Geologic Calendar

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The Geologic Calendar is a scale in which the geological lifetime of the earth is mapped onto a calendrical year; that is to say, the day one of the earth took place on a geologic January 1 at precisely midnight, and today's date and time is December 31 at midnight.[1] On this calendar, the inferred appearance of the first living single-celled organisms, prokaryotes, occurred on a geologic February 25 around 12:30pm to 1:07pm,[2] dinosaurs first appeared on December 13, the first flower plants on December 22 and the first primates on December 28 at about 9:43pm. The first Anatomically modern humans did not arrive until around 11:48 p.m. on New Year's Eve, and all of human history since the end of the last ice-age occurred in the last 82.2 seconds before midnight of the new year.

See also

References

  1. Kentucky Geological Survey (2011). "The Geological Time Scale v.3" (PDF). Kentucky Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-06-03.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "Geologic History Compressed into 1 Calendar Year". time toast.com. 2010. Retrieved 2013-06-03. External link in |publisher= (help)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>