Slime Mori Mori Dragon Quest 3

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Slime Mori Mori Dragon Quest 3: Daikaizoku to Shippodan
File:Slime Mori Mori Dragon Quest 3.jpg
Developer(s) Square Enix
Publisher(s) Square Enix
Composer(s) Koichi Sugiyama
Series Slime Mori Mori
Platforms Nintendo 3DS
Release date(s)
    Genre(s) Action role-playing
    Mode(s) Single-player, multiplayer

    Slime Mori Mori Dragon Quest 3: Daikaizoku to Shippo Dan (スライムもりもりドラゴンクエスト3 大海賊としっぽ団 Suraimu Morimori Doragon Kuesuto 3: Daikaizoku to Shippo Dan?, lit. "Slime of Gusto Dragon Quest 3: Tails Brigade and the Great Pirate") is an action-adventure game developed and published by Square Enix. It is a spinoff video game to the Dragon Quest series, and the third entry in the Slime subseries, known as Slime Morimori Dragon Quest (スライムもりもりドラゴンクエス?) in Japan. It was released in Japan for the Nintendo 3DS on November 2, 2011.[1]

    The story follows Surarin, a slime, who goes on a quest to retrieve his countries prized jewels, known as "Rainbow Orbs", from a group of pirates who have stolen them. The game sold well and was praised by critics for its charm and enjoyable gameplay.

    Gameplay

    In the game, the player controls a slime named Surarin (スラリン?). Unlike the first two games of the series, which were 2D games featuring tank battles, Slime Mori Mori Dragon Quest 3 features naval battles in a 3D environment. Also unlike the first two games, the goal is not to rescue one hundred kidnapped slimes, but to take back the "Rainbow Orbs", the treasure of the Slime Kingdom.

    The battle mechanics are similar to the previous game in the series, Dragon Quest Heroes: Rocket Slime, with the player journeying through specific game locations, fighting enemies by either flinging the slime at enemies or by fighting naval battles by loading ammunition into the ship's guns.[2] The game features multiplayer mode with up to four participants and uses Nintendo's Street Pass system.[3] An online shop called Netshop, also used in Dragon Quest IX, allows players to upgrade ship parts and buy rare items with in-game currency.[4]

    Plot

    The protagonist, Surarin lives in Slime Kingdom. One day while he return from the sailing, his kingdom is attacked by Tails Troupe, and the "Rainbow Orbs", treasures of the state, were stolen. The Boss of the Tails Troupe spreads these orbs around the world, and sets up guards to prevent them from being taken back. Surarin and his crew sail around the world retrieving the Orbs.

    Development

    The title was first announced on March 16, 2011, as the first Nintendo 3DS title of the series. It was released in Japan on November 2, 2011. It was later re-released as an Ultimate Hits title on December 6, 2012.[5] In February 2012, McDonalds released its own downloadable content for the game, featuring four exclusive items that needed to be collected to form a set.[6] The fast food chain also offered a free download to anyone with a Nintendo DS a minigame called McDonald’s Slime Ship Battle DX, which if completed would entitle the player to a one-day coupon for food and drink from the chains locations.[6]

    Reception

    Slime Mori Mori Dragon Quest 3 sold 38,859 copies in its first week, and charted as the seventh-best selling game of the week.[7] It sold over 108,000 copies by 2012.[8]

    The Japanese magazine Famitsu scored the game 37/40, while French media Consoles + gave it a 15/20.[9][10]

    References

    1. Jon Leo (3 July 2011). "Slime Mori Mori Dragon Quest 3 First Look Impressions". GameSpot. Retrieved 23 November 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
    2. Alex Sergeant (September 13, 2011). "Slime Mori Mori Dragon Quest 3 screenshots ooze charm". Destructoid. Retrieved February 12, 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
    3. Tom Goldman (March 16, 2011). "Dragon Quest Heroes: Rocket Slime Launching on 3DS With Pirates". The Escapist. Retrieved February 12, 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
    4. Spencer (October 24, 2011). "Dragon Quest IX's Online Shop Found Its Way into Rocket Slime Sequel". Siliconera. Retrieved February 11, 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
    5. "ULTIMATE HITS スライムもりもりドラゴンクエスト3 大海賊としっぽ団". Square Enix Japan. Retrieved February 12, 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
    6. 6.0 6.1 Toshitaka Tachibana (February 13, 2012). "This Isn't A Happy Meal. McDonalds Gets Exclusive 3DS Content". Kotaku. Retrieved February 12, 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
    7. Ishaan (November 9, 2011). "This Week In Sales: Tanooki Mario Spins A Tail Of Success". Siliconera. Retrieved April 11, 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
    8. "Slime Mori Mori Dragon Quest 3 Famitsu Review". Famitsu (in Japanese). Enterbrain (1206): 15. 2012. <templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
    9. "Notes et avis de la presse spécialisée sur Slime Dragon Quest 3". Gamekult. Retrieved February 12, 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
    10. "Test import de Slime MoriMori Dragon Quest 3". Consoles + (in French) (238): 88–89. 2012. <templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

    External links