J. Batty Langley

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J. Batty Langley
File:J.Batty Langley.jpg
Member of Parliament for Sheffield Attercliffe
In office
1894–1909
Preceded by Bernard Coleridge
Succeeded by Joseph Pointer
President of the General Union of Railway Clerks
In office
1897–1898
Preceded by New position
Succeeded by W. D. Leaver
Personal details
Born 20 March 1834
Died February 1914 (aged 79–80)
Political party Liberal Party

J. Batty Langley (20 March 1834 – 19 February 1914) was a British Liberal Party politician.

Born in Uppingham, Langley became a wealthy timber merchant in Sheffield, and one of the city's most prominent non-conformists. He was elected to Sheffield Town Council, serving many years and becoming an alderman.[1]

In 1892, Langley became Mayor of Sheffield, and saw an eventful year in office. Sheffield became a city, while Langley organised a conference in the city, aiming to settle the 1893 UK coal strike.[1] Claiming to represent the interests of the working class, he was elected as the Member of Parliament at the Sheffield Attercliffe by-election, 1894. As an employer, he was a controversial choice, and the Independent Labour Party stood a candidate against him.[2]

Langley became the first President of the General Union of Railway Clerks in 1897, although he resigned due to ill health the following year.[2] He retained his Parliamentary seat until he retired in 1909.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Michael Stenton and Stephen Lees, Who's Who of British MPs: Volume II, 1886-1918
  2. 2.0 2.1 Single or Return - the official history of the Transport Salaried Staffs' Association

External links

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Bernard Coleridge
Member of Parliament for Sheffield Attercliffe
1894–1909
Succeeded by
Joseph Pointer
Political offices
Preceded by
New position
President of the General Union of Railway Clerks
1897–1898
Succeeded by
W. D. Leaver