Trademark symbol

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For the Wikipedia Manual of Style guidelines, see Wikipedia:Manual of Style/Trademarks.
Trademark symbol
Punctuation
apostrophe   '
brackets [ ]  ( )  { }  ⟨ ⟩
colon :
comma ,  ،  
dash   –  —  ―
ellipsis   ...  . . .
exclamation mark  !
full stop, period .
hyphen
hyphen-minus -
question mark  ?
quotation marks ‘ ’  “ ”  ' '  " "
semicolon ;
slash, stroke, solidus /  
Word dividers
interpunct ·
space     
General typography
ampersand &
asterisk *
at sign @
backslash \
bullet
caret ^
dagger † ‡
degree °
ditto mark
inverted exclamation mark ¡
inverted question mark ¿
number sign, pound, hash, octothorpe #
numero sign
obelus ÷
multiplication sign ×
ordinal indicator º ª
percent, per mil  % ‰
plus and minus + −
equals sign =
basis point
pilcrow
prime     
section sign §
tilde ~
underscore, understrike _
vertical bar, pipe, broken bar |    ¦
Intellectual property
copyright ©
sound-recording copyright
registered trademark ®
service mark
trademark
Currency
generic currency symbol ¤

฿¢$ƒ£ ¥

Uncommon typography
asterism
hedera
index, fist
interrobang
irony punctuation
lozenge
reference mark
tie
Related
In other scripts

The trademark symbol (), in Unicode U+2122 TRADE MARK SIGN (HTML &#8482;<dot-separator> &trade;), \texttrademark in LaTeX,[1] [2] is a symbol used to indicate an assertion that the preceding mark is a trademark. It is usually used for unregistered trademarks, as opposed to the registered trademark symbol (®) which is reserved for registered trademarks.

Use of the symbol

Use of the symbol indicates an assertion that a word, image, or other sign is a trademark; it does not indicate registration. Registered trademarks are indicated using the registered trademark symbol (®), and in some jurisdictions it is unlawful or illegal to use the ® symbol with a mark which has not been registered.[3]

Trademarks versus service marks

There is a specific symbol () to indicate the assertion of a service mark (a trademark for the provision of services). The service mark symbol is less commonly used than the trademark symbol, especially outside the United States.

See also

References

  1. "The Unicode Standard 7.0, Letterlike Symbols" (PDF). Unicode, Inc. 
  2. "Character entity references in HTML 4". w3.org. 
  3. "“How to use the ® and TM Symbol”". howconceptual.com.