Jacks Fork

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File:Jacks Fork River bluffs 1 jsigler.jpg
A line of bluffs along the Jacks Fork

Jacks Fork[1] is one of two rivers in Missouri that are part of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways system.

Starting in Texas County, Missouri, this spring-fed river flows 46.4 miles (74.7 km)[2] in a general east to northeasterly direction through the heart of the geological area known as the Lower Ozark Natural Division. It is the major tributary of the Current River, ending at its confluence near Eminence, Missouri.

The first 25 miles (40 km) from the Prongs to Bay Creek is deep valley and in the springtime provides Class II water. Due to lack of access, it is the most primitive of the rivers in the region. From Alley Spring to its confluence with the Current River it is a Class I River and is floatable year round with warm water.

The Jacks Fork provides some of the most natural conditions in the region with many caves and natural springs. It is a popular recreation destination for canoeists and kayakers and is generally considered a Class I-II difficulty river.

The river is mentioned in the lyrics of the Greg Brown song "Walkin' Daddy" on the album Covenant.[3]

Location

Mouth
Confluence with the Current River, Shannon County, Missouri: Lua error in Module:Coordinates at line 668: callParserFunction: function "#coordinates" was not found.[1]
Source
Confluence of the North Prong and South Prong, Texas County, Missouri: Lua error in Module:Coordinates at line 668: callParserFunction: function "#coordinates" was not found.[1][4][5]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "Jacks Fork". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2014-01-21.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. U.S. Geological Survey. National Hydrography Dataset high-resolution flowline data. The National Map, accessed March 9, 2011
  3. Greg Brown - Lyrics for Covenant [1] accessed April 12, 2011
  4. "North Prong Jacks Fork". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2014-01-21.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. "South Prong Jacks Fork". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2014-01-21.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>