Philosophy of dialogue

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Philosophy of dialogue is a type of philosophy based on the work of the Austrian-born Jewish philosopher Martin Buber best known through its classic presentation in his 1923 book I and Thou.[1] For Buber, the fundamental fact of human existence, too readily overlooked by scientific rationalism and abstract philosophical thought, is "man with man", a dialogue which takes place in the "sphere of between" ("das Zwischenmenschliche").[2]

See also

References

  1. Max Rosenbaum, Milton Miles Berger (1975). Group psychotherapy and group function, p. 719.
  2. Maurice S. Friedman (1955) Martin Buber. The Life of Dialogue, p. 85. University of Chicago Press.

Further reading

  • Rob Anderson, Leslie A. Baxter, Kenneth N. Cissna (Eds.). (2004). Dialogue: theorizing difference in communication studies.
  • Peter Atterton, Matthew Calarco, Maurice S. Friedman (2004). Lévinas & Buber: dialogue & difference
  • Samuel Hugo Bergman (1991). Dialogical philosophy from Kierkegaard to Buber.
  • Kenneth N. Cissna & Rob Anderson (2002). Moments of meeting: Buber, Rogers, and the potential for public dialogue.
  • Hans Köchler (2009). The Philosophy and Politics of Dialogue.
  • Tim L. Kellebrew (2012). Brief Overview of Dialogical Psychotherapy
  • Tim L. Kellebrew (2013). On the World as Misrepresentation

External links