Trump: The Art of the Deal

From Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core
Jump to: navigation, search
"The Art of the Deal" redirects here. For the Prison Break television series episode, see Prison Break (season 3). For the 2016 parody film, see Donald Trump's The Art of the Deal: The Movie.
The Art of the Deal
File:Trump the art of the deal.jpg
Author Donald Trump
Tony Schwartz
Country United States
Language English
Genre Business
Publisher Warner Books
Publication date
November 1, 1987
Media type Print (Hardcover and Paperback)
Pages 372
ISBN 978-0446353250

Trump: The Art of the Deal is a 1987 book by business magnate Donald Trump and journalist Tony Schwartz. Part memoir and part a business advice book, it reached #1 on the New York Times Bestseller list and held a position in the list for 51 weeks.[1]

It was the first book by Donald Trump.[2] Trump was persuaded to write the book by Conde Nast owner Si Newhouse after the May 1984 issue of the Newhouse magazine GQ, with Trump appearing on the cover, sold well.[1][3] The book was co-written by journalist Tony Schwartz and published on November 1, 1987 by Warner Books.


Synopsis

In the book, Trump writes about his childhood, his work in Brooklyn prior to moving to Manhattan and building The Trump Organization out of his studio apartment, developing the Hyatt Hotels and Trump Tower, renovating Wollman Rink, and other projects.[4]

The book also contains an 11-step formula for business success inspired by Norman Vincent Peale's The Power of Positive Thinking.[1] The steps include #1 "Think Big", #7 "Get the Word Out", #10 "Contain the Costs".[1]

Copies sold

The number of copies sold has been the subject of speculation in a number of sources. Trump asserted in his 2016 Presidential run that Art of the Deal is "the No. 1 selling business book of all time."[5] Some sources report it sold over 1 million hardcover copies.[1] In a more detailed analysis by Linda Qiu in the Tampa Bay Times, other books that touch on business were found to have sold many more copies than Art of the Deal.[6] Qiu noted it was impossible to find exact sales figures, but gave a range of possibilities based on known claims and facts. Compared to six other famous business books, Art of the Deal ranked in 5th place according to their analysis; the first place book How to Win Friends and Influence People, the first self-help book ever written, outsold it by a factor of 15 times.[6] However, the four books the analysts place ahead of The Art of the Deal (How to Win Friends (self-help), 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (self-help), Rich Dad, Poor Dad (personal finance), Steve Jobs (biography) were not intended or marketed primarily as business books, and therefore Qiu's own analysis appears to contradict her claim that the Number 1 status of Art of the Deal is false.[6]

Reception

Publishers Weekly called it a "boastful, boyishly disarming, thoroughly engaging personal history".[7]

Jim Ceraghty in The National Review said the book showed "a much softer, warmer, and probably happier figure than the man dominating the airwaves today."[8]

John Paul Rollert, an ethicist writing about the book in The Atlantic, says Trump sees capitalism not as an economic system but a morality play.[9]

Criticism

Three years after the book's publication, journalist John Tierney noted Trump "appears to have ignored some of his own advice" in the book due to "well-publicized problems with his banks."[10] Trump's self-promotion, best-selling book and media celebrity status led James Brian McPherson to call him "a poster-child for the 'Greed is Good' 1980s".[11] (The phrase "Greed is Good" was from the movie Wall Street which was released a month after The Art of the Deal.)

Donald Trump's The Art of the Deal: The Movie

Aspects of the book were used as the basis for the 2016 parody film, Donald Trump's The Art of the Deal: The Movie.[12]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Timothy L. O'Brien (2005). TrumpNation: The Art of Being The Donald. Grand Central Publishing. pp. 69–70. Retrieved November 20, 2014. 
  2. Ralph Novak (February 29, 1988). "Picks and Pans Review: Trump: the Art of the Deal". People. Retrieved November 21, 2014. 
  3. GQ. May 1984. Success Issue. Donald Trump, Sandra Bernhard, Bobby Short.
  4. Trump: The Art of the Deal Paperback
  5. Mark Krotov (July 27, 2015). "Should President Obama and the Iran negotiators have read Trump: The Art of the Deal?". Melville House Publishing. Retrieved July 28, 2015. 
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Linda Qiu (July 6, 2015). "Is Donald Trump's Art of the Deal the best-selling business book of all time?". Tampa Bay Times. Retrieved July 28, 2015.  Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "qiu" defined multiple times with different content
  7. "Trump: The Art of the Deal". Publishers Weekly. December 1987. Retrieved April 26, 2016. 
  8. Jim Ceraghty (September 24, 2015). "In The Art of the Deal, Trump Shows His Soft Side". The National Review. Retrieved April 26, 2016. 
  9. John Paul Rollert (March 30, 2016). "An Ethicist Reads The Art of the Deal". The Atlantic. Retrieved April 26, 2016. 
  10. John Tierney (March 6, 1991). "'Art of the Deal,' Scaled-Back Edition". New York Times. Retrieved November 21, 2014. 
  11. James Brian McPherson (2006). Journalism at the End of the American Century, 1965-present. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 101. Retrieved November 23, 2014. 
  12. Zeitchik, Steven (February 10, 2016). "Funny or Die 'Donald Trump' filmmakers talk about making the viral parody with Johnny Depp". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 11, 2016.