Listed buildings in Yealand Redmayne

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Yealand Redmayne is a civil parish in Lancaster, Lancashire, England. It contains 15 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings. Of these, one is at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The parish contains the village of Yealand Redmayne, and is otherwise rural. Most of the listed buildings are houses, farmhouses and farm buildings, many of them on the main street of the village. The Lancaster Canal passes through the parish, and two bridges crossing it are listed, together with a milestone on its towpath.

Key

Grade Criteria[1]
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest

Buildings

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
Barn opposite Eight Acre Lane
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17th century The barn originated as a house. It is in limestone with sandstone dressings and a slate roof, and is in two storeys. The building contains a wide entrance and mullioned windows. To the left is a later lean-to extension.[lower-alpha 1][2] II
Storrs Farmhouse
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1666 A stone house with a slate roof, in two storeys with an attic. At the west end is a gabled extension to the north. The windows are mullioned, and there is a stair window to the left of the front door.[3] II
The Castle
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Late 17th century A limestone house with sandstone dressings and a slate roof, in two storeys with attics. In the centre is a three-storey gabled porch flanked by bays with gabled dormers. The windows are mullioned, and there is a continuous drip course above the ground floor openings.[4] II*
Hill Top Farmhouse
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Late 17th century The farmhouse is in limestone with sandstone dressings and a slate roof. There are later extensions at the rear. Most of the windows are mullioned. Inside the house is a bressumer.[5] II
Yew Tree Cottage and Yew Tree House
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Late 17th century A pair of pebbledashed houses with a slate roof, in two storeys with attics. Some of the windows are sashes and others are modern. No. 23 has a porch roofed by two sandstone flags, a doorway with chamfered jambs, and a 17th-century door. The attic contains a gabled dormer containing a four-light mullioned window. No. 21. to the left, has a wooden porch.[6] II
Leighton Furnace Barn
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1718 The barn is in limestone with a slate roof. Its west wall contains blocked doorways, and in the east wall are various openings, including doors, windows, and a wide entrance with a segmental arch. In the south gable end is a pitching hole.[7] II
3 and 5 Silverdale Road
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1719 Originally one house, later divided into two cottages, in pebbledashed stone with a slate roof and in two storeys. No. 5 has sash windows and a fire window, The windows in No, 3, to the left, are modern.[8] II
2 and 3 Storrs Grange
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Late 18th century (probable) A limestone barn with some sandstone dressings. On the west front is a wide entrance with a segmental arch, a gabled extension to the left, and a lean-to extension to the right. There are various openings, including windows, doors and ventilation slits.[lower-alpha 2][9] II
Browfoot Farmhouse
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Late 18th century (possible) A stone house with a slate roof, incorporating 17th-century material. It has two storeys and four bays. The doorway has a moulded surround, a four-centred head, and a lintel inscribed with initials and the date.[10] II
Barn, Hilderstone
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Late 18th century (probable) The building originated as a mill. It is in limestone and cobble and has a slate roof. There are two storeys with an attic, and two gables facing the road. It is on a sloping site and at the rear is a first floor wide entrance with a slated canopy. There are various openings on the other faces, some of which have been blocked or altered.[lower-alpha 3][11] II
Yealand Road Bridge,
(No.142)
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Yealand Road Bridge - geograph.org.uk - 1308539.jpg
1819 The bridge carries Tarn Lane over the Lancaster Canal. It is in limestone and consists of a single semi-elliptical arch with a projecting keystone.. The bridge has a solid parapet with a flat top.[12] II
Moss Bridge,
(No.143)
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1819 An accommodation bridge over the Lancaster Canal. It is in limestone and consists of a single semi-elliptical arch with chamfered voussoirs and a projecting keystone.[13] II
Milestone
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1819 The milestone is on the towpath of the Lancaster Canal. It is in sandstone and has a rectangular plan with a rounded top. On the faces are sunken ovals containing numbers.[14] II
Cinderbarrow Farmhouse
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Early 19th century The house is pebbledashed with a hipped slate roof. There are two storeys, and a symmetrical three-bay front with a Tuscan porch. The windows are sashes.[15] II
Hilderstone and Cottages
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Early 19th century A pebbledashed house with two cottages to the north. They have sandstone dressings and slate roofs, and are in two storeys with sash windows. The house has three bays, the southern cottage has two bays, and the northern cottage has three. The house has a doorway with a cornice hood, and the south wall is partly slate-hung containing a stair window with a semicircular head.[16] II

Notes and references

Notes

  1. Street View in June 2009 shows that it has been converted back into residential use.
  2. Street View in June 2009 shows that the barn has been converted for domestic use.
  3. Street View in August 2010 shows that the barn has been converted for domestic use.

Citations

Sources