List of college football games played outside the United States

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Notre Dame and Navy captains take part in the 2012 Emerald Isle Classic in Dublin.

In the United States, college football has been played since the 1869 season when Princeton and Rutgers played the first game. In the early years of the game, Harvard University and McGill University developed a rivalry that is credited with the establishment of modern American football.[1][2][3] The first game played outside the United States occurred on October 23, 1874, when the Crimson defeated McGill 3–0 at Montreal.[1][3] Several other games were played during the early years of the game in Canada until the differences between American and Canadian football became significant enough that Canadian and American universities ceased playing one-another.[3] In addition to the early Canadian games, several teams competed in the Bacardi Bowl at Havana, Cuba until it was discontinued after the 1946 edition of the game.[4]

Although not common, National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) rules allow for member institutions to compete in regular season games scheduled in foreign countries no more than once every four years.[5] The first of these games occurred in 1976 when Grambling State defeated Morgan State in the Pioneer Bowl at Korakuen Stadium in Tokyo.[6] After that initial game, a regular season game called the Mirage Bowl (later called the Coca-Cola Classic) was played in Tokyo from 1977 to 1993.[7] Since 1977, regular season games have also been played in Australia, Bermuda, Germany, Ireland, Italy and the United Kingdom.[7]

In April 2006, the NCAA announced Toronto was awarded a postseason bowl game to be played at Rogers Centre.[8] The International Bowl was the first bowl game played outside the United States since the Bacardi Bowl in 1937.[4] However the game was discontinued after its 2010 edition.[9] Two international games are scheduled to be played as part of the 2014 NCAA Division I FBS football season. Penn State and UCF played their season opener in the Croke Park Classic at Dublin, and the Bahamas Bowl had its inaugural edition at Thomas Robinson Stadium in Nassau in December 2014 and its second edition on December 24, 2015.[10][11]

In addition to those played, several international games have been proposed from time-to-time that were never actually played. In 1989, USC and Illinois were scheduled to open their season in the Glasnost Bowl at Dynamo Stadium in Moscow.[12] However, the game was canceled and moved to the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum due to the logistics of undertaking a college football game in the Soviet Union.[12] In 1996, the Haka Bowl was scheduled for play at Auckland, New Zealand, but its certification was subsequently revoked by the NCAA due to financing concerns.[13] In 2013, bowl games were proposed for both Dublin, Ireland and Dubai, United Arab Emirates, but neither was certified by the NCAA for play.[14]

Games

Sports and games.png This sports-related list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.
List of games showing date, season, score, opponents, stadium, city, country, attendance and other notes[A 1]
Date Season[A 2] Score Winning team[A 3] Losing team[A 3] Stadium City Country Attendance[17] Notes/References
October 23, 1874 1874 3–0 Harvard McGill Montreal Cricket Grounds Montreal Canada 2,000 [18]
October 23, 1875 1875 1–0 Harvard Montreal FBC Montreal Cricket Grounds Montreal Canada [19]
October 30, 1876 1876 1–0 Harvard McGill Montreal Cricket Grounds Montreal Canada [18]
October 26, 1877 1877 1–0 Harvard McGill Montreal Cricket Grounds Montreal Canada [18]
November 1, 1879 1879 1–0 Harvard Britannias FBC Montreal Canada [20]
November 3, 1879 1879 0–0 Harvard McGill Montreal Cricket Grounds Montreal Canada [18]
November 1, 1880 1880 2–1 Harvard Ottawa FBC Ottawa Canada [21]
November 2, 1880 1880 0–0 Harvard Montreal FBC Montreal Cricket Grounds Montreal Canada [19]
November 6, 1880 1880 13–6 Michigan Toronto Toronto Lacrosse Club Toronto Canada [22]
October 29, 1881 1881 0–0 Harvard Britannias FBC Montreal Canada [20]
November 7, 1885 1885 8–2 Michigan Windsor Windsor Canada Was played under Canadian rules[23]
December 25, 1907 1907 56–0 LSU Havana Almandares Park Havana Cuba 10,000 Was played as the Bacardi Bowl[7]
January 1, 1910 1909 11–0 Cuban Athletic Club Tulane Almandares Park Havana Cuba Was played as the Bacardi Bowl
January 1, 1912 1911 12–0 Mississippi A&M Cuban Athletic Club Almandares Park Havana Cuba Was played as the Bacardi Bowl
October 28, 1912 1912 49–1 Carlisle Toronto Toronto Canada Was played as exhibition with the first half played under American and the second half under Canadian rules[24]
November 2, 1912 1912 12–0 Assumption Michigan State Normal Windsor Canada [25]
December 25, 1912 1912 28–0 Florida Vedado Tennis Club Almandares Park Havana Cuba Was played as the Bacardi Bowl
October 9, 1915 1915 33–0 Michigan State Normal Assumption Windsor Canada [25]
October 17, 1917 1917 28–0 Michigan State Normal Assumption Windsor Canada [25]
October 9, 1920 1920 27–13 Michigan State Normal Assumption Windsor Canada [25]
November 5, 1921 1921 13–0 Syracuse McGill Percival Molson Memorial Stadium Montreal Canada [26]
December 31, 1921 1921 14–0 Cuban Athletic Club Ole Miss Almandares Park Havana Cuba Was played as the Bacardi Bowl
October 7, 1922 1922 13–0 Michigan State Normal Assumption Windsor Canada [25]
October 15, 1927 1927 26–7 Michigan State Normal Assumption Windsor Canada [25]
January 1, 1937 1936 7–7 Auburn Villanova La Tropical Stadium Havana Cuba Was played as the Bacardi Bowl[27]
October 28, 1944 1944 7–6 Idaho State Edmonton AAB Clarke Stadium Edmonton Canada 5,500 Was played as exhibition against a squad of U.S. military servicemen called the Alaska Clippers[28][29]
November 25, 1944 1944 7–6 Idaho State Edmonton AAB Clarke Stadium Edmonton Canada Was played as exhibition against a squad of U.S. military servicemen called the Alaska Clippers[29]
November 6, 1946 1946 12–0 Nevada Edmonton AAB Clarke Stadium Edmonton Canada 1,500 Was played as exhibition against a squad of U.S. military servicemen called the Alaska Clippers[30]
December 7, 1946 1946 55–0 Mississippi Southern Havana La Tropical Stadium Havana Cuba Was played as the Bacardi Bowl
October 1, 1954 1954 19–6 Eastern New Mexico Notre Dame (Canada) Taylor Field Regina Canada 4,000 Was the first night game played at Taylor Field and was played under American rules[31]
June 1, 1976 1976 17–8 Texas A&I Henderson State West Berlin Germany 9,000 Was the first college football game in Europe[32][33]
June 5, 1976 1976 21–7 Texas A&I Henderson State Prater Stadium Vienna Austria 18,000 [34]
June 12, 1976 1976 20–6 Texas A&I Henderson State Mannheim Germany [35]
June 1976 1976 17–5 Texas A&I Henderson State Nuremberg Germany [36]
June 1976 1976 21–13 Texas A&I Henderson State Stade Colombes Paris France 25,000 [37]
September 24, 1976 1976 42–16 Grambling State Morgan State Korakuen Stadium Tokyo Japan 50,000 Was played as the Pioneer Bowl, and was first college game played outside the western hemisphere[38]
December 11, 1977 1977 35–32 Grambling State Temple Korakuen Stadium Tokyo Japan 50,000 Was played as the Mirage Bowl[7][39]
September 3, 1978 1978 10–0 Utah State Idaho State Hankyu Nishinomiya Stadium Nishinomiya Japan 15,000 Was the first college football season-opener played in Japan[7][40]
December 2, 1978 1978 28–24 BYU UNLV Yokohama Stadium Yokohama Japan 27,500 Was played as the Yokohama Bowl[7][41][42]
December 10, 1978 1978 28–24 Temple Boston College Korakuen Stadium Tokyo Japan 55,000 Was played as the Mirage Bowl[7]
November 24, 1979 1979 40–15 Notre Dame Miami (FL) Korakuen Stadium Tokyo Japan 62,574 Was played as the Mirage Bowl[7]
November 30, 1980 1980 34–3 UCLA Oregon State National Olympic Stadium Tokyo Japan 86,000 Was played as the Mirage Bowl[7][43]
November 28, 1981 1981 21–16 Air Force San Diego State National Olympic Stadium Tokyo Japan 80,000 Was played as the Mirage Bowl[7]
November 27, 1982 1982 21–17 Clemson Wake Forest National Olympic Stadium Tokyo Japan 64,700 Was played as the Mirage Bowl[7][44]
November 26, 1983 1983 34–12 SMU Houston National Olympic Stadium Tokyo Japan 70,000 Was played as the Mirage Bowl[7][45]
November 17, 1984 1984 45–31 Army Montana National Olympic Stadium Tokyo Japan 60,000 Was played as the Mirage Bowl[7][46]
November 30, 1985 1985 20–6 USC Oregon National Olympic Stadium Tokyo Japan 65,000 Was played as the Mirage Bowl[7][47]
December 6, 1985 1985 24–21 Wyoming UTEP VFL Park Melbourne Australia 19,107 Was played as the Australia Bowl[7][48]
November 30, 1986 1986 29–24 Stanford Arizona National Olympic Stadium Tokyo Japan 55,000 Was played as the Coca-Cola Classic[7][49]
November 28, 1987 1987 17–17 California Washington State National Olympic Stadium Tokyo Japan 45,000 Was played as the Coca-Cola Classic[7][50]
December 4, 1987 1987 30–26 BYU Colorado State Princes Park Melbourne Australia 7,652 Was played as the Melbourne Bowl[51]
October 16, 1988 1988 20–17 Richmond Boston University Crystal Palace National Sports Centre London United Kingdom 2,500 [7][52]
November 19, 1988 1988 38–24 Boston College Army Lansdowne Road Dublin Ireland 42,525 Was played as the Emerald Isle Classic and was also the first major college football game played in Europe[7][53]
December 3, 1988 1988 45–42 Oklahoma State Texas Tech Tokyo Dome Tokyo Japan 56,000 Was played as the Coca-Cola Classic[7][54]
October 28, 1989 1996 28–25 Villanova Rhode Island Arena Civica Milan Italy 5,000 Was played as the Milano Kickoff Classic and was the first college football game played in Italy[55][56]
December 2, 1989 1989 46–29 Pittsburgh Rutgers Lansdowne Road Dublin Ireland 19,800 Was played as the Emerald Isle Classic[7][57]
December 4, 1989 1989 24–13 Syracuse Louisville Tokyo Dome Tokyo Japan 50,000 Was played as the Coca-Cola Classic[7]
December 2, 1990 1990 62–45 Houston Arizona State Tokyo Dome Tokyo Japan 50,000 Was played as the Coca-Cola Classic[7]
November 16, 1991 1991 24–19 Holy Cross Fordham Gaelic Grounds Limerick Ireland 17,411 Was played as the Wild Geese Classic and was the first non-Gaelic game played at Limerick[7][58]
November 30, 1991 1991 33–21 Clemson Duke Tokyo Dome Tokyo Japan 50,000 Was played as the Coca-Cola Classic[7]
September 19, 1992 1992 7–7 Heidelberg Otterbein Stadion am Bieberer Berg Offenbach am Main Germany 4,351 Was played as the Rhine River Classic and was the college football game played in Germany[7][59][60]
November 29, 1992 1992 7–6 Bowdoin Tufts Pearse Stadium Galway Ireland 2,500 Was played as the Christopher Columbus Classic[7][61]
December 6, 1992 1992 38–24 Nebraska Kansas State Tokyo Dome Tokyo Japan 50,000 Was played as the Coca-Cola Classic[7]
November 20, 1993 1993 17–14 Georgetown Washington and Lee Bermuda National Stadium Hamilton Bermuda 3,218 Was played as the Bermuda Bowl[7][62]
December 5, 1993 1993 41–20 Wisconsin Michigan State Tokyo Dome Tokyo Japan 51,500 Was played as the Coca-Cola Classic[7]
November 19, 1994 1994 28–14 Davidson Sewanee Bermuda National Stadium Hamilton Bermuda 2,000 Was played as the Bermuda Bowl[7][63]
October 28, 1995 1995 17–10 Fordham Holy Cross Bermuda National Stadium Hamilton Bermuda 2,436 Was played as the Bermuda Bowl[7]
November 2, 1996 1996 54–27 Notre Dame Navy Croke Park Dublin Ireland 38,651 Was played as the Shamrock Classic[7][64]
January 6, 2007 2006 27–24 Cincinnati Western Michigan Rogers Centre Toronto Canada 26,717 Was played as the 2007 International Bowl[65]
January 5, 2008 2007 52–30 Rutgers Ball State Rogers Centre Toronto Canada 31,455 Was played as the 2008 International Bowl[65]
January 3, 2009 2008 38–20 Connecticut Buffalo Rogers Centre Toronto Canada 40,184 Was played as the 2009 International Bowl[65]
January 2, 2010 2009 27–3 South Florida Northern Illinois Rogers Centre Toronto Canada 22,185 Was played as the 2010 International Bowl[65]
May 21, 2011 2010 17–7 Drake CONADEIP Stars Sheikh Amri Abeid Memorial Stadium Arusha Tanzania 11,781 Was played as the 2011 Kilimanjaro Bowl and was the first time an American football team played in Africa[66]
August 31, 2012 2012 40–3 John Carroll St. Norbert Donnybrook Stadium Dublin Ireland [67]
September 1, 2012 2012 50–10 Notre Dame Navy Aviva Stadium Dublin Ireland 48,820 Was played as the Emerald Isle Classic.[68]
August 30, 2014 2014 26–24 Penn State UCF Croke Park Dublin Ireland 55,000 Was played as the Croke Park Classic.[69]
December 24, 2014 2014 49–48 Western Kentucky Central Michigan Thomas Robinson Stadium Nassau Bahamas 13,667 Was played as the 2014 Bahamas Bowl[70]
March 21, 2015 2015 36–7 Princeton Kwansei Gakuin KINCHO Stadium Osaka Japan N/A Was played as the Legacy Bowl, a memorial exhibition game celebrating the 125th anniversary of Kwansei Gakuin University's founding.[71]
December 24, 2015 2015 45–31 Western Michigan Middle Tennessee Thomas Robinson Stadium Nassau Bahamas 13,123 Was played as the 2015 Bahamas Bowl[72]
August 27, 2016 2016 California Hawaiʻi ANZ Stadium Sydney Australia To be played as the Sydney College Football Cup.[73]
September 3, 2016 2016 Boston College Georgia Tech Aviva Stadium Dublin Ireland To be played as the Aer Lingus College Football Classic.[74]

Notes

  1. This listing does not include games played at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, Canada. The Clan competed as NAIA members from 1965 to 2001 and also in 2010,[15] and since 2011 have competed as the lone international member of the NCAA.[16]
  2. Links to the overall college football season article.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Links to the season article for the opponent when available or to their general page when unavailable.

References

General
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). "Bowl/All-Star Game Records" (PDF). 2011 NCAA Division I Football Records. NCAA.org. Retrieved August 30, 2011. 
Specific
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  40. "Aggies off to 1–0 start". Deseret News. Google News Archives. September 4, 1978. p. 2B. Retrieved October 24, 2013. 
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