings before the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and Other Internal Security Laws of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate Eighty_Second Congress First Session On The Institute Of Pacific Relations Part 3 September 14, 18, 19, 20, 25, 1951. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off. 1951. pp. 747–753.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. Takemae, Eiji (2003). Allied Occupation of Japan. A&C Black.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. "JAPAN TO URGE TRADE OF SILK FOR VITAL FOOD To Ask Permission for Barter System; Communists Would Get Rid of Mikadoism". The Montreal Gazette. Oct 4, 1945.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. "JPrisons". Tokyo, Japan - Embassy of the United States.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. Takemae, Eiji (2003). Allied Occupation of Japan. A&C Black.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. Takemae, Eiji (2003). Allied Occupation of Japan. A&C Black.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. Takemae, Eiji (2003). Allied Occupation of Japan. A&C Black.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>