List of things named after Kim Il-sung

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Kim Il-sung was the founder and first leader of North Korea. Jane Portal, the author of Art Under Control in North Korea, assesses that: "[i]t is probably the case that Kim Il-sung [had] more buildings named after him during his lifetime than any other leader in history".[1] North Korea claims that "[m]ore than 480 streets, institutions and organizations in 100 countries were named after Kim Il Sung".[2] Since Kim Il-sung's name Il-sung can mean "the Sun", many things named after him are actually called this way.[3]

List

Schools

Museums

Streets, squares and parks

File:Kim Il-sung Lane street sign.jpg
"Kim Il Sung Lane" in Damascus is one of as many as 450 streets around the world named after the North Korean president.

Awards

Other

Named after the Sun

Proposed namings

  • "Kim Il-sung City" – proposed name for Pyongyang after Kim Il-sung's death. Another proposal was to name Pyongyang "Kim Jong-il City" and name Seoul "Kim Il-sung City" once reunification would be attained.[34]

See also

References

  1. Portal 2005, p. 90.
  2. ""Kim Il Sung's Korea", Special Write-ups to Centenary of His Birth (27)". web.archive.org. KCNA. 13 April 2012. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014. Retrieved 2015-10-08. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 Lim 2015, p. 88.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 Lim 2015, p. 37.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 "The best North Korean schools named after Kim Il Sung" (PDF). 3 February 2014. Retrieved 8 October 2015. 
  6. Andrei Lankov (3 November 2008). "(260) Kim Il-sung University". koreatimes. Retrieved 9 July 2015. 
  7. "13th Supreme People's Assembly election compilation". North Korean Economy Watch. 9 March 2014. Retrieved 25 November 2015. 
  8. "August Name of Kim Il Sung" (PDF). Bulletin. krld.pl. 170: 2. Retrieved 10 December 2015. 
  9. Demick, Barbara (29 December 2009). Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea. Random House Publishing Group. p. 145. ISBN 978-0-385-52961-7. 
  10. "South Hamgyong Museum of the Revolutionary Activities of Comrade Kim Il Sung, Hamhung". Flickr. Retrieved 31 May 2016. 
  11. "Sinuiju". Korea Konsult. Retrieved 18 March 2016. 
  12. "South Pyongan Museum of the Revolutionary Activities of Comrade Kim Il Sung, Pyongsong". Flickr. Retrieved 31 May 2016. 
  13. Melvin, Curtis (15 May 2013). "North Korea's 'do it yourself' Kim Jong Un idolization campaign". NK News. Retrieved 18 March 2016. 
  14. "BBC Monitoring Alert - DPRK". WikiLeaks. BBC. 13 February 2013. Retrieved 18 March 2016. 
  15. "Kim Jong Il Gives Field Guidance to Different Fields in Wonsan City". KCNA. 27 April 2009. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2016. 
  16. "Officials of Trade Unions Start Study Tour of Mt. Paektu Area". KCNA. 10 June 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2016. 
  17. Kwon & Chung 2012, p. 140.
  18. Suki Kim (4 December 2014). Without You, There Is No Us: My secret life teaching the sons of North Korea's elite. Ebury Publishing. p. 116. ISBN 978-1-4735-2765-2. Retrieved 9 July 2015. 
  19. Charles K. Armstrong (25 June 2013). Tyranny of the Weak: North Korea and the World, 1950–1992. Cornell University Press. pp. [1924]. ISBN 978-0-8014-6893-3. 
  20. Paul Moorcraft (31 October 2011). Inside the Danger Zones: Travels to Arresting Places. Biteback Publishing. p. 273. ISBN 978-1-84954-280-7. Retrieved 9 July 2015. 
  21. Kate Mayberry (12 July 2012). "Wrestling with N Korean diplomacy – Al Jazeera Blogs". Al Jazeera Blogs. Retrieved 9 July 2015. Kate Mayberry 
  22. 22.0 22.1 Elizabeth Whitman (31 August 2015). "Syria Pledges Support For North Korea, Kim Jong Un: Baath Party Praises Pyongyang For Strong Relations Amid 'Terrorism' Threats". International Business Times. Retrieved 8 October 2015. 
  23. Andrei Lankov (10 April 2013). The Real North Korea: Life and Politics in the Failed Stalinist Utopia. Oxford University Press, USA. p. 143. ISBN 978-0-19-996430-7. Retrieved 9 July 2015. 
  24. Michael Breen (1 February 2012). Kim Jong-Il, Revised and Updated: Kim Jong-il: North Koreas Dear Leader, Revised and Updated Edition. John Wiley & Sons. p. 43. ISBN 978-1-118-15377-2. Retrieved 4 July 2015. 
  25. James Hoare (13 July 2012). Historical Dictionary of Democratic People's Republic of Korea. Scarecrow Press. p. 181. ISBN 978-0-8108-6151-0. Retrieved 4 July 2015. 
  26. 26.0 26.1 26.2 Kim Da Seul (22 June 2012). "Kim Il Sung's Image on Medals Changed". dailynk.com. Retrieved 8 October 2015. 
  27. 27.0 27.1 Lim 2015, p. 38.
  28. Mark Edward Harris (8 March 2007). Inside North Korea. Chronicle Books. p. 33. ISBN 978-0-8118-5751-2. Retrieved 9 July 2015. 
  29. "Assessing the leadership transition in North Korea: Using network analysis of field inspections, 1997–2012". sciencedirect.com. 47: 145. doi:10.1016/j.postcomstud.2014.04.003. Retrieved 9 July 2015. 
  30. "'Juche(Self-Reliance)' Ideology". KBS. Retrieved 9 July 2015. 
  31. Portal 2005, p. 92.
  32. Portal 2005, p. 93.
  33. Kwon & Chung 2012, p. 72.
  34. Mok Yong Jae (12 February 2012). "Kim Jong Il's Name Set for Widespread Use". dailynk.com. Retrieved 9 July 2015. 

Sources