Valerie Zimring

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Valerie Zimring
— Gymnast  —
Full name Valerie Le Zimring-Schneiderman
Country represented  United States
Born (1965-03-28) March 28, 1965 (age 56)
Los Angeles, California
Height 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in)
Discipline Rhythmic gymnastics
Years on national team 1979–85

Valerie Le Zimring-Schneiderman (born March 28, 1965 in Los Angeles) is a former Olympic rhythmic gymnast. She represented the United States at the 1984 Summer Olympics, and finished 11th in the individual all-around.

Early life

Zimring was born in Los Angeles, and lived in Cheviot Hills, Los Angeles.[1] She attended UCLA for college and graduate school, earning a B.A as well as an M.A. in program-dance.[2][3]

Career

At 11 years of age, Zimring learned she had a stress fracture in her back.[3] Having just reached the Class I level in artistic gymnastics, she had to leave it to pursue rhythmic gymnastics, which she was still able to do.[3]

Zimring was a member of the United States National Team for seven years (1979–85) and the USA World Championship team from 1981–83. In 1982, she won the All-Around title at the U.S. Junior National Championship. She also won at the Austrian Invitational in 1983, becoming the first American to win an international Rhythmic Gymnastics competition.[4]

She competed at the 1981 World Championships and the 1983 World Championships, finishing 44th and 48th in the all-around respectively.[5][6] She was the 1984 National All-around Champion, qualifying to compete in the Olympics.[4][7]

She represented the United States at the 1984 Summer Olympics, and finished 11th in the individual all-around. It was the best finish to date by an American in that event.[4][8]

Zimring is Jewish, and won five gold medals at the 1985 Maccabiah Games in Israel.[4][9]

Zimring coached the USA National Team in 1987–88.[4]

Halls of Fame

She was inducted into the Southern California Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 1990.[10] She was inducted into the USA Gymnastics Hall of Fame in 2007.[11]

See also

References

  1. "U.S. on Move in Rhythmic Gymnastics". latimes.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "UCLA's All-Time Olympians". uclabruins.com.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 "Biography: ZIMRING-SCHNEIDERMAN, Valerie". usghof.org.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 "Southern California Jewish Sports Hall of Fame Home". scjewishsportshof.com.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. Kochann, Alexander (March 18, 1999). "1981 World Championships Individual All-Around". Rhythmic Gymnastics. Retrieved April 6, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. Kochann, Alexander (March 18, 1999). "1983 World Championships Individual All-Around". Rhythmic Gymnastics. Retrieved April 6, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. "Valerie Zimring-Schneiderman". USA Gymnastics Hall of Fame. USA Gymnastics. Retrieved April 6, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. "Valerie Zimring". sports-reference. Retrieved April 6, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. Abel, Robert (July 10, 2013). "Maccabiah coach continues gymnastics tradition". Jewish Journal. Retrieved April 6, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. "Valerie Zimring". Southern California Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved April 6, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  11. "Class of 2007". USA Gymnastics Hall of Fame. USA Gymnastics. Retrieved April 6, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>