United States presidential election, 2020

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United States presidential election, 2020

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538 members of the Electoral College
270 electoral votes needed to win
  No image.svg
Nominee TBD TBD
Party Democratic Republican
Home state TBD TBD
Running mate TBD TBD

350px
The electoral map for the 2020 election, based on populations from the 2010 census

President before election

TBD

Elected President

TBD

The United States presidential election of 2020, scheduled for Tuesday, November 3, 2020, will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. Voters will select presidential electors who in turn will elect a new president and vice president through the electoral college. The series of presidential primary elections and caucuses are likely to be held during the first six months of 2020. This nominating process is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots selecting a slate of delegates to a political party's nominating convention, who then in turn elect their party's presidential nominee.

No incumbent or former President is seeking office in 2016, meaning that whoever is elected in 2016 will most likely be eligible to seek re-election.

Background

Procedure

Article Two of the United States Constitution states that for a person to be elected and serve as President of the United States the individual must be a natural-born citizen of the United States, at least 35 years old and a United States resident for at least 14 years. Candidates for the presidency typically seek the nomination of one of the various political parties of the United States, in which case each party develops a method (such as a primary election) to choose the candidate the party deems best suited to run for the position. The primary elections are usually indirect elections where voters cast ballots for a slate of party delegates pledged to a particular candidate. The party's delegates then officially nominate a candidate to run on the party's behalf. The general election in November is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots for a slate of members of the Electoral College; these electors then directly elect the President and Vice President.[1][2]

Possible impact of NPVIC in 2020

Organizers predict the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (NPVIC) will be in effect by the 2020 United States presidential election. If this occurs, it may significantly alter the electoral dynamics of the contest.[3] The contract is an agreement among several states and the District of Columbia to assign their presidential electors to the winner of the national popular vote under certain conditions. The NPVIC is intended to address perceived shortcomings in the current Electoral College system.[4]

Demographic trends

The 2020 U.S. presidential election will mark the first time all members of the millennial generation will be eligible to vote.[5] The age group of what will then be persons in the 18 to 45-year-old bracket will represent 40 percent of the United States' eligible voters in 2020.[6] It has also been estimated that 15 percent of eligible voters in the 2020 U.S. presidential election will be Hispanic.[6]

Simultaneous elections

The presidential election will occur at the same time as elections to the Senate and the House of Representatives. Several states will also hold state governor and state legislative elections. Following the election, the United States House will redistribute the seats among the 50 states based on the results of the 2020 United States Census, and the states will conduct a redistricting of Congressional and state legislative districts. In most states, the governor and the state legislature conduct the redistricting (although some states have redistricting commissions), and often a party that wins a presidential election experiences a coattail effect that also helps other candidates of that party win election.[7] Therefore, the party that wins the 2020 presidential election could also win a significant advantage in the drawing of new Congressional and state legislative districts that would stay in effect until the 2032 elections.[8]

Democratic Party

Potential candidates

Potential convention sites

Republican Party

Potential candidates

Potential convention sites

Potential primary changes

Following a large amount of controversy in the 2016 Republican Primaries, many have called for a change in the way the Republican primaries are conducted. Some proposed changes include:

  • Entirely closed primaries[60]
  • Redoing the early calendar to contain more states[60]

Third party, Independent, and unaffiliated candidates

Libertarian Party

Declared Candidates

Independents/No Party Affiliation Specified

Declared Candidates

See also

References

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