Portal:British Army

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Flag of the British Army (1938-present).svg

The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. It came into being with unification of the governments and armed forces of England and Scotland into the Kingdom of Great Britain in the Acts of Union 1707. The new British Army incorporated regiments that had already existed in England and Scotland and was controlled by the War Office from London. As of 2006, the British Army includes roughly 107,730 active members and 38,460 Territorial Army members. The professional British Army has also been referred to as the Regular Army since the creation of the Territorial Army. The British Army is deployed in many of the world's war zones as part of a fighting force and in United Nations peacekeeping forces.

In contrast to the Royal Navy, Royal Marines and Royal Air Force, the British Army does not include "Royal" in its title, because of its roots as a collection of disparate units, many of which do bear the "Royal" prefix, such as the Royal Artillery and the Royal Engineers. Template:/box-footer

Selected article

Webley Revolver (Mark IV)
The Webley Revolver (also known/referred to as the Webley Break-Top Revolver or Webley Self-Extracting Revolver) was, in various marks, the standard issue service pistol for the armed forces of the United Kingdom, the British Empire, and the Commonwealth from 1887 until 1963.

The Webley service revolver was most notably used in World War I (as the Webley Mk VI), although it had actually been adopted in 1887 (as the Webley Mk I) and risen to prominence during the Boer War of 1899-1902 (as the Webley Mk IV), and were of the "top-break" variety, with the advantage of also being self-extracting; breaking the revolver open for reloading also operates the extractor, removing the spent cartridges from the cylinder.

The British company Webley and Scott (P. Webley & Son before merger with W & C Scott) produced a range of revolvers from the late 19th to late 20th centuries. Early models such as the Webley-Green army model 1879 and the Webley-Pryse model were first made during the 1870s. The best-known are the range of military revolvers, which were in service use across two World Wars and numerous colonial conflicts, but Webley & Scott also produced a number of short-barrel solid-frame revolvers, including the Webley RIC (Royal Irish Constabulary) model and the British Bulldog, designed to be carried in a coat pocket for self-defence.

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Selected biography

The Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany (Frederick Augustus; 16 August 1763–5 January 1827) was a member of the Hanoverian and British Royal Family, the second eldest child, and second son, of King George III. From 1820 until his death in 1827, he was the heir presumptive to his elder brother, King George IV, both to the United Kingdom and the Kingdom of Hanover.

George III decided that his second son would pursue an army career and had him gazetted colonel in 1780. From 1781 to 1787, Prince Frederick lived in Hanover, where he drank and fornicated immoderately yet still found time to earnestly attend the manoeuvres of the Austrian and Prussian armies and studied (along with his younger brothers) at the University of Göttingen.

As an inexperienced young military officer, he presided over the unsuccessful campaign against the forces of France in the Low Countries, during the conflict which followed the French Revolution. Later, as commander-in-chief of the British army, he made amends for his initial military setbacks during the late 1790s by brilliantly reorganising his nation's forces, putting in place administrative reforms which enabled the redcoats to defeat Napoleon's crack troops. He also founded the United Kingdom's renowned military college, Sandhurst, which promoted the professional, merit-based training of future commissioned officers. The Duke is best remembered today as the inspiration for the nursery rhyme, "The Grand Old Duke of York".

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Selected unit

British Army Spartan TAnk (as used by the Light Dragoons)
The Light Dragoons (LD) is a cavalry regiment in the British Army.

It was formed in 1992 from the amalgamation of two regiments, becoming the first dragoon regiment in the British Army for over twenty years:

The Light Dragoons are a Formation Reconnaissance Regiment with a history in the reconnaissance role which dates back to the early 18th Century. Currently based in Swanton Morley, Norfolk, they are commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Angus Watson MBE.

They are highly experienced operationally with 14 tours of the Balkans during the 1990’s. They have deployed twice to Iraq on Operation TELIC in 2003 and 2005.

C Squadron Deployed on a 6 month operational tour of duty in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, on Operation HERRICK 5 with 3 Commando Brigade , Royal Marines.

In April 2007 the majority of the Regiment including elements of HQ Squadron, B Squadron complete and specialists from D Squadron were deployed for a six month tour in Afghanistan with 12 Mechanised Brigade on Operation HERRICK 6.

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Selected equipment

The FV4034 Challenger 2 is the main battle tank (MBT) currently in service with the armies of the United Kingdom and Oman. Built by the British company Vickers Defence Systems (now part of BAE Systems Land and Armaments). The manufacturer advertises it as the world's most reliable main battle tank. As of January 2008, two Challenger 2s have been damaged and one destroyed (by a friendly fire engagement with another Challenger 2) in combat.

Challenger 2 is an extensive redesign from Challenger 1, the MBT from which it was developed. It uses the basic hull and automotive parts of its predecessor but all else is new. Fewer than 5% of components are interchangeable.

Challenger 2 has now replaced Challenger 1 in service with the British Army and is also used by the Royal Army of Oman. The UK placed orders for 127 Challenger 2 tanks in 1991 and an additional 259 in 1994. Oman ordered 18 of the tanks in 1993 and a further 20 in November 1997. Challenger 2 entered service with the British Army in 1998, with the last delivered in 2002. It is expected to remain in service until 2035. Deliveries for Oman were completed in 2001. Challenger 2 has seen operational service in Bosnia, Kosovo and Iraq (2003–present). During the 2003 invasion of Iraq, this was the only tank operating in the Gulf that did not suffer a single loss to enemy fire. In one engagement a Challenger took 14 hits from Rocket propelled grenades and from one Milan anti tank missile. The tank had to disengage for repairs and was back in action within six hours.

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Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg
Air Force Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Royal Navy RAF United Kingdom

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Selected picture

Pikemen escorting John Stuttard, Lord Mayor of London during the 2006 Lord Mayor's Show.
Credit: David Illiff
Pikemen escorting John Stuttard, Lord Mayor of London during the 2006 Lord Mayor's Show. The Pikemen and Musketeers (formed 1925, given a Royal Warrant 1955) are made up of veteran members of the Active Unit they are the personal bodyguard of the Lord Mayor of London and form his Guard on ceremonial occasions.


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FA A. E. J. Collins

FA Arthur Ernest Percival

FA Battle of Albuera

FA Battle of Arras (1917)

FA Battle of Barrosa

FA Battle of Blenheim

FA Battle of Greece

FA Battle of Schellenberg

FA British anti-invasion preparations of World War II

FA Battle of Ramillies

FA Frederick Russell Burnham

FA Invasion of Normandy

FA Crawford expedition

FA Operation Varsity

FA Isaac Brock

FA Issy Smith

FA John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough

FA Peterloo Massacre

FA Pontiac's Rebellion

FA Robert Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell

FA Siege of Malakand

FA Victoria Cross

FA War of the Fifth Coalition

FA Webley Revolver

FA Western Front (World War I)

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Portal:British Army
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Battle of Tug ArganA ForceAnglo-Norwegian Joint CommitteeArmy Motor ReserveArmy Regulation BillThomas Best (soldier)Francis BlanchainRichard BonythonBernard Brocas (Royalist)Cannon KopjeCombined Operations DirectorateDonkeymanDublin BrigadeHumphrey GaleGeneral Service Enlistment ActInfantry Junior Leaders BattalionCharles Morgan (army officer)John Norris (army officer)Operation RayonDonat Henchy O'BrienOperation SharkRadfan uprisingRoyal Sicilian VolunteersThree-Two BattalionNarendra Bir SinghThirty CommitteePaul Mainwaring JonesSiege of CartagenaCounty Galway VolunteersGurkha Security Guards LimitedKeeni-Meeni ServicesLifeguard (mercenary company)James Patterson StewardSaladin SecurityTrident MaritimeEuan McPherson (commander in Lord Loudoun's army) • Headquarters Theatre Troops (British Army current unit) • Remote Radar Head (RAF radar station classification) • Landing at Kesang RiverLanding at PontianBattle of Plaman Mapu
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Battle of GermantownRoulementAddiscombe Military AcademyHome Defence ExecutiveOperation AccumulatorWilliam RowanRichard James DacresFrederick HainesCádiz Expedition (1625)Battle of Skerki BankCádiz ExpeditionRichard Clement MoodyArthur Reid LempriereHenry Spencer PalmerRoyal Engineers, Columbia detachment8x57mm IS (nomenclature as "7.92mm" by Poland and GB?) • William Vavasour
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