Saatchi Shul

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Saatchi Shul is an independent Orthodox Jewish synagogue that was founded in Maida Vale, London, England, in 1998.[1][2][3] The synagogue was founded by Charles Saatchi and Maurice Saatchi.[1][2][3][4][5] When it opened, its rabbi was Pinchas "Pini" Eliezer Dunner.[6][7][8] The rabbi shamed husbands who did not give their wives a get, a divorce document that effects a divorce, by naming them in large advertisements in London's Jewish Chronicle.[9]

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Religion, Media, and the Public Sphere. Indiana University Press. 2005. Retrieved 17 November 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. 2.0 2.1 Jeremy Stolow (2010). Orthodox by Design: Judaism, Print Politics, and the ArtScroll Revolution. University of California Press. Retrieved 17 November 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. 3.0 3.1 Todd M. Endelman (2002). The Jews of Britain, 1656 to 2000. University of California Press. Retrieved 17 November 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. Mark Slobin (2003). Fiddler on the Move: Exploring the Klezmer World Book & CD. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 17 November 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. The Jewish People Policy Planning Institute Planning Assessment, 2004-2005: The Jewish People Between Thriving and Decline. Gefen Publishing House Ltd. 2005. Retrieved 17 November 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. The Palgrave Dictionary of Anglo-Jewish History. Palgrave Macmillan. 2011. Retrieved 17 November 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. Brian Barry (2013). Culture and Equality: An Egalitarian Critique of Multiculturalism. John Wiley & Sons. Retrieved 17 November 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. Stephen W. Massil (2009). The Jewish Year Book 2009. Greenberg & Company. Retrieved 17 November 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. David Singer (2001). American Jewish Year 2001. Amer Jewish Committee. Retrieved 17 November 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links