Grade I listed buildings in Greater Manchester

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File:Greater Manchester County (3).png
The metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, divided into ten metropolitan boroughs

There are 48 Grade I listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade I structures are those considered to be "buildings of exceptional interest".[1] In England, the authority for listing under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990[2] rests with Historic England, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

The metropolitan county of Greater Manchester is made up of 10 metropolitan boroughs: Bolton, Bury, Manchester, Oldham, Rochdale, Salford, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford and Wigan. The Grade I buildings in each borough are listed separately. Manchester, the world's first industrialised city,[3] has 15 of Greater Manchester's 45 Grade I listed buildings, the highest number of any borough. Oldham is the only borough to have no listed buildings with a Grade I rating.[4] The River Irwell forms the boundary between Manchester and Salford, so one listed structure, the railway bridge over the Irwell, has been listed under both Manchester and Salford.

Most of Greater Manchester's listed buildings date from the Victorian and Edwardian periods.[1] According to an Association for Industrial Archaeology publication, Greater Manchester is "one of the classic areas of industrial and urban growth in Britain, the result of a combination of forces that came together in the 18th and 19th centuries: a phenomenal rise in population, the appearance of the specialist industrial town, a transport revolution, and weak local lordship".[5] Much of the region, historically a part of Lancashire, was at the forefront of textile manufacturing from the early 19th century until the early 20th century, and the county includes several former mill towns.[6][7] Greater Manchester has a wealth of industrial heritage, represented by industrial architecture found throughout the county,[7] but most of its Grade I listed buildings have a municipal, ecclesiastic or other cultural heritage.

The oldest Grade I listed structure in Greater Manchester is the Parish Church of St Mary the Virgin in Eccles, completed in the 13th century but greatly expanded since then. There are eight listed manor houses, the earliest of which date from the 14th century; Wardley Hall, still in use today as the residence of the Roman Catholic Bishop of Salford, has the preserved skull of St Ambrose Barlow – one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales – on display in a niche at the top of the main staircase.[8] Three buildings are attributed to engineer George Stephenson. One of them, Liverpool Road railway station, is the oldest surviving railway station in the world.[9] The newest Grade I listed building in Greater Manchester is Royd House, built and designed by Edgar Wood in 1916 as his residence.[10] Twenty-two buildings, almost half of the total, were completed in the 19th century.

Bolton

Bury

Manchester

Rochdale

Salford

Stockport

Tameside

Trafford

Wigan

See also

Footnotes

  1. 1.0 1.1 "What is a listed building?". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 8 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (c. 9)". Ministry of Justice. Retrieved 17 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. Kidd, Alan (2006). 'Manchester: A History'. Carnegie Publishing. ISBN 1-85936-128-5. Archived from the original on 27 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. "Statistics by County". Images of England. Retrieved 22 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. McNeil & Nevell (2000), p. 2.
  6. Cowhig, W. T. (1976). It Happened Round Greater Manchester; Textiles. Greater Manchester Council.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. 7.0 7.1 McNeil & Nevell (2000), pp. 2–3.
  8. "Wardley Hall". Images of England. Retrieved 22 January 2008.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. "History of the Museum". Museum of Science and Industry. Retrieved 22 January 2008.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. 10.0 10.1 Historic England. "Royd House (1067922)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 19 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  11. Historic England. "10, Firwood Fold (1388038)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  12. Historic England. "Smithills Hall (1388279)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  13. Historic England. "Hall i th Wood (1388052)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  14. Historic England. "Church of All Saints (1356818)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  15. Barnet, Stewart. "The Parish Church of All Saints' Stand, Whitefield". allsaintsmanchester.org. Retrieved 13 February 2010.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  16. Historic England. "Church of St Mary and St Bartholomew (1163125)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  17. "Church of St Mary". bury.gov.uk. Retrieved 23 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  18. Historic England. "Church of St Mary (1067252)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  19. Historic England. "Radcliffe Tower (1309271)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  20. Historic England. "Albert Memorial (1197820)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 April 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  21. Historic England. "Baguley Hall (1291962)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 April 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  22. Canniffe (1998), p. 77.
  23. "History of Cathedral conservation area". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 14 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
    "Chetham's Hospital School". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 14 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
    "Listed buildings in Manchester by street (L)". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 14 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
    "Chetham's Library, Manchester". Bridgeman Art Library. Retrieved 14 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
    Historic England. "Chetham's Hospital and Attached Wall (1283015)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 23 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  24. Historic England. "Roman Catholic Church of the Holy Name of Jesus (1271296)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 23 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  25. Historic England. "Church of St Ann (1247612)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 April 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  26. Historic England. "The Edgar Wood Centre (1197770)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 April 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  27. Canniffe (1998), pp. 6, 35.
  28. "Listed buildings in Manchester by street (K)". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 14 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  29. Historic England. "Former Bank of England (1282404)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 23 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  30. Historic England. "Heaton Hall (1200809)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 23 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  31. Historic England. "John Rylands Library and Attached Railings, Gate and Lamp Standards (1217800)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 23 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  32. Historic England. "Former Liverpool Road Railway Station Masters House (1291477)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 24 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  33. Historic England. "City Art Gallery (1282980)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 24 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  34. Historic England. "Cathedral Church of St Mary (1218041)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 24 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  35. Historic England. "Town Hall (1207469)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 24 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  36. Historic England. "Old Warehouse to North of Former Liverpool Road Railway Station (1282991)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 24 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  37. 37.0 37.1 The River Irwell is the boundary between Manchester and Salford, so one end of this bridge is in Manchester, the other is in Salford. "Railway bridge over the River Irwell". Images of England. Retrieved 24 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  38. 38.0 38.1 Historic England. "Railway bridge Over River Irwell to Former Liverpool Road Station (1270603)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 24 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  39. "Church of Saint Edmund and Associated Boundary Wall, Railings and Gates". English Heritage. Retrieved 25 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  40. The church has parts dating from 1120 and 1412, but substantially from 1524. The wooden steeple, built in 1667 on top of the stone tower, is believed to be one of three remaining in the country. "Church of St Leonard". vmims.com. Archived from the original on 29 August 2007. Retrieved 24 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  41. "Church of St Leonard". vmims.com. Archived from the original on 29 August 2007. Retrieved 24 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  42. Historic England. "Church of St Leonard (1162332)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 25 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  43. Cunningham, C. (1981). Victorian & Edwardian Town Halls. Routeledge.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  44. Historic England. "Town Hall (1084275)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 25 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  45. "National Collection of Lutyens' War Memorials Listed". Historic England. Retrieved 9 November 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  46. "Rochdale Cenotaph". Historic England. Retrieved 9 November 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  47. 47.0 47.1 47.2 "Index to the List of Buildings, Structures and Features of Architectural, Archaeological or Historic Interest in Salford". Salford City Council. Retrieved 22 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  48. "Ordsall Hall". Images of England. Retrieved 22 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  49. "St Mary's Church". Images of England. Retrieved 22 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  50. "St Mark's Church, Worsley". GENUKI.org.uk. Retrieved 13 January 2008.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  51. Hyde, O'Rourke & Portland (2004), p. 77.
  52. "Wardley Hall". Images of England. Retrieved 22 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  53. Historic England. "Bramall Hall (1260476)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  54. Pevsner, Nikolaus (1969). The Buildings of England: South Lancashire. Penguin Books. pp. 371–72. ISBN 0-14-071036-1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  55. Historic England. "Church of St Elisabeth (1356851)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  56. Historic England. "Church of St George, Stockport (1067194)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 10 October 2011.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  57. Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 609.
  58. Historic England. "Church of St George (1067194)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  59. "Statutory Listing - St Thomas' Church St Thomas' Place". Stockport Historic Environment Database. Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council. Retrieved 5 April 2010.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  60. "Church of St Thomas". Images of England. Retrieved 23 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  61. Arrowsmith, Peter (1997). Stockport: a history. Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council. ISBN 0-905164-99-7.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  62. "Church of St Mary". Images of England. Retrieved 22 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  63. Historic England. "Church of St Mary, Cheadle (1241643)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  64. Pevsner, Nikolaus; Hubbard, Edward (2003) [1971]. The Buildings of England: Cheshire. Yale University Press. p. 127. ISBN 0-300-09588-0.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  65. Historic England. "Church of St Anne (1309251)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 19 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  66. "Church of St Anne". Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council. Retrieved 22 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  67. Historic England. "Church of St Michael and All Angels (1162800)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 19 July 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  68. Historic England. "Church of All Saints (1067879)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 April 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  69. Historic England. "Dunham Hall (1356512)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 April 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  70. Historic England. "Carriage House Immediately to South of Kitchen Courtyard (1067942)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 April 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  71. Historic England. "Stables to South of Hall (1356495)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 April 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  72. Historic England. "Old Church of St Werburg (1067865)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 April 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  73. Historic England. "Church of St Wilfrid (1287160)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 April 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 The date given is the date used by Historic England as significant for the initial building or that of an important part in the structure's description.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 Sometimes known as OSGB36, the grid reference is based on the British national grid reference system used by the Ordnance Survey.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 The "List Entry Number" is a unique number assigned to each listed building and scheduled monument by Historic England.

Bibliography

  • Canniffe, Eamonn (1998). Manchester Architecture Guide. University of Manchester. ISBN 1-900756-06-4.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  • Hartwell, Clare; Hyde, Matthew; Pevsner, Nikolaus (2004). Lancashire: Manchester and the South-East. The Buildings of England. Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-10583-5.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  • Hartwell, Clare; Hyde, Matthew; Hubbard, Edward; Pevsner, Nikolaus (2011) [1971]. Cheshire. The Buildings of England. Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-17043-6.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  • Hyde, M.; O'Rourke, A; Portland, P. (2004). Around the M60: Manchester's Orbital Motorway. AMCD (Publishers). ISBN 1-897762-30-5.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  • Kidd, Alan (2006). Manchester: A History. Carnegie Publishing. ISBN 1-85936-128-5. Archived from the original on 27 December 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  • McNeil, Robina; Nevell, Michael (2000). A Guide to the Industrial Archaeology of Greater Manchester. Association for Industrial Archaeology. ISBN 0-9528930-3-7.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  • Wyke, Terry (2005). Public Sculpture of Greater Manchester. Liverpool University Press. ISBN 0-85323-567-8.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links

Media related to Grade I listed buildings in Greater Manchester at Wikimedia Commons