Robert Beale (entrepreneur)

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Robert Beale
Born United States
Residence United States
Occupation Businessman
Criminal charge Tax evasion
Criminal penalty 11 years
Criminal status Incarcerated
Children Theodore Beale

Robert Beale is a Minnesota entrepreneur, founder and former CEO of Comtrol,[1] tax protester, and convicted felon who was sentenced to 11 years and 2 months in federal prison for tax evasion, threatening a federal judge, and jumping bail.[2][3][4]

Early Life

Robert Bonine Beale; the second of five children born to Paul Latimer Beale, Sr. and Lucille Juliet Kates, Robert married Rebecca Anne Summers and they had four children.[5] He is a descendant of Captain James McDowell, who commanded a company in General Thomas Mifflin's Brigade during the American Revolutionary War.[6]

Beale graduated from MIT with a degree in Engineering, and would later serve as a research scientist from 1966 to 1973 at MIT Draper Laboratory, where he invented hydraulics for the classified Minuteman Missile project. In 1969, he publicly debated Noam Chomsky and Ascher A. Shapiro over the role of America in the war in Vietnam. At Honeywell Systems and Research Center, Beale developed guidance and control systems for the C-5A military transport, the F-15 fighter, F-14 fighter, jet engines, and advanced and lightweight torpedoes, and also patented components for a solar power plant and an electronic oxygen regulator for jet pilots.[7]

Entrepreneur

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Beale founded three companies in Minnesota, including COMTROL, which would, combined, employ 250 people and generate revenues in excess of $35 million per year. Offices were located internationally.[8]

Legal disputes

Beale was on the Minnesota board for televangelist Pat Robertson's campaign during Robertson's failed run for president in 1988. Beale also reported that he was once a major contributor and board member of Living Word Christian Center, a Brooklyn Park church which would later come under the scrutiny of the Internal Revenue Service as well.[4][9] He is also a former shareholder and board of directors member of WorldNetDaily.[10]

Beale's problems with the Internal Revenue Service began in the 1990s over a dispute involving Artist Graphics, a computer software firm Beale founded.[4] On April 30, 2008, Beale was convicted of illegally hiding $5.6 million of his salary as CEO of Comtrol to evade $1.6 million in taxes. (His original trial had been delayed 14 months when Beale skipped bail on the eve of his trial in August 2006.) He was later charged with threatening the life of the federal judge who prosecuted him and was given 11 additional months of prison time.[11][12] Beale served briefly as his own attorney at his trial.[13]

Beale is the father of publisher and writer Theodore Beale who uses the pseudonym Vox Day.

References

  1. "Comtrol". Retrieved 2010-12-05. 
  2. Furst, Randy (2007-12-30). "Ex-CEO regrets 'mission' to take on IRS". StarTribune.com. Retrieved 2010-12-05. 
  3. Tevlin, John (2008-07-16). "Robert Beale: 'God wants me to destroy the judge'". StarTribune.com. Retrieved 2010-12-05. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 "Up to 10 years in prison for millionaire tax dodger". StarTribune.com. 2008-04-30. Archived from the original on October 14, 2012. Retrieved 2010-12-05. 
  5. [1]
  6. [2]
  7. [3]
  8. [www.comtrol.com]
  9. Tevlin, John (2008-08-21). "Pastor, Brooklyn Park church fight rare IRS audit". StarTribune.com. Archived from the original on October 14, 2012. Retrieved 2010-12-05. 
  10. Farah, Joseph. "My farewell column". April 1, 2002. WorldNetDaily.com Inc. Retrieved 5 December 2010. 
  11. "Beale, three others sentenced for conspiring against federal judge | Minneapolis and St. Paul". kare11.com. 2009-02-24. Retrieved 2010-12-05. 
  12. Slater, Dan (2008-07-17). "Minnesota Men Indicted for Bizarre Plot to Intimidate Judge". Blogs.wsj.com. Retrieved 2010-12-05. 
  13. James Walsh, Star Tribune (2008-09-11). "A surreal end to tax protester's odyssey". StarTribune.com. Archived from the original on July 8, 2010. Retrieved 2010-12-05. 

External links