National Democracy (Czechoslovakia)

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National Democracy
Národní Demokracie
President Dr. Karel Kramář
Founded March 25, 1919 (1919-03-25)
Dissolved October 27, 1934 (1934-10-27)
Merger of Free-minded National Party, and other minors
Merged into National Unification
Headquarters Prague, Bohemia, Czechoslovakia
Newspaper The National Newspaper
Ideology National liberalism[1][2]
National conservatism[2]
Czechoslovak nationalism[2]
Political position Right-wing
International affiliation None
Colours Blue
Politics of Czech Republic
Political parties
Elections

The National Democracy (Czech: Národní demokracie), called also Czechoslovak National Democracy (Czech: Československá národní demokracie), was a First Republic right-wing political party in Czechoslovakia.

History

The party was established in 1918 by a merger of the Free-minded National Party ("Young Czechs") and several smaller parties, and was initially known as the Czech Constitutional Democratic Party.[3] It formed the first provisional government led by Karel Kramář, and the following year it was renamed the National Democracy.[3]

In 1935 the party merged with the National League and the National Front to form the National Unification.[3]

Electoral results

Chamber of Deputies
Election year # of
overall votes
 % of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/– Leader
1920 387,552 (#6) 6.25
19 / 281
Karel Kramář
1925 284,628 (#12) 4.1
13 / 300
Decrease 6
Karel Kramář
1929 359,547 (#9) 4.9
15 / 300
Increase 2
Karel Kramář
1935 458,351 (#8) 5.6
17 / 300
Increase 2
Karel Kramář
Senate
Election year # of
overall votes
 % of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/– Leader
1920 354,561 (#6) 6.78
10 / 142
Karel Kramář
1925 256,360 (#11) 4.2
7 / 150
Decrease 3
Karel Kramář
1929 325,023 (#9) 5.0
8 / 150
Increase 1
Karel Kramář
1935 410,095 (#8) 5.6
9 / 150
Increase 1
Karel Kramář

References

  1. Suppan, Arnold (2004). Catholic People's Parties in East Central Europe: The Bohemian Lands and Slovakia. Political Catholicism in Europe 1918-1945. 1. Routledge. p. 179.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Hloušek, Vít; Kopeček, Lubomír (2010). Origin, Ideology and Transformation of Political Parties: East-Central and Western Europe Compared. Farnham, Surrey and Burlington, VT: Ashgate. p. 165.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Vincent E McHale (1983) Political parties of Europe, Greenwood Press, p145 ISBN 0-313-23804-9