Terrell County, Georgia

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Terrell County, Georgia
Map of Georgia highlighting Terrell County
Location in the U.S. state of Georgia
Map of the United States highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location in the U.S.
Founded February 16, 1856
Named for William Terrell
Seat Dawson
Largest city Dawson
Area
 • Total 338 sq mi (875 km2)
 • Land 335 sq mi (868 km2)
 • Water 2.3 sq mi (6 km2), 0.7%
Population
 • (2010) 9,315
 • Density 28/sq mi (11/km²)
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.terrellcounty-ga.com

Terrell County is a county located in the southwestern portion of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,315.[1] The county seat is Dawson.[2]

Terrell County is included in the Albany, GA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

Formed from portions of Randolph and Lee counties on February 16, 1856, by an act of the Georgia General Assembly, Terrell County is named for Dr. William Terrell (1778–1855) of Sparta, Georgia, who served in the Georgia General Assembly and the United States House of Representatives.

During the American Civil War, after Atlanta's capture by Union forces, a refugee settlement was established in Terrell County for civilians forced to flee the city. The Fosterville settlement, named after Georgia Quartermaster General Ira Roe Foster,[3] was according to author Mary Elizabeth Massey, the most ambitious refugee project approved by the Georgia General Assembly [during that period].[4] On March 11, 1865, the Georgia General Assembly authorized General Foster to continue to provide for maintenance of said exiles, or such of them as are unable by their labor to support themselves, or their families for the balance of the present year.[4]

In September 1962, an African American church was burned down after it was used for voter registration meetings.[5] Prathia Hall delivered a speech at the site of the ruins in September 1962, in which she used the repeated phrase "I have a dream". Martin Luther King is said to have built on it.[6]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 338 square miles (880 km2), of which 335 square miles (870 km2) is land and 2.3 square miles (6.0 km2) (0.7%) is water.[7]

The western and southern two-thirds of Terrell County are is located in the Ichawaynochaway Creek sub-basin of the ACF River Basin (Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin). The county's northeastern third is located in the Kinchafoonee-Muckalee sub-basin of the same larger ACF River Basin.[8]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 6,232
1870 9,053 45.3%
1880 10,451 15.4%
1890 14,503 38.8%
1900 19,023 31.2%
1910 22,003 15.7%
1920 19,601 −10.9%
1930 18,290 −6.7%
1940 16,675 −8.8%
1950 14,314 −14.2%
1960 12,742 −11.0%
1970 11,416 −10.4%
1980 12,017 5.3%
1990 10,653 −11.4%
2000 10,970 3.0%
2010 9,315 −15.1%
Est. 2014 9,132 [9] −2.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1790-1960[11] 1900-1990[12]
1990-2000[13] 2010-2013[1]

2000 census

As of the census[14] of 2000, there were 10,970 people, 4,002 households, and 2,913 families residing in the county. The population density was 33 people per square mile (13/km²). There were 4,460 housing units at an average density of 13 per square mile (5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 37.95% White, 60.69% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.09% from other races, and 0.69% from two or more races. 1.24% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,002 households out of which 33.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.10% were married couples living together, 24.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.20% were non-families. 24.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.18.

In the county the population was spread out with 28.40% under the age of 18, 9.50% from 18 to 24, 26.00% from 25 to 44, 23.20% from 45 to 64, and 13.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 88.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $26,969, and the median income for a family was $31,693. Males had a median income of $27,320 versus $19,895 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,894. About 22.70% of families and 28.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 40.50% of those under age 18 and 22.00% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 9,315 people, 3,519 households, and 2,450 families residing in the county.[15] The population density was 27.8 inhabitants per square mile (10.7/km2). There were 4,080 housing units at an average density of 12.2 per square mile (4.7/km2).[16] The racial makeup of the county was 61.2% black or African American, 36.6% white, 0.3% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.8% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.7% of the population.[15] In terms of ancestry, 8.7% were American, 5.7% were English, and 5.0% were Irish.[17]

Of the 3,519 households, 33.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.2% were married couples living together, 24.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.4% were non-families, and 26.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.11. The median age was 39.6 years.[15]

The median income for a household in the county was $27,909 and the median income for a family was $35,663. Males had a median income of $36,641 versus $25,461 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,553. About 28.2% of families and 31.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 44.4% of those under age 18 and 24.6% of those age 65 or over.[18]

Communities

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 26, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. Lisa Tendrich Frank (2008). Women in the American Civil War. ABC-CLIO. p. 113. ISBN 978-1-85109-600-8.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. 4.0 4.1 Mary Elizabeth Massey (2001). Refugee Life in the Confederacy. Louisiana State University Press. p. 246. ISBN 978-0-8071-2688-2.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. http://crdl.usg.edu/export/html/ugabma/walb/crdl_ugabma_walb_walb00067.html?Welcome
  6. Holsaert, Faith et al. Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC. University of Illinois Press, 2010, p. 180.
  7. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. "Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission Interactive Mapping Experience". Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. Retrieved 2015-11-24.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 26, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  11. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 26, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  12. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 26, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  13. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 26, 2014.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  14. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-30.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  16. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-30.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  17. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-30.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  18. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-30.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links

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