June 1937

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1937
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
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The following events occurred in June 1937:

June 1, 1937 (Tuesday)

June 2, 1937 (Wednesday)

June 3, 1937 (Thursday)

June 4, 1937 (Friday)

June 5, 1937 (Saturday)

  • French troops were rushed to the İskenderun region to control the rioting between Arabs and Turks.[3]

June 6, 1937 (Sunday)

June 7, 1937 (Monday)

June 8, 1937 (Tuesday)

June 9, 1937 (Wednesday)

June 10, 1937 (Thursday)

June 11, 1937 (Friday)

June 12, 1937 (Saturday)

June 13, 1937 (Sunday)

  • The Nationalists came within two miles of Bilbao, capturing a range of hills east of the city.[18]

June 14, 1937 (Monday)

June 15, 1937 (Tuesday)

June 16, 1937 (Wednesday)

June 17, 1937 (Thursday)

June 18, 1937 (Friday)

June 19, 1937 (Saturday)

June 20, 1937 (Sunday)

June 21, 1937 (Monday)

June 22, 1937 (Tuesday)

June 23, 1937 (Wednesday)

  • Hitler sent the strongest units of the Kriegsmarine toward Valencia for a "demonstration" after dropping out of the international neutral ship patrol for the second time, since Britain and France refused to allow Germany to secure satisfaction for an alleged Spanish submarine attack on the cruiser Leipzig. Spain warned that it would fight back if any power shelled a Republican city.[37][38]
  • Born: Martti Ahtisaari, 10th President of Finland and Nobel laureate, in Viipuri, Finland

June 24, 1937 (Thursday)

  • Paul Robeson made an important speech on the Spanish Civil War at the Royal Albert Hall in London during a benefit to raise funds for Basque refugee children. "There is no standing above the conflict on Olympian heights. There are no impartial observers", Robeson said. "The liberation of Spain from the oppression of fascist reactionaries is not a private matter of the Spaniards, but the common cause of all advanced and progressive humanity."[23][39]
  • The 8th Imperial Conference ended.
  • Liechtenstein added a crown to its national flag so it would no longer be identical to the flag of Haiti.

June 25, 1937 (Friday)

  • Neville Chamberlain made his first major foreign policy speech in the House of Commons, in which he asked influential members of British society to exercise caution when talking about Germany's policy toward Spain to avoid a larger European war. "I have read that in the high mountains there are sometimes conditions to be found when an incautious move or even a sudden loud exclamation may start an avalanche", Chamberlain said. "That is just the condition in which we are finding ourselves to-day. I believe, although the snow may be perilously poised it has not yet begun to move, and if we can all exercise caution, patience and self-restraint we may yet be able to save the peace of Europe."[40][41]
  • The historical adventure film Wee Willie Winkie starring Shirley Temple and Victor McLaglen premiered in Los Angeles.[42]
  • Born: Keizō Obuchi, Prime Minister of Japan, in Nakanojō, Gunma, Japan (d. 2000)
  • Died: Colin Clive, 37, English actor (tuberculosis)

June 26, 1937 (Saturday)

June 27, 1937 (Sunday)

  • Martin Niemöller gave what would be his last sermon in Nazi Germany, stating, "No more are we ready to keep silent at man's behest when God commands us to speak. For it is, and must remain, the case that we must obey God rather than man."[44]

June 28, 1937 (Monday)

  • The new French Finance Minister Georges Bonnet addressed the country's financial crisis by closing the stock market and suspending all commercial payments in gold and foreign currencies until further notice.[45]
  • The Soviet Union executed 36 more people for spying.[32]
  • Born: Ron Luciano, baseball umpire, in Endicott, New York (d. 1995)
  • Died: George Warren Russell, 83, New Zealand politician

June 29, 1937 (Tuesday)

June 30, 1937 (Wednesday)

References

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  3. 3.0 3.1 "Rush French Troops to Quell Turk-Arab Riots in Syrian City". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 6, 1937. p. 2.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. "Tageseinträge für 2. Juni 1937". chroniknet. Retrieved September 9, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. "Frick Suspends Dizzy Dean for Not Apologizing". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 3, 1937. p. 31.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. "Dean Threatens to Sue Frick for $250,000". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 4, 1937. p. 31.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. "10,000 Workers See Nazi Navy Maneuvers Off Heligoland Isle". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 5, 1937. p. 6.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. "League Lifts Suspension; Dean Pitches Today". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 5, 1937. pp. 17, 19.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. Forrester, Wade (May 19, 2014). "May 19, 1937: The Battle at Sportsman's Park". On This Day in Cardinal Nation. Retrieved September 9, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. Sjoden, Kerstin (June 4, 2009). "June 4, 1937: Humpty Dumpty and the Shopping Cart". Wired. Retrieved September 9, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
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  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 "Tageseinträge für 8. Juni 1937". chroniknet. Retrieved September 9, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  13. "Jean Harlow's Bier a $100,000 Floral Mound". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 10, 1937. p. 1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  14. "'Rebuild Hansa City Hamburg, Show Our Might,' Hitler Says". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 11, 1937. p. 1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  15. "Red Sox Trade Two Ferrells to Washington". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 11, 1937. p. 29.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  16. "Russia Shaken; Call Troops". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 11, 1937. p. 1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  17. "Russia Orders Eight General Shot". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 12, 1937. p. 1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  18. Stephens, Pembroke (June 14, 1937). "Rebels Capture Last Ridge; Fire Down on Bilbao". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 7.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  19. Darrah, David (June 15, 1937). "Rebels Cut Off Bilbao Harbor; Fight for City". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
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  21. "Social Crediters Unite to Pass Alberta Budget As R.C.M.P. Ouster Fails". Winnipeg Tribune. June 15, 1937. p. 3.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
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  23. 23.0 23.1 Simkin, John (2014). "Spanish Civil War: Chronology". Spartacus Educational. Retrieved September 9, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  24. "Germany and Italy Rejoin Neutrals' Ship Patrol Around Spain". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 17, 1937. p. 4.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  25. Schultz, Sigrid (June 17, 1937). "Germany to Vury Warship Victims in State Today". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 10.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
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  27. Díaz Ayala, Cristóbal (Fall 2013). "Arsenio Rodríguez" (PDF). Encyclopedic Discography of Cuban Music 1925–1960. Florida International University Libraries. Retrieved October 7, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  28. Stephens, Pembroke (June 19, 1937). "Basque Verdun Falls; Rebels Close on Bilbao". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  29. "Il Duce Decrees Self a $9,375,000 Income Per Year". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 19, 1937. p. 1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  30. 30.0 30.1 "Spirit of 1937". Life. July 5, 1937. p. 13.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
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  33. "French Cabinet Out; Dictator Plea Rejected". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 21, 1937. p. 1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  34. "Wimbledon's Tennis Games Portrayed in London by Television". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 22, 1937. p. 1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  35. Ward, Arch (June 23, 1937). "Louis Wins Title: Knockout". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  36. 36.0 36.1 Cortada, James W., ed. (1982). Historical Dictionary of the Spanish Civil War, 1936–1939. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. p. 508. ISBN 0-313-22054-9.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  37. Darrah, David (June 24, 1937). "Hitler Orders Fleet to Move Near Valencia". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 4.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
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  43. "Mary Pickford Wed to Rogers in Simple Rites". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 27, 1937. p. 1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
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  45. Small, Alex (June 29, 1937). "Crisis as Paris Stops Gold". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  46. "Rebels Capture Spanish Town on Santander Road". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 30, 1937. p. 6.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
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  49. Schultz, Sigrid (July 1, 1937). "Hitler Takes Over Treasury of Protestants". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
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