Portal:Government of the United States

From Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core
Jump to: navigation, search

Template:/Header Template:/box-header

Obverse of the Great Seal of the United States
United States Congressional Seal
The Seal Of The President Of The United States
Seal of the United States Supreme Court

The federal government of the United States is the central United States governmental body, established by the United States Constitution. The federal government has three branches: the legislative, executive, and judicial. Through a system of separation of powers and the system of "checks and balances," each of these branches has some authority to act on its own, some authority to regulate the other two branches, and has some of its own authority, in turn, regulated by the other branches. The policies of the federal government have a broad impact on both the domestic and foreign affairs of the United States. In addition, the powers of the federal government as a whole are limited by the Constitution, which, per the Tenth Amendment, reserves all power not directed to the National government, to the individual states, respectively, or "to the people". The seat of the federal government is in the federal district of Washington, D.C.

Template:/box-footer

Selected article

The President of the United States is the head of state and head of government of the United States. The president leads the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States armed forces. Article II of the U.S. Constitution vests the executive power of the United States in the president and charges him with the execution of federal law, alongside the responsibility of appointing federal executive, diplomatic, regulatory, and judicial officers, and concluding treaties with foreign powers, with the advice and consent of the Senate. Since the founding of the United States, the power of the president and the federal government have substantially grown and each modern president, despite possessing no formal legislative powers beyond signing or vetoing congressionally passed bills, is largely responsible for dictating the legislative agenda of his party and the foreign and domestic policy of the United States. The president is frequently described as the most powerful person in the world. The president is elected through the Electoral College to a four-year term. Since 1951, presidents have been limited to two terms by the Twenty-second Amendment. In all, 43 individuals have served 55 four-year terms. On January 20, 2009, Barack Obama became the forty-fourth and current President.
Template:/box-header
Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States.
Photo credit: Alexander Gardner

Template:/box-footer

Template:/box-header

Obama Administration activity

Template:/box-footer

Template:/box-header2

Rodney King, victim of the police brutality that sparked the 1990 Los Angeles riots

Template:/box-footer

Template:/box-header

Legislation

Template:/box-footer

Template:/box-header

Supreme Court cases

Lower courts

Template:/box-footer

Template:/box-header {{Wikipedia:WikiProject United States/United States WikiProjects}}

Other Relevant Wikiprojects:

Full list of WikiProjects

Template:/box-footer