William House (trade unionist)

From Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core
Jump to: navigation, search

William House (died 1917) was a British trade unionist.

House grew up in the West Auckland area of County Durham. He worked for many years as a coal miner,[1] and joined the Independent Labour Party.[2] He was elected to Durham County Council, then as a checkweighman for his pit. He was particularly prominent in the 1892 miners' strike, and became known for his public speaking.[1] In 1899, he was chosen as an agent for the Durham Miners' Association,[3] and he was elected as the union's President the following year, serving until his death.[4]

House stood for the Labour Party in Bishop Auckland at the January and December 1910 UK general elections, coming within 5% of victory on the second occasion.[5] He also stood unsuccessfully in the Houghton-le-Spring by-election, 1913.[6] The following year, he became Vice-President of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain. He was the union's choice to replace John Wilson in the Mid Durham by-election, 1915, but they ultimately chose not to stand him, due to the electoral truce during the First World War.[7]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 T. Readshaw, History of the Bishop Auckland Industrial Co-operative Flour and Provision Society Ltd, p.204
  2. Duncan Tanner, Political Change and the Labour Party 1900-1918, pp.281-282
  3. John Wilson, A History of the Durham miners, p.293
  4. W. R. Garside, The Durham Miners: 1919-1960, pp.78-79
  5. Duncan Tanner, Political Change and the Labour Party 1900-1918, p.219
  6. Duncan Tanner, Political Change and the Labour Party 1900-1918, p.205
  7. W. R. Garside, The Durham Miners: 1919-1960, pp.322-323
Trade union offices
Preceded by
John Forman
President of the Durham Miners' Association
1900–1917
Succeeded by
James Robson
Preceded by
W. E. Harvey
Vice-President of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain
1914–1917
Succeeded by
Herbert Smith