Grade II listed buildings in Liverpool-L4

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Listed Buildings in Liverpool
Anfield Cemetery Feb 11 2010.jpg
The entrance lodge to Anfield Cemetery, noted as the burial location of Jem Mace and Bill Shankly amongst others
Listed buildings in Liverpool
Grade I listed buildings
Grade II* listed buildings
Grade II listed buildings:

Liverpool is a city and port in Merseyside, England, which contains many listed buildings. A listed building is a structure designated by English Heritage of being of architectural and/or of historical importance and, as such, is included in the National Heritage List for England. There are three grades of listing, according to the degree of importance of the structure. Grade I includes those buildings that are of "exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important"; the buildings in Grade II* are "particularly important buildings of more than special interest"; and those in Grade II are "nationally important and of special interest". Very few buildings are included in Grade I — only 2.5% of the total. Grade II* buildings represent 5.5% of the total, while the great majority, 92%, are included in Grade II.[1]

Liverpool contains more than 1,550 listed buildings, of which 28 are in Grade I, 109 in Grade II*, and the rest in Grade II.[lower-alpha 1] This list contains the Grade II listed buildings in the L4 postal district of Liverpool. This area lies to the northeast of the centre of the city, and is mainly residential. It also contains Stanley Park, and Anfield Cemetery, both of which contain listed buildings. Stanley Park and Anfield Cemetery both are registered in the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens at Grade II*.[2][3] The listed buildings in the park include bridges, walls, shelters, and pavilions. Those in the cemetery include the entrances, lodges, the catacombs, the chapel, the crematorium, and a monument. The postal district also contains part of Walton, formerly a separate town, and now a suburb of Liverpool. The listed building here include churches and associated buildings, houses, and public houses.

Grade II listed buildings from other areas in the city can be found through the template on the right, along with the lists of the Grade I and Grade II* buildings in the city.

Buildings

Name Location Built Notes
Cherry Lane Entrance Anfield Cemetery
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1864 The entrance was designed by Lucy and Littler. It enters the cemetery by way of a bridge under a railway. It is in stone, and incorporates castellated portals, each with a small tower. The carriageway, and the flanking pedestrian ways, pass under Gothic arches, and contain iron gates.[4][5]
Crematorium Anfield Cemetery
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1894–96 The crematorium was designed by James Rhind in free Perpendicular style. It was the fourth crematorium to be built in the country, and was re-ordered in 1953. It is constructed in stone with a slate roof, and has a T-shaped plan, with a south porch and a north wing. What appears to be a northwest tower is a disguised chimney; this has an embattled parapet with gargoyles, and louvered bell openings.[6][7][8]
McLennan Monument Anfield Cemetery
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1893 The monument to Alexander McLennan and his wife is in the form of an Egyptian pylon. It is constructed in granite, and has buttresses, a frieze, and Egyptian-style decoration.[6][9]
North Catacomb Anfield Cemetery
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c. 1863 Designed by Lucy and Littler, the part above is built in stone with a slate roof. Its features include buttressed arcades, and a corbelled parapet with gargoyles. When in use, coffins were lowered on stone catafalques by hydraulic lift.[10][7][11]
Priory Road Entrance (north) Anfield Cemetery
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1862 The entrance contains a red sandstone screen designed by Lucy and Littler. In the centre is an octagonal Gothic clock tower, surmounted by a gable with a pinnacle. Flanking the tower are iron gates, outside which are gate piers with truncated spires. Between the piers are pedestrian ways, above which are iron canopies.[10][12]
Priory Road Entrance (south) Anfield Cemetery
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c. 1862 The entrance consists of four gate piers with gates, designed by Lucy and Littler. The gate piers are in stone with moulded bases and pyramidal finials. The gates are in wrought iron and are richly ornamented.[10][13]
South Catacomb Anfield Cemetery
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c. 1863 Designed by Lucy and Littler, the part above is built in stone with a slate roof. Its features include buttressed arcades, and a corbelled parapet with gargoyles. When in use, coffins were lowered on stone catafalques by hydraulic lift.[10][7][14]
South Chapel Anfield Cemetery
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c. 1862 The only surviving chapel of the three designed for the cemetery by Lucy and Littler. It is built in stone with a slate roof, and is in Gothic Revival style. The chapel consists of a nave with an apse, aisles, and porches. Above the north porch is a tower, with buttresses, loured bell openings, gargoyles, and a spire incorporating lucarnes and pinnacles.[10][15]
Walton Lane Entrance Anfield Cemetery
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c. 1862 The entrance gate and gate piers were designed by Lucy and Littler. There are four stone gate piers with pyramidal finials. The wrought iron gates are richly ornamented.[10][16]
Anfield County Girls Secondary School Anfield Road
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Early 19th century Built as a school, later used as a house, it is a stuccoed building with a slate roof. It has two storeys, and is in four bays. The windows are a mix of sashes and casements, with a bay window at the rear. The porch has flat pilasters and an entablature.[17]
Lodge Anfield Road
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1868 This is located at the Anfield Road entrance to Stanley Park. The lodge was designed by E. R. Robson, and is built in sandstone with slate roofs. There are two storeys, with a front of three bays, and sides of two bays. Most of the windows are mullioned. On the left side is a two-storey bay window.[18][19]
Roseneath Cottage 5 Anfield Road
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Early 19th century The cottage is constructed in sandstone with a slate roof. It has two storeys and casement windows. The porch has an architrave and a castellated parapet.[20]
9 and 11 Anfield Road
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c. 1840 A pair of semi-detached houses, with an extension to No. 11. No. 9 is stuccoed, and No. 11 is pebbledashed. The houses are in two storeys with an attic and two steep gables, and stretch for six bays. The windows are casements or 20th-century replacements.[21]
35 and 37 Anfield Road
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Mid 19th century A pair of stuccoed semi-detached houses with a slate roof. The houses are in two storeys with attics. Each house is in two bays and has a gable. They both have canted bay windows with embattled crests. All the windows are 20th-century casements.[22]
39 and 41 Anfield Road
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Mid 19th century A pair of stuccoed semi-detached houses with a slate roof. The houses are in two storeys with attics. Each house is in two bays and has a gable. They both have canted bay windows with embattled crests. All the windows are 20th-century casements.[23]
43 and 45 Anfield Road
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Mid 19th century A pair of stuccoed semi-detached houses with a slate roof. The houses are in two storeys with attics. Each house is in two bays and has a gable. They both have canted bay windows with embattled crests. All the windows are 20th-century casements.[24]
Arkles Public House Arkles Lane
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1880s The public house is constructed in yellow brick with red brick and stone dressings and a slate roof. It has two storeys and an attic, and is in three bays in the front and at the sides. Its features include friezes, mullioned windows, and a clock tower with a pyramidal roof.[25]
59–73 Barlow Lane
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Early to mid 19th century A terrace of eight brick cottages with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have two storeys, and each cottage is in two bays. Some of the cottages have sash windows, others have casement windows, all under wedge lintels.[26]
Glebe Hotel 195 County Road, Walton
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Undated A stone public house with a slate roof. It is in three storeys, and has three bays on each front, with a canted bay on the corner. Above the corner bay is a small tower with windows in two stages, and a short spire.[27]
St John the Evangelist's Church Fountains Road
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1885 A Roman Catholic church designed by J. and B. Sinnot. It is in sandstone with a slate roof. The church consists of a nave and chancel with no internal division, transepts, and chapels. At the southeast corner is a stair turret, and a belfry with a small pyramidal roof. The east window has seven lights, and the west window has five.[28][29]
St Columba's Church Pinehurst Road
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1931–32 The church was designed by Bernard A. Miller, and is constructed in silvery-grey brick with a green pantile roof. It consists of a nave, transepts, and a chancel with a chapel and a vestry. At the northwest is a bellcote with a shaped gable. The windows are lancets.[30][31]
Lansdowne House Priory Road
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c. 1862 Originally the registrar's office for Anfield Cemetery, it was designed by Lucy and Littler. It is built in stone with a slate roof, and has an irregular plan. The building is in two storeys and has a front of five bays. The front contains gables, and there are bay windows on the front and back. Otherwise the windows are placed irregularly, and are mullioned.[10][32]
Lodge (north) 238 Priory Road
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1862 The lodge for Anfield Cemetery was designed by Lucy and Littler. It is constructed in stone, and has a slate roof. The building has an L-shaped plan, with a porch in the angle, and has two storeys. It contains an oriel window in the ground floor. There is also an octagonal staircase turret, with a lancet window, an embattled parapet, and a spire with fleuron.[10][33]
Lodge (south) 242 Priory Road
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1862 The lodge for Anfield Cemetery was designed by Lucy and Littler. It is constructed in stone and has a hipped slate roof. The building is in one storey with an attic. There are two bays on all sides. The bay to left of the entrance projects forward; it has a canted bay window with a gable above.[10][34]
Kirkdale Community Centre Stanley Road, Kirkdale
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1886 This was built as the Gordon Working Lads Institute, and was designed by David Walker in Renaissance Revival style. It is built in common brick with red brick dressings, and has a slate roof. It is in two storeys with an attic, and has a front of nine bays and sides of five bays. Its front is elaborately decorated, including its gables, some of which are shaped, and others are stepped.[35][36]
Bandstand Stanley Park
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1899 The bandstand is in cast iron, and has an octagonal roof with a decorative peak. This is carried on eight thin iron columns.[18][37]
Bridge Stanley Park
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1870 The bridge is located to the northwest of the pavilion to the east of the lake. It was designed by E. R. Robson, and consists of iron girders supporting iron railings between stone piers. The space under the bridge has been filled in.[18][38]
Bridge Stanley Park
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c. 1870 This bridge is to the north of the east end of the lake. It was designed by E. R. Robson, and consists of stone abutments supporting iron girders with iron rails. At the ends of the bridge are stone piers.[18][39]
Bridge Stanley Park
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c. 1870 The bridge is located to the east of the pavilion. It was designed by E. R. Robson, and consists of iron girders supporting iron railings between stone piers. The space under the bridge has been filled in.[18][40]
Bridge Stanley Park
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c. 1870 The bridge is located to the east end of the lake. It was designed by E. R. Robson, and consists of iron girders supporting iron railings between stone abutments. At the ends of the bridge are stone piers.[18][41]
Bridge Stanley Park
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Late 19th century The bridge crosses the lake. It is in stone, and consists of six dentilled arches carried on piers. Alternate piers have projecting refuges supported by corbels. The parapet contains recessed panels.[18][42]
Conservatory Stanley Park
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1899 Designed by Mackenzie and Moncur, the conservatory is a structure in iron and glass on a stone base. It has 15 bays on the front and back, and seven bays on the sides. On top is a clerestory and a hipped roof.[18][43][44]
Pavilion
(east of screen wall)
Stanley Park
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1870 The pavilion is sited at the east end of the main section of the screen wall. It is built in stone with a slate roof and has an octagonal plan. Each side contains a two-bay arcade with a central column. On the top is a lantern with five lights on each side.[18][45]
Pavilion
(east of lake)
Stanley Park
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1870 The pavilion is sited to the east of the lake. It is a square building with a stone base and a wooden superstructure. It has a hipped slate roof with a small gable. There are two flights of steps leading up to the pavilion and one down to the basement.[18][46]
Pavilion
(west of screen wall)
Stanley Park
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1870 The pavilion is sited at the west end of the main section of the screen wall. It is built in stone with a slate roof and has an octagonal plan. Each side contains a two-bay arcade with a central column. On the top is a lantern with five lights on each side.[18][47]
Pavilion (small) Stanley Park
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c. 1870 The pavilion is sited to the north of the bowling greens. It was designed by E. R. Robson, and is in cast iron. The pavilion has a hexagonal core of decorated iron walls, with seats on five sides. Above is a verandah carried on iron columns.[18][48]
Screen wall Stanley Park
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1870 The stone wall has a central section, and two side sections meeting the central section at narrow angles. It was designed by E. R. Robson. Along the wall is blind arcading and buttresses with conical pinnacles. The central section contains a rectangular pavilion.[4][49]
Shelter (east) Stanley Park
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c. 1870 This is located at the east end of the park. It was designed by E. R. Robson, and is in cast iron. The shelter has a front of three bays, with a single bay at the sides, the corner bays being canted. Composite columns support pierced arch braces and a hipped roof.[50]
Shelter (southeast) Stanley Park
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1870 This is located to the southeast of the lake. It was designed by E. R. Robson, and is built in stone. It has a hexagonal plan, with a six-sided base in the centre, but no seats. The timber roof is carried on round columns with pointed arches, and has a lantern with a pyramidal roof.[51]
Terrace Stanley Park
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c. 1870 The terrace runs along the top of the bowling greens, and has a long sandstone wall. This has a rusticated base and small buttresses. At the ends are canted projections, in the centre is a rectangular projection, and between these on each side are bowed projections.[6][52]
St Mary's Church Walton
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1829–32 Although it was the ancient parish church of Liverpool, the oldest existing part is the west tower. Alterations were made to the church in the 1840s and in 1911. In 1940 the body of the church was destroyed by incendiary bombs, and was rebuilt in 1947–53. The exterior appears as it did formerly, but the interior is modern.[53][7][54]
St Mary's Churchyard Wall Walton
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19th century A sandstone wall surrounding the churchyard of St Mary's. It contains three entrances, each with gabled stone piers containing an overthrow with a lantern. Incorporated in the wall facing County Road is a drinking fountain.[55]
Hearse house,
St Mary's Churchyard
Walton
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Early 19th century The hearse house is constructed in stone, but only its façade has survived. It has an entrance under a pointed arch, and at the top is a cornice with crenellations.[56][57]
Mortuary,
St Mary's Churchyard
Walton
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Early 19th century Only the façade of the mortuary remains. It is in rusticated stone, standing on a plinth. At the top is a pediment with a cornice and acroteria. There is a blocked window in the tympanum.[53][58]
Sundial,
St Mary's Churchyard
Walton
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Early 18th century The sundial consists of a baluster on a square base. The gnomon is missing.[59][60]
Old School House Walton
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17th century The house, later used as a scout hut, stands inside the churchyard of St Mary's Church. It is constructed in stone, with a stone slate roof. The building has three storeys, with three bays on the front and two bays on the sides. There is a single-bay extension to the rear. The windows are mullioned, containing casements. The doorway has a Tudor arch.[61]
Milepost Walton Lane
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1865 The cast iron milepost was erected by the Liverpool Health Committee. It records the exact distance from Liverpool Town Hall and the height above Old Dock Sill.[62]
Lodge 302 Walton Lane
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1862 The lodge to the north end of the entrance to Anfield Cemetery was designed by Lucy and Littler. It is constructed in stone, and has a slate roof. The building has an L-shaped plan, with a porch in the angle, and has one storey with an attic. On the front is a canted bay window over which are the arms of Liverpool. Above the entrance to the porch is inscribed the word "SEXTON".[10][63]
Lodge 304 Walton Lane
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1862 The lodge to the south end of the entrance to Anfield Cemetery was designed by Lucy and Littler. It is constructed in stone, and has a slate roof. The building has an L-shaped plan, with a porch in the angle, and has one storey with an attic. It contains an oriel window in the ground floor. Above this is another window, over which are the arms of Liverpool. Above the entrance to the porch is inscribed the word "SEXTON".[10][64]
Post Office 1 Walton Road
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1905 Constructed in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof, the building has a central block of two storeys with an attic in three bays and, on each side, a single-storey wing, one of four bays and one of six. All the windows are sashes. Other features include Diocletian windows, windows with architraves, and coped gables with round windows. In the central block are windows flanked by Ionic columns, above which is an open pediment containing a cartouche and a segmental parapet.[65]
Old Rectory Walton Village
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c. 1800 A porte-cochère was added in about 1830. The house is in stone with a slate roof, and has three storeys. There are seven bays on the front and back, and three on the sides. On the north side is an octagonal stair turret. The gables and parapet are embattled, and the windows are sashes. The porte-cochère has three Tudor arches, buttresses rising to turrets, and finials.[66]
Police and Fire Station Westminster Road
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1885 This was designed by Thomas Shelmerdine, and consisted of a police station, a fire station and a bridewell. It has a complex plan, and is built in brick with sandstone dressings and slate roofs. The windows are mullioned and transomed. Arising from the roof of the former police station is a tiled spire.[28][67]
File:Anfield Cemetery Feb 11 2010 (13).jpg
South Catacomb, Anfield Cemetery
File:35-45 Anfield Road.jpg
35–45 Anfield Road
File:Stanley Park Feb 11 2010 (18).jpg
Bridge over lake, Stanley Park
File:Stanley Park Feb 11 2010 (4).jpg
Conservatory, Stanley Park
File:Lodge, Stanley Park.jpg
Lodge, Stanley Park
File:Stanley Park, Liverpool (7).JPG
Pavilion, Stanley Park
File:Stanley Park, Liverpool (12).JPG
Screen wall, Stanley Park
File:Stanley Park, Liverpool - DSC00707.JPG
Southeast shelter, Stanley Park

See also

Architecture of Liverpool

References

Notes

  1. These figures are taken from a search in the National Heritage List for England in May 2013, and are subject to variation as further buildings are listed, grades are revised, or buildings are delisted.

Citations

  1. Listed Buildings, Historic England, retrieved 25 March 2015<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. Historic England, "Stanley Park, Liverpool (1001000)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. Historic England, "Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool (1000993)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. 4.0 4.1 Pollard & Pevsner (2006), pp. 395–396
  5. Historic England, "Cherry Lane entrance to Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool (1280396)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 395
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Pye (2011), p. 199
  8. Historic England, "Crematorium at Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool (1072972)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. Historic England, "McLennan Monument to north west of crossing of main paths, Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool (1205269)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. 10.00 10.01 10.02 10.03 10.04 10.05 10.06 10.07 10.08 10.09 10.10 Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 394
  11. Historic England, "North Catacomb, Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool (1068390)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  12. Historic England, "Main entrance to Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool (1025284)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  13. Historic England, "Entrance to Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool (1365824)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  14. Historic England, "South Catacomb, Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool (1068391)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  15. Historic England, "South Chapel, Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool (1356295)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  16. Historic England, "Entrance to Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool (1062570)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  17. Historic England, "Anfield County Girls Secondary School (old building only), Liverpool (1280792)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  18. 18.00 18.01 18.02 18.03 18.04 18.05 18.06 18.07 18.08 18.09 18.10 18.11 Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 396
  19. Historic England, "Lodge on Anfield Road, Stanley Park, Liverpool (1063332)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  20. Historic England, "Roseneath Cottage, 5 Anfield Road, Liverpool (1356296)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  21. Historic England, "9 and 11 Anfield Road, Liverpool (1068392)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  22. Historic England, "35 and 37 Anfield Road, Liverpool (1280797)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  23. Historic England, "39 and 41 Anfield Road, Liverpool (1356297)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  24. Historic England, "43 and 45 Anfield Road, Liverpool (1205323)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  25. Historic England, "The Arkles Public House, Liverpool (1356258)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  26. Historic England, "59–73 Barlow Lane, Liverpool (1356260)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  27. Historic England, "195 County Road (Glebe Hotel), Liverpool (1068299)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  28. 28.0 28.1 Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 435
  29. Historic England, "Church of John the Evangelist, Liverpool (1068245)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  30. Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 393
  31. Historic England, "Church of Saint Columba, Liverpool (1208872)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  32. Historic England, "Lansdowne House, Priory Road Liverpool (1072971)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2013<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
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Sources

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  • Pye, Ken (2011), Discover Liverpool, Liverpool: Trinity Mirror Media, ISBN 978-1-906802-90-5<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links