Portal:Philadelphia

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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is the fifth-most-populous city in the United States and the largest in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, both in area and population. Since 1854, the city has been coterminous with Philadelphia County. Philadelphia has the second-largest downtown residential population in the U.S., behind New York, just edging out Chicago. The Philadelphia metropolitan area is the fourth-largest in the U.S. by the official definition, with some 6.9 million people. Philadelphia is the central city of the Delaware Valley metropolitan area.

Philadelphia is one of the oldest and most historically significant U.S. cities. It was the nation's first capital. At the time of the American Revolution, it was the second-largest English-speaking city in the world, after only London. Into the first part of the 19th century, it was the country's most populous city and eclipsed Boston and New York City in political and social importance. Benjamin Franklin played an extraordinary role in Philadelphia's rise.

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Photo credit: Massimo Catarinella

The Italian Market is the popular name for the South 9th Street Curb Market, an area of Philadelphia featuring many grocery shops, cafes, restaurants, bakeries, cheese shops, butcher shops, etc., many with an Italian influence. It is generally considered to extend along 9th Street from Fitzwater Street at the north to Wharton Street at the south. The term Italian Market is also used to describe the surrounding neighborhood that's nestled between South Street to the North and Wharton Street to the South running a few blocks to the east and west of 9th street.

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Andy Reid is the current head coach of the Eagles after being hired in 1999.

There have been twenty head coaches of the Philadelphia Eagles. The Philadelphia Eagles are a professional American football team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Eagles joined the National Football League (NFL) as an expansion team in 1933 Currently members of the Eastern Division of the National Football Conference (NFC), the team has won three NFL titles and made two Super Bowl appearances (1980 and 2004). There have been 20 head coaches of the Philadelphia Eagles in the National Football League (NFL). Two different coaches have won NFL championships with the team: Earl Neale in 1948 and 1949, and Buck Shaw in 1960. Andy Reid is the all-time leader in games coached, wins, and in winning percentage with .611 (with at least one full season coached). Bert Bell is statistically the worst coach the Eagles have had in terms of winning percentage, with .185 win/loss percentage. Of the 20 Eagles coaches, three have been elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame: Bell, Neale, and Wayne Millner. Several former National Football League (NFL) players have been head coach for the Eagles, including Jerry Williams, Ed Khayat, and Marion Campbell. The current coach is Andy Reid, who was hired on January 11, 1999.

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Albert Alexander "Ox" Wistert.

Al Wistert is a former All-Pro American football offensive tackle in the National Football League (NFL) for the Philadelphia Eagles. He played his entire nine-year NFL career for the Eagles and became the team's captain. He played college football for the University of Michigan Wolverines. He is one of the three Wistert brothers (Alvin, Francis) who were named All-American Tackles at Michigan and later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame; they are three of only seven players who have had their numbers retired by the Michigan Wolverines football program. He was named to play in the NFL's first Pro Bowl as an Eagle, the first Michigan alumnus to be so recognized. During most of his pro career there were no football All-star games, although he was named to the league All-Pro team eight times. Wistert was inducted into the Eagles Honor Roll on September 29, 2009, along with Randall Cunningham. Wistert has an active petition campaign to pursue Pro Football Hall of Fame induction. After football, he became a successful life insurance salesman, over a 40-year career. Since retirement he has lived in California and Grants Pass, Oregon. He was married to his late wife Ellie for 61 years and has three daughters (Pam, Dianna and Kathy) and three grandchildren.

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