Valdo Filho

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Valdo
Valdo Cândido Oliveira Filho.jpg
Valdo in 2011
Personal information
Full name Valdo Cândido Oliveira Filho
Date of birth (1964-01-12) 12 January 1964 (age 55)
Place of birth Siderópolis, Brazil
Height 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1983 Figueirense
1984–1988 Grêmio 96 (18)
1988–1991 Benfica 78 (11)
1991–1995 Paris Saint Germain 115 (10)
1995–1997 Benfica 60 (9)
1997–1998 Nagoya Grampus Eight 26 (4)
1998–2000 Cruzeiro 56 (7)
2000–2001 Santos 19 (1)
2001–2002 Atlético Mineiro 23 (1)
2002 Juventude 12 (2)
2003 São Caetano
2003–2004 Botafogo 44 (2)
Total 519 (65)
National team
1987–1993 Brazil 45 (4)
Teams managed
2009 União Rondonópolis
2011 Maringá
2012 Serra Macaense
2014–2015 MC Alger (assistant)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

† Appearances (goals)

Valdo Cândido de Oliveira Filho (born 12 January 1964), known simply as Valdo, is a former Brazilian footballer who played as a central midfielder, and a current manager.

In a senior career which spanned more than two decades, he played professionally – other than in his own country – in Portugal, France and Japan.

Having appeared more than 40 times for Brazil, Valdo represented the nation in two World Cups and as many Copa América tournaments.

Club career

Born in Siderópolis, Santa Catarina, Valdo began playing football with Figueirense Futebol Clube, making his professional debuts with Grêmio Football Porto-Alegrense, with which he won four consecutive Rio Grande do Sul Leagues.

In the summer of 1988, he signed with S.L. Benfica of Portugal, alongside compatriot Ricardo Gomes, a central defender. Both were important elements in their debut season, as the Eagles won the Primeira Liga championship, a feat which was again accomplished in 1991, with the midfielder netting five goals in 26 matches.

Both Valdo and Gomes left for Paris Saint-Germain F.C. in the 1991 summer, and both would return four years later to the Lisbon side, having won a total of four titles, including the 1993–94 edition of the Ligue 1. In his second Benfica spell, he played in 30 league matches in each of his two seasons, winning the Taça de Portugal in 1996.

Aged 32, Valdo joined J. League Division 1 club Nagoya Grampus Eight, and returned to his country after two slow years. He would continue to play until the age of 40, representing six teams in quick succession (he ended his career after having helped Botafogo de Futebol e Regatas achieve its return to the Série A).

Valdo began working as a manager in 2009, in Brazilian amateur football. Five years later, he rejoined his former Benfica boss Artur Jorge at MC Alger from Algeria.[1][2]

International career

Valdo gained 45 caps for the Brazilian national team, during six years. Before having made his first appearance he was called to the 1986 FIFA World Cup squad, but did not play one single second.

In the 1990 edition in Italy, Valdo was already a starter, and played in the national side's four matches in the tournament, including the round-of-16 0–1 loss against Argentina.[3]

Personal life

Upon retiring from football, Valdo settled in Portugal with his Portuguese wife. The couple had one daughter, Tatiele, who died in a car accident at only 13.[4]

Statistics

[5]

Club

Club performance League Cup League Cup Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Brazil League Copa do Brasil League Cup Total
1984 Grêmio Série A 5 0 5 0
1985 19 4 19 4
1986 27 6 27 6
1987 15 2 15 2
1988 30 6 30 6
Portugal League Taça de Portugal Taça da Liga Total
1988/89 Benfica Primeira Liga 28 3 28 3
1989/90 24 3 24 3
1990/91 26 5 26 5
France League Coupe de France Coupe de la Ligue Total
1991/92 Paris Saint-Germain Ligue 1 32 3 32 3
1992/93 28 3 28 3
1993/94 30 1 30 1
1994/95 25 3 3 2 28 5
Portugal League Taça de Portugal Taça da Liga Total
1995/96 Benfica Primeira Liga 30 4 30 4
1996/97 30 4 30 4
Japan League Emperor's Cup J. League Cup Total
1997 Nagoya Grampus J. League 1 16 2 1 0 4 0 21 2
1998 10 2 0 0 4 1 14 3
Brazil League Copa do Brasil League Cup Total
1998 Cruzeiro Série A 30 6 30 6
1999 16 1 16 1
2000 Santos Série A 19 1 19 1
2001 Atlético Mineiro Série A 23 1 23 1
2002 Juventude Série A 12 2 12 2
2003 São Caetano Série A 0 0 0 0
2004 Botafogo Série A 44 2 44 2
Country Brazil 240 31 240 31
Portugal 138 19 138 19
France 115 10 3 2 118 12
Japan 26 4 1 0 8 1 35 5
Total 519 64 1 0 8 1 531 67

International

Brazil
Year Apps Goals
1987 11 4
1988 6 0
1989 17 0
1990 7 0
1991 0 0
1992 2 0
1993 2 0
Total 45 4

Honours

Club

Grêmio
Benfica
Paris SG
Cruzeiro

Country

Brazil

Individual

References

  1. "MC Alger: Hachoud plaide pour la reconduction d'Artur Jorge et Valdo à la barre technique" (in French). Tribune des Lecteurs. 2015. Retrieved 7 December 2015. Unknown parameter |trans_title= ignored (help) <templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "MCA: Valdo partira demain" (in French). Compétition. 12 October 2015. Retrieved 7 December 2015. Unknown parameter |trans_title= ignored (help) <templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. ValdoFIFA competition record
  4. Rogério Micheletti (2 February 2009). "Valdo" (in Portuguese). Terceiro Tempo. Retrieved 7 December 2015. <templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. "Valdo". Footballdatabase. Retrieved 7 December 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. 6.0 6.1 Lua error in Module:Citation/CS1/Identifiers at line 47: attempt to index field 'wikibase' (a nil value).
  7. "Champions' Cup 1989–90". RSSSF. Retrieved 7 December 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. Tabeira, Martín (2 May 2013). "Copa América 1989". RSSSF. Retrieved 6 July 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links