Mann (military rank)

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For other uses, see Mann (disambiguation).
File:Rank insignia of the Schutzstaffel 1930.png
SS rank insignia patterns from 1933.

Mann (German for "man", "male", "husband", or "fellow"), was a paramilitary rank used by several Nazi Party paramilitary organizations between 1925 and 1945. The rank is most often associated with the SS, and also as a rank of the SA where Mann was the lowest enlisted rank and was the equivalent of a private.[1][2]

In 1938, with the rise of the SS-Verfügungstruppe (later renamed the Waffen-SS), the SS changed the rank of SS-Mann to Schütze, although it still retained the original SS rank of Mann for the Allgemeine-SS (general SS). The rank of Mann was junior to SS-Sturmmann.

In most Nazi Party organizations, the rank of Mann held no distinctive insignia. Some groups, however, granted a minor form of rank insignia such as a blank collar patch or simple shoulder board to denote the rank of Mann.[3] (see right: SS rank insignia pattern from 1933)

Even lower ranks, e.g. Bewerber, Jungmann, Anwärter, Vollanwärter, were established in the mid-1930s as a recruit or candidate position, held by an individual seeking an appointment as a Mann in a Nazi Party paramilitary organization.[1]

Insignia

Candidate status
  • SS-Bewerber (Staffel-Bewerber)
  • SS-Jungmann (Staffel-Jungmann)
  • SS-Anwärter (Staffel-Anwärter)
  • SS-Vollanwärter (Staffel-Vollanwärter)
1st rank Allgemeine SS
SS-Mann
2nd rank
no equivalent
3rd rank
SS-Sturmmann
Volunteer for joining the Waffen-SS
  • SS-Bewerber (Staffel-Bewerber)
  • SS-Jungmann (Staffel-Jungmann)
  • SS-Anwärter (Staffel-Anwärter)
1st Rank Waffen-SS
SS-Schütze
2nd rank
SS-Oberschütze
3rd rank
SS-Sturmmann
Candidate status
SA-Anwärter
1st SA rank
SA-Mann
2nd rank
no equivalent
3rd rank
SA-Sturmmann
person liable to military service
Wehrmacht
1st Wehrmacht rank
Soldat
2nd rank
Oberschütze
3rd rank
Gefreiter

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 McNab 2009, p. 30.
  2. McNab (II) 2009, p. 15.
  3. Flaherty 2004, p. 148.

Bibliography

External links