List of Ethiopian dishes and foods

From Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core
Jump to: navigation, search
This meal, consisting of injera bread topped with several kinds of wat (stew), is typical of Ethiopian cuisine.

This is a list of Ethiopian dishes and foods. Ethiopian cuisine characteristically consists of vegetable and often very spicy meat dishes, usually in the form of wat (also w'et or wot), a thick stew, served atop injera, a large sourdough flatbread,[1] which is about 50 centimeters (20 inches) in diameter and made out of fermented teff flour.[1] Ethiopians eat exclusively with their right hands, using pieces of injera to pick up bites of entrées and side dishes.[1] Utensils are rarely used with Ethiopian cuisine.

Ethiopian dishes and foods

Kitfo is a traditional dish in Ethiopian cuisine
Shahan ful (pictured right, garnished with lemon)
  • Ensete – An economically important food crop in Ethiopia.[2][3]
  • Teff – a grain widely cultivated and used in the countries of Eritrea and Ethiopia, where it is used to make injera or tayta. Teff accounts for about a quarter of total cereal production in Ethiopia.[4]
  • Fit-fit – an Ethiopian and Eritrean food typically served for breakfast
  • Ful medames – an Egyptian dish of cooked and mashed fava beans served with vegetable oil, cumin and optionally with chopped parsley, onion, garlic, and lemon juice, it is also a popular meal in Ethiopia and other countries
  • Ga'at – a stiff porridge
  • Gored gored – a raw beef dish
  • Guizotia abyssinica – an erect, stout, branched annual herb, grown for its edible oil and seed
  • Himbasha
  • Injera – a spongy, slightly sour flatbread regularly served with other dishes
  • Kitcha
  • Kitfo
  • Niter kibbeh – a seasoned, clarified butter used in Ethiopian cooking
  • Rhamnus prinoides
  • Samosa (also sambusa)
  • Shahan ful
  • Shiro – a stew with primary ingredients of powdered chickpeas or broad bean meal
  • Wat – stew or curry that may be prepared with chicken, beef, lamb, a variety of vegetables, spice mixtures such as berbere, and niter kibbeh, a seasoned clarified butter. Wat is traditionally eaten with injera.

Spices

Beverages

  • Coffee
  • Tej – a honey wine[10] or mead that is brewed and consumed in Ethiopia and Eritrea
  • Tella – a traditional beer from Ethiopia and Eritrea

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Javins, Marie. "Eating and Drinking in Ethiopia." Gonomad.com. Accessed July 2011.
  2. RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. "Uses of Enset". The 'Tree Against Hunger': Enset-Based Agricultural Systems in Ethiopia. American Association for the Advancement of Science. 1997. Retrieved 13 August 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Zaude. Market Institutions, Transaction Costs, and Social Capital in the Ethiopian Grain Market. Washington, DC: International Food Policy Research Institute, 2001
  5.  Aframomum corrorima was published in Spices, Condiments and Medicinal Plants in Ethiopia, Their Taxonomy and Agricultural Significance. (Agric. Res. Rep. 906 & Belmontia New Series) 12:10. 1981. The specific epithet was taken from its basionym, Amomum corrorima A.Braun GRIN (April 9, 2011). "Aframomum corrorima information from NPGS/GRIN". Taxonomy for Plants. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland: USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Retrieved June 19, 2011. Synonyms: (≡) Amomum corrorima A.Braun (basionym)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. Bernard Roussel and François Verdeaux (April 6–10, 2003). "Natural patrimony and local communities in ethiopia: geographical advantages and limitations of a system of indications" (PDF). 29th Annual Spring Symposium of Centre for African Studies. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2006-11-26. This Zingiberaceae, Aframomum corrorima (Braun) Jansen, is gathered in forests, and also grown in gardens. It is a basic spice in Ethiopia, used to flavor coffee and as an ingredient in various widely used condiments (berbere, mitmita, awaze, among others).<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. Debrawork Abate (1995(EC)) [1993(EC)]. የባህላዌ መግቦች አዘገጃጀት (in Amharic) (2nd ed.). Addis Ababa: Mega Asatame Derjet (Mega Publisher Enterprise). pp. 22–23. Unknown parameter |trans_title= ignored (help); Check date values in: |year= (help) <templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. Gall, Alevtina; Zerihun Shenkute (November 3, 2009). "Ethiopian Traditional and Herbal Medications and their Interactions with Conventional Drugs". EthnoMed. University of Washington. Retrieved January 27, 2011.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. Katzer, Gernot (July 20, 2010). "Ajwain (Trachyspermum copticum [L.] Link)". Retrieved January 28, 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. Bahiru, Bekele; (et al.) (July–September 2001). "Chemical and nutritional properties of 'tej', an indigenous Ethiopian honey wine: variations within and between production units". Vol. 6, No. 3. The Journal of Food Technology in Africa. pp. 104–108. Retrieved 13 November 2014. <templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>