March for Our Lives

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March for Our Lives
Date March 24, 2018 (2018-03-24)
Location Washington, D.C. and over 800 other US cities
Type Left-wing activism; restricting or banning gun ownership
Theme Support of gun control and banning firearms; many other progressive causes also mentioned
Cause Pre-planned anti-Second Amendment campaign; co-opted by Parkland school shooting
Organized by Members of Never Again MSD, in cooperation with Everytown for Gun Safety
Participants 1.2+ million participants across the United States; left-wing satellite and support events internationally.[1][2]
Website {{#property:P856}}

March for Our Lives was an almost entirely left-wing political demonstration that opposed widespread or unlicensed gun ownership in the USA, and demanded to legally restrict or outlaw privately owned firearms. It took place on March 24, 2018, in Washington, D.C., with over 800 sibling events throughout the United States, and numerous left-wing support events around the world.[3][4] It relied on a large number of student participants for media impact. Progressive political organizers from Never Again MSD planned the march in collaboration with Everytown for Gun Safety, with extensive support from other liberal organizations.[5] The event was hastily adapted to make use of the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting for political effect.[6]

Protesters demanded a nationwide gun control program, starting with universal background checks on all gun sales, raising the federal age of gun ownership and possession to the age of 21,[7] restricting or banning gun show sales, a Federal Assault Weapons Ban, and a ban on the sale of high-capacity magazines in the United States.[8] Later, guns might be outlawed entirely, though the organizers privately admitted that was a long way off. Turnout was claimed to be between 1.2 to 2 million people in the United States,[9][10][11] making it one of the largest left-wing protests in American history.[1]

Planning

The initially planned rally was hastily repurposed and expanded after the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. On February 14, Cameron Kasky, a junior at the school, made an event announcement.[12] The "Never Again" campaign was then created.[5] Emma González and David Hogg, also survivors of the shooting, have been vocal supporters of the march.[13]

Organizers filed a permit application with the National Park Service during the week of February 23, and expected as many as 500,000 people to attend.[14] However the National Mall, which was the planned site of the main march in Washington, D.C. was reportedly already booked for March 24; the application, filed by an unidentified local student group, claimed it was for a talent show.[15][16] A permit was later obtained for Pennsylvania Avenue.[17] The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority arranged for extra trains for the march.[18]

The Enough! National School Walkout was organized for the one month anniversary of the Stoneman Douglas shooting, and inspired widespread and enthusiastic student participation[19] in more than 3,000 schools across the United States[20] and nearly one million students.[21] Thousands of anti-Trump students staged a rally in Washington D.C. with their backs to the White House.[22][23] After the successful walkout, Hogg's account posted a tweet[24] that condemned the National Rifle Association, asking "What if our politicians weren't the bitch of the NRA?", and ending with a promotion for the upcoming March.[25]

Celebrity and corporate support

Amal and George Clooney donated $500,000 to support the march and announced they would attend. Oprah Winfrey matched the Clooney donation to support the march.[26][27] Jeffrey Katzenberg and his wife Marilyn also contributed $500,000.[28] Film director and producer Steven Spielberg and actress Kate Capshaw Spielberg donated $500,000, also matching the donation of the Clooneys.[29] Gucci donated $500,000 towards the march.[30] Other people and organizations offering support have included Justin Bieber,[31] Gabby Giffords, Lauren Jauregui, Alyssa Milano, Moms Demand Action, Amy Schumer, St. Vincent, Harry Styles,[32] Hayley Williams,[33][34] Paul McCartney,[35] Kanye West, and Kim Kardashian.[36][37] John Legend and Chrissy Teigen donated $25,000.[38] Jimmy Fallon pledged to attend with his family.[39] Samantha Bee interviewed particpants.[40] Jim Jefferies interviewed participants in San Diego.[41]

James Corden promoted the March for Our Lives event.[42] Lyft announced their support of the rallies and stated that their company would provide free rides for those attending demonstrations.[43] Dating app Bumble announced that they were supporting the NeverAgain movement by banning all images of firearms on their dating application.[44]

John Cena and Millie Bobby Brown supported the March for Our Lives event at the Kids Choice Awards.[45]

Locations

Participation

March for Our Lives was among the biggest so-called "youth" protests since the Vietnam War era, though most participants were older.[46] Estimates of participation at the main event in Washington, D.C., range from 200,000 to 800,000.[47]

The pre-arranged main speakers were all high schoolers or younger,[48] including Marjory Stoneman Douglas students Cameron Kasky, David Hogg, Delaney Tarr, Sarah Chadwick, Alex Wind, Jaclyn Corin, Ryan Deitsch, Aalayah Eastmond, Sam Fuentes, and Emma González.[49][50] Other participants included Naomi Wadler, a black elementary school student in Alexandria, Virginia,[51][52] Trevon Bosley from Chicago, whose brother was shot and killed in black gang violence,[53] Edna Chavez, a pro-immigrant high school student from Los Angeles,[54] and Zion Kelly, whose twin brother was shot and killed during an armed robbery.[55] Yolonda Reene King, granddaughter of Martin Luther King Jr., also made an appearance.[56]

González, after briefly speaking and naming the 17 victims, stood silent for over four minutes, after which a cellphone alarm went off and she announced that it was the six minute and twenty second point in her speech, equal to the length of the Parkland shooting.[57][58][59] Her speech and emotional moment of silence was praised by many mainstream media organizations as one of the "most memorable"[60] and "powerful" moments in the day's events.[61]

Singers Ariana Grande, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Ben Platt, Miley Cyrus, Jennifer Hudson, Andra Day, Common, Selena Gomez, Lady Gaga and Demi Lovato joined marchers in Washington, D.C.[50][62]

International support events

There was widespread international opposition to the USA's Second Amendment, and to gun rights in general. International progressive and socialist organizations arranged rallies and events near US embassies and other sites on the day of the protest around the world.

Locations

Canada

In British Columbia, marches were planned in Vancouver and Victoria.[63] Marches were set to take place in Calgary and Edmonton, Alberta.[63] Students from R.D. Parker Collegiate in Thompson, Manitoba, were planning to march.[63]

In Ontario, marches were planned in Ottawa,[64] Guelph, Kitchener,[63] Stratford,[65] Toronto,[66] and Waterloo.[67] In Quebec marches were planned in Montreal, Westmount,[68] Quebec City, and Sherbrooke.[63] New Brunswick was set to have a march in Fredericton.[63] Newfoundland and Labrador planned a march to take place in St. John's.[63]

Africa

Marches were planned in Accra, Ghana;[69] and Mozambique.[70]

Asia

Jewish students who had been near the Parkland shooting spoke at the rally in Tel Aviv, Israel, which took place at the U. S. Embassy.[71] Marches were planned for Hong Kong; Mumbai, India; and Tokyo and Okinawa, Japan.[64]

Europe

Protests were held in Paris, Amsterdam, Majorca, Copenhagen,;[72] and Brussels.[73][74][75]

In Germany, left-wing activists protested in Berlin,[76] Hamburg,[76] Frankfurt,[77] Friedrichshafen, Heidelberg, Munich, and Wiesbaden.[78] Events were also scheduled in: Reykjavík,[79] Barcelona,[80] Oslo,[80] Stockholm,[77] and Geneva.

In the United Kingdom, hundreds of left-wing activists, some of whom also called for increased immigration from the Third world, marched outside the US embassy in London.[81] Demonstrations were also planned in Belfast[82] and London.[74] In Scotland, relatives of the Dunblane massacre victims joined a demonstration outside the US consulate in Edinburgh.[83]

Oceania

Marches were planned for Melbourne, Brisbane, Canberra,[84] and Sydney, Australia.[85] New Zealand planned marches in Albert Park, Auckland; Parliament House, Wellington; Cathedral Square, Christchurch; and Union Hall at the University of Otago, Dunedin.[86]

South America

In Argentina, a march was planned in Buenos Aires.[64]

Responses

On March 21, NRA TV host Grant Stinchfield stated that "March for Our Lives is backed by radicals with a history of violent threats, language and actions". However, there was widespread progressive and left-wing media support for the event. The Washington Post reported that there were many Democrats encouraging the marchers, and many of them, including candidates for office, participated from the sidelines in the march, but few Republicans did similarly.

While the march was occurring, the NRA posted a membership drive video on their Facebook page, declaring that the "protests aren't spontaneous. Gun-hating billionaires and Hollywood elites are manipulating and exploiting children as part of their plan to DESTROY the Second Amendment". Another video dubbed "A March for Their Lies" was uploaded to YouTube featuring Colion Noir, in which he described the planned rally as a "carnival of a march". Noir also said in the video that there is an "agenda that's a million times bigger than the guns".[87]

Former Republican senator and presidential candidate Rick Santorum criticized the Parkland activists, but Barack Obama said that he was "so inspired by all the young people", stating: "Keep at it. You're leading us forward. Nothing can stand in the way of millions of voices calling for change."[88]

On social media, a GIF of Emma González tearing up a copy of the U.S. Constitution was circulated, doctored from original video of González tearing up a shooting target sign. Actor and conservative commentator Adam Baldwin defended this political satire.[89][90]

Also see

References

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