Portal:British Army

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The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. It came into being with unification of the governments and armed forces of England and Scotland into the Kingdom of Great Britain in the Acts of Union 1707. The new British Army incorporated regiments that had already existed in England and Scotland and was controlled by the War Office from London. As of 2006, the British Army includes roughly 107,730 active members and 38,460 Territorial Army members. The professional British Army has also been referred to as the Regular Army since the creation of the Territorial Army. The British Army is deployed in many of the world's war zones as part of a fighting force and in United Nations peacekeeping forces.

In contrast to the Royal Navy, Royal Marines and Royal Air Force, the British Army does not include "Royal" in its title, because of its roots as a collection of disparate units, many of which do bear the "Royal" prefix, such as the Royal Artillery and the Royal Engineers. Template:/box-footer

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Map of the Western Front
Following the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, the German army opened the Western Front by first invading Luxembourg and Belgium, then gaining military control of important industrial regions in France. The tide of the advance was dramatically turned with the Battle of the Marne. Both sides then dug in along a meandering line of fortified trenches, stretching from the North Sea to the Swiss frontier with France. This line remained essentially unchanged for most of the war.

Between 1915 and 1917 there were several major offensives along this front. The attacks employed massive artillery bombardments and massed infantry advances. However, a combination of entrenchments, machine gun nests, barbed wire, and artillery repeatedly inflicted severe casualties on the attackers and counter attacking defenders. As a result, no significant advances were made. In an effort to break the deadlock, this front saw the introduction of new military technology, including poison gas, aircraft, and tanks. But it was only after the adoption of improved tactics that some degree of mobility was restored. In spite of the generally stagnant nature of this front, this theater would prove decisive. The inexorable advance of the Allied armies in 1918 persuaded the German commanders that defeat was inevitable, and the government was forced to sue for conditions of an armistice.

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Portrait of General Sir John Moore
Sir John Moore, KB (November 13, 1761 – January 16, 1806) was a British soldier and General.

He was born in Glasgow, the son of John Moore, a doctor and writer, and the older brother of Vice Admiral Sir Graham Moore Graham Moore, (1764 - 1843) . He attended Glasgow High School, but at the age of eleven joined his father and Douglas, the young 16 year old 8th Duke of Hamilton, (1756 - 1799), his father pupil, on a grand tour of France, Italy and Germany, This included a two-year stay in Geneva, where Moore's education continued.

He joined the British Army in 1776 as an ensign in the 51st Foot then based in Minorca. He first saw action in 1778 during the American Revolutionary War as a lieutenant in the 82nd under the 8th Duke of Hamilton. In 1783 he returned to Britain and in 1784 he was elected to Parliament as the Member for Lanark, Selkirk, Peebles and Linlithgow, a seat he held until 1790.

In 1787 he was made Major and joined the 60th briefly before returning to the 51st. In 1791 his unit was assigned to the Mediterranean and he was involved in campaigning in Corsica and was wounded at Calvi. He was given a Colonelcy and became Adjutant-General to Sir Charles Stuart. Friction between Moore and the new British viceroy of Corsica led to his recall and posting to the West Indies under Sir Ralph Abercromby.

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The Queen's Royal Lancers is a cavalry regiment of the British Army. It was formed in 1993 by the amalgamation of two other regiments:

From its formation, the regiment served in the armoured role with first Challenger 1, then Challenger 2. However, in 2005, as part of the re-organisation of the army, the regiment started converting to the formation reconnaissance role, re-equipping with the FV107 Scimitar armoured reconnaissance vehicle.

The regiment is organised into a total of four squadrons, each of which perpetuates one of the antecedent regiments:

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Selected equipment

AT4 rocket launcher.jpg

The AT4 (or AT-4) is a portable one-shot anti-tank weapon built in Sweden by Saab Bofors Dynamics (previously Bofors Anti Armour Systems). In the U.S. and NATO inventory it replaces the M72 LAW (Light Anti-armor Weapon). Saab has had considerable sales success with the AT4, making it one of the most common light anti-tank weapons in the world. It is intended to give infantry units a means to destroy or disable armored vehicles and fortifications they may encounter (though it is not generally sufficient to defeat a modern main battle tank). The launcher and projectile are manufactured pre-packed as a single unit, and the launcher is discarded after use.

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Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg
Ensign of the Royal Air Force.svg
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Royal Navy RAF United Kingdom

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FA A. E. J. Collins

FA Arthur Ernest Percival

FA Battle of Albuera

FA Battle of Arras (1917)

FA Battle of Barrosa

FA Battle of Blenheim

FA Battle of Greece

FA Battle of Schellenberg

FA British anti-invasion preparations of World War II

FA Battle of Ramillies

FA Frederick Russell Burnham

FA Invasion of Normandy

FA Crawford expedition

FA Operation Varsity

FA Isaac Brock

FA Issy Smith

FA John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough

FA Peterloo Massacre

FA Pontiac's Rebellion

FA Robert Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell

FA Siege of Malakand

FA Victoria Cross

FA War of the Fifth Coalition

FA Webley Revolver

FA Western Front (World War I)

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Portal:British Army
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Battle of Tug ArganA ForceAnglo-Norwegian Joint CommitteeArmy Motor ReserveArmy Regulation BillThomas Best (soldier)Francis BlanchainRichard BonythonBernard Brocas (Royalist)Cannon KopjeCombined Operations DirectorateDonkeymanDublin BrigadeHumphrey GaleGeneral Service Enlistment ActInfantry Junior Leaders BattalionCharles Morgan (army officer)John Norris (army officer)Operation RayonDonat Henchy O'BrienOperation SharkRadfan uprisingRoyal Sicilian VolunteersThree-Two BattalionNarendra Bir SinghThirty CommitteePaul Mainwaring JonesSiege of CartagenaCounty Galway VolunteersGurkha Security Guards LimitedKeeni-Meeni ServicesLifeguard (mercenary company)James Patterson StewardSaladin SecurityTrident MaritimeEuan McPherson (commander in Lord Loudoun's army) • Headquarters Theatre Troops (British Army current unit) • Remote Radar Head (RAF radar station classification) • Landing at Kesang RiverLanding at PontianBattle of Plaman Mapu
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Battle of GermantownRoulementAddiscombe Military AcademyHome Defence ExecutiveOperation AccumulatorWilliam RowanRichard James DacresFrederick HainesCádiz Expedition (1625)Battle of Skerki BankCádiz ExpeditionRichard Clement MoodyArthur Reid LempriereHenry Spencer PalmerRoyal Engineers, Columbia detachment8x57mm IS (nomenclature as "7.92mm" by Poland and GB?) • William Vavasour
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Siege of Calcutta
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