Portal:Anime and Manga

From Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core
(Redirected from Portal:Anime and manga)
Jump to: navigation, search

Anime and manga portal

Template:/box-header

Shortcuts:
Wikipe-tan sailor fuku.png

Anime (アニメ?) refers to the animation style originated in Japan. It is characterized by distinctive characters and backgrounds (hand-drawn or computer-generated) that visually and thematically set it apart from other forms of animation. Storylines may include a variety of fictional or historical characters, events, and settings. Anime is aimed at a broad range of audiences and consequently, a given series may have aspects of a range of genres. Anime is most frequently broadcast on television or sold on DVDs and other media, either after their broadcast run or directly as original video animation (OVA). Console and computer games sometimes also feature segments or scenes that can be considered anime.

Manga (漫画?) is Japanese for "comics" or "whimsical images". Manga developed from a mixture of ukiyo-e and Western styles of drawing, and took its current form shortly after World War II. Manga, apart from covers, is usually published in black and white but it is common to find introductions to chapters to be in color, and is read from top to bottom and then right to left, similar to the layout of a Japanese plain text. Financially, manga represented in 2005 a market of ¥24 billion in Japan and one of $180 million in the United States. Manga was the fastest growing segment of books in the United States in 2005.

Anime and manga share many characteristics, including: exaggerating (in terms of scale) of physical features, to which the reader presumably should pay most attention (best known being "large eyes"), "dramatically shaped speech bubbles, speed lines and onomatopoeic, exclamatory typography..." Some manga, a small amount of the total output, is adapted into anime, often with the collaboration of the original author. Computer games can also give rise to anime. In such cases, the stories are often compressed and modified to fit the format and appeal to a wider market. Popular anime franchises sometimes include full-length feature films, and some have been adapted into live-action films and television programs. Template:/box-footer

Featured article

Gin Tama is a Japanese manga written and illustrated by Hideaki Sorachi and serialized, beginning on December 8, 2003, in Shueisha's Weekly Shōnen Jump. Set in an Edo which has been conquered by aliens named Amanto, the plot follows life from the point of view of samurai Gintoki Sakata, who works as a freelancer alongside his friends Shinpachi Shimura and Kagura in order to pay the monthly rent. Sorachi added the science fiction setting to develop characters to his liking after his editor suggested doing a historical series.

The manga has been licensed by Viz Media in North America. In addition to publishing the individual volumes of the series, Viz serialized its first chapters in their Shonen Jump manga anthology. It debuted in the January 2007 issue, and was serialized at a rate of one chapter a month. An original video animation (OVA) of Gin Tama by Sunrise was featured at Jump Festa 2006 Anime Tour in 2005. This was followed by a full anime series which debuted on April 4, 2006 in TV Tokyo and is ongoing as of 2009. Although the anime episodes did not air in North America, the website Crunchyroll is streaming the series on its site. Besides the anime series, there have been various light novels and video games based on Gin Tama.

Featured biography

Himura Kenshin (緋村 剣心), known as Kenshin Himura in the English-language anime dubs, is a fictional character from the Rurouni Kenshin universe created by Nobuhiro Watsuki. He is the main protagonist of the manga and anime series, as well as the related media in the franchise. When creating Kenshin, Watsuki designed him to be the physical opposite of Hiko Seijūrō, a character that appears in Watsuki's first one-shot manga, "Crescent Moon in the Warring States"; a character with the same name appears in Rurouni Kenshin as Kenshin's swordsmanship teacher.

Kenshin's story is set in a fictional version of Japan during the Meiji period. Kenshin is a former legendary assassin known as "Hitokiri Battōsai" (人斬り抜刀斎?). The term refers to an assassin and translates as "manslayer." Within the Rurouni Kenshin universe "Battōsai" refers to someone who has mastered battōjutsu. Assassins during the bakumatsu adopted professional names; for instance Kawakami Gensai was known as Hitokiri Gensai and as The Unsheather on the Japanese kanzenban covers. At the end of the Bakumatsu, he becomes a wandering samurai, now wielding a sakabatō (逆刃刀?, lit. "reverse-blade sword"), a katana that has the cutting edge on the inwardly curved side of the sword, thus being nearly incapable of killing. Kenshin wanders the countryside of Japan offering protection and aid to those in need, as atonement for the murders he once committed as an assassin. In Tokyo, he meets a young woman named Kamiya Kaoru, who invites him to live in her dojo despite learning about Kenshin's past. Throughout the series, Kenshin begins to establish lifelong relationships with many people, including ex-enemies, while dealing with his fair share of enemies, new and old. Through these encounters and relationships, Kenshin begins to find true atonement for his past enabling him to fully conquer his "Battōsai" nature.

Featured list

Hitohira is a Japanese animated television series. The episodes are directed by Akira Nishimori and produced by the Japanese animation studio XEBEC M2 and Genco. They are based on the manga of the same name by Izumi Kirihara. Hitohira revolves around a group of young high school students and the growth they experience due to the influence of those around them.

The twelve episodes of the anime aired from March 28, 2007 to June 13, 2007 on AT-X, Chiba TV, Sun TV, TV Aichi, TV Kanagawa and TV Saitama. Six DVD compilations, each containing two episodes of the series, have been released by Media Factory between June 22, 2007 and November 22, 2007. Two pieces of theme music are used for the episodes: one opening theme and one ending theme.

Selected picture

An artwork depicting Shōnen-ai
Credit: Sen Cross, Hiji and Ryo at Animexx

An artwork depicting Shōnen-ai. Unlike Yaoi mangas, Shōnen-ai mangas focus more on romance and do not include explicit sexual content, although they may include implicit sexual content.

On this day...

October 19:

Manga serialization

OVA/ONA series

Television series and specials


Did you know

Template:/box-header

Template:/box-footer

Template:/box-header

General

Anime and manga fandom • Anime convention • Anime industry • Cosplay • Dōjinshi • History of anime • History of manga

Demographic groups

Children • Josei • Seinen • Shōnen • Shōjo

Genres

Ecchi • Harem • Magical girl • Mecha • Yaoi • Yuri • Hentai

Lists

Anime companies • Anime conventions • Anime & manga video games • Best-selling manga • Licensed manga • Longest-running anime and manga • Manga magazines Template:/box-footer

Template:/box-header

Template:/box-footer

Template:/box-header

Anime

Anime on Wikinews     Anime on Wikiquote     Anime on Wikibooks     Anime on Wikisource     Anime on Wiktionary     Anime on Wikimedia Commons
News Quotations Manuals & Texts Texts Definitions Images & Media
Wikinews-logo.svg
Wikiquote-logo.svg
Wikibooks-logo.svg
Wikisource-logo.svg
Wiktionary-logo-en.svg
Commons-logo.svg

Manga

Manga on Wikinews     Manga on Wikiquote     Manga on Wikibooks     Manga on Wikisource     Manga on Wiktionary     Manga on Wikimedia Commons
News Quotations Manuals & Texts Texts Definitions Images & Media
Wikinews-logo.svg
Wikiquote-logo.svg
Wikibooks-logo.svg
Wikisource-logo.svg
Wiktionary-logo-en.svg
Commons-logo.svg

Template:/box-footer

Purge page cache