Lioré et Olivier LeO 20

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LeO 20
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Lioré et Olivier LeO 20
Role night-bomber
National origin France
Manufacturer Lioré et Olivier
First flight 1927
Introduction 1928
Retired 1939
Status retired
Primary user French Air Force
Number built 320[1]
Developed from Lioré et Olivier LeO 122

The Lioré et Olivier LeO 20 was a French night-bomber aircraft built by Lioré et Olivier.

Development

The LeO 20 was a development of the LeO 122 prototype. It won the 1926 French ministry competition for a new night-bomber, and received an order for 50 aircraft. The first were delivered at the end of 1926 and flight tested at Villacoublay in 1927. A total of 311 aircraft were delivered to the French air arm, ending in December 1932.[2]


Variants

  • LeO 20 - twin-engine night bomber with Gnome-Rhône 9Ady engines (320 built)
  • LeO 201 - re-designation for parachute trainers converted from LeO 20
  • LeO 203 - four-engine version with Gnome-Rhône 7Kb engines
  • LeO H-20/4 - floatplane version of LeO 203
  • LeO 206 - production version of LeO 203 with revised nose, ventral "balcony" and tail gun (37 built)
  • LeO 207 - similar to LeO 206 but with different nose and smaller "balcony" (3 built)
  • LeO 208 - similar to LeO 20 but with enclosed cabin and Gnome-Rhône 14Mrs engines

Operators/Units using this aircraft

 Brazil
 France
 Romania

Specifications (LeO 20)

Data from [1]

General characteristics

  • Capacity: 3
  • Length: 13.81 m (45 ft 4 in)
  • Wingspan: 22.25 m (73 ft in)
  • Height: 4.26 m (13 ft 12 in)
  • Wing area: 105 m2 (1,130 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 2,725 kg (6,008 lb)
  • Gross weight: 5,460 kg (12,037 lb)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Gnome-Rhone 9Ady radial piston, 313 kW (420 hp) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 198 km/h (123 mph)
  • Range: 1,000 km (621 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 5,760 m (18,900 ft)

Armament

  • 2x 7.7mm machine guns on pivot mount in nose
  • 2x 7.7mm machine guns in dorsal position
  • 1x 7.7mm machine gun in ventral bin
  • up to 500kg (1,102lb) of bombs

See also

Related lists

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Sharpe, 2000. pg 243.
  2. Donald, 1997. pg 565.

Bibliography

  • Sharpe, Michael (2000). Biplanes, Triplanes, and Seaplanes. London: Friedman/Fairfax Books. ISBN 1-58663-300-7. 
  • Donald, David, ed. (1997). The Encyclopedia of World Aircraft. Prospero Books. ISBN 1-85605-375-X.