United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, 2016

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United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, 2016
Texas
← 2014 November 8, 2016 (2016-11-08) 2018 →

All 36 Texas seats to the United States House of Representatives
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 25 11

2016 Texas US House.svg


The 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas will be held on November 8, 2016, to elect the 36 U.S. Representatives from the State of Texas, one from each of the state's 36 congressional districts. The elections will coincide with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The primaries were held on March 1.

District 1

The incumbent is Republican Louie Gohmert, who has represented the district since 2004. He was re-elected with 77% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+24. He faced a primary challenge from two competitors: Simon Winston, and Anthony Culler. Democrat Shirley McKellar, who lost to Gohmert in 2012 and 2014, will run for the district's seat again.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Louie Gohmert 95,710 81.98
Republican Simon Winston 16,212 13.88
Republican Anthony Culler 4,818 4.12
Total votes 116,740 100

District 3

The incumbent is Republican Sam Johnson, who has represented the district since 1991. He was re-elected with 82% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+17.

State Representative Scott Turner is a potential Republican candidate whenever Johnson retires.[2]

Democrats Adam Bell and Michael Filak ran in the Democratic primary. Bell won the nomination to oppose Johnson in the November 8 general election.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sam Johnson 65,288 74.61
Republican John Calvin Slavens 10,022 11.45
Republican Keith L. Thurgood 7,157 8.17
Republican David Cornette 5,032 5.75
Total votes 87,499 100
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Adam Bell 14,223 60.35
Democratic Michael Filak 9,342 39.64
Total votes 23,565 100

District 4

The incumbent, Republican John Ratcliffe, represented the district since 2014. He was challenged in the Republican primary by Lou Gigliotti, and Ray Hall. Ratcliffe won the primary runoff with 66.59% of the vote.[4] No Democrat filed to run.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Ratcliffe 76,973 66.59
Republican Lou Gigliotti 26,314 22.76
Republican Ray Hall 12,303 10.64
Total votes 115,590 100

District 6

The incumbent is Republican Joe Barton, who has represented the district since 1985. He was re-elected in 2014 with 61% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+11. His reelection margin increased to 68.7 percent in the 2016 primary.

Software engineer David Cozad, who was the Democratic nominee in 2010 and 2014, is running again.[5] Democrats Ruby Faye Woolridge, Jeffrey Roseman, and Don Jaquess ran in the Democratic primary which Ruby Faye Woolridge won with 68.65%.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joe Barton 55,197 68.65
Republican Steven Fowler 17,927 22.29
Republican Collin Baker 7,279 9.05
Total votes 80,403 100
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ruby Faye Woolridge 22,954 69.68
Democratic Jeffrey Roseman 5,917 17.96
Democratic Don Jaquess 4,069 12.35
Total votes 32,940 100

District 7

The incumbent, Republican John Culberson, represented the district since 2001. Culberson won the primary with 57% of the vote where he faced James Lloyd and Maria Espinoza. Energy attorney and nominee for the seat in 2012 and 2014, James Cargas will challenge Culberson in the general election.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Culberson 44,202 57.28
Republican James Lloyd 19,182 24.86
Republican Maria Espinoza 13,772 17.84
Total votes 77,156 100

District 8

The incumbent, Republican Kevin Brady, represented the district since 1997. Brady was challenged again in the primary by Craig McMichael along with former State Representative Steve Toth and Andre Dean; Brady won with 53.4 percent of the vote and is unopposed in the November 8 general election.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kevin Brady 64,745 53.39
Republican Steve Toth (former state representative) 45,298 37.35
Republican Craig McMichael 6,021 4.96
Republican Andre Dean 5,196 4.28
Total votes 121,260 100

District 10

The incumbent, Republican Michael McCaul, has represented the district since 2005. Democrat Tawana Walter-Cadien, who was the democrat nominee in 2014, and Scot Gallaher ran in the Democratic primary. Tawana Walter-Cadien won the Democratic nomination with 51.7 percent of the vote.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tawana Walter-Cadien 21,997 51.65
Democratic Scot Gallaher 20,586 48.34
Total votes 42,583 100

District 14

The incumbent, Republican Randy Weber, represented the district since 2013. Keith Casey ran in the Republican primary; Weber won with 84.03% of the vote. Michael Cole is Democratic nominee.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Weber 57,769 84.03
Republican Keith Casey 10,971 15.96
Total votes 68,740 100

District 15

The incumbent is Democrat Rubén Hinojosa, who has represented the district since 1997. He was re-elected in 2014 with 54% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+5. Hinojosa is retiring.[6]

Six Democrats are running for the seat: law student Ruben Ramirez, former Hildago County Democratic Party Chairwoman Dolly Elizondo, attorney Vicente Gonzalez, Edinburg School Board Member Juan "Sonny" Palacios Jr., former Hidalgo County Commissioner Joel Quintanilla, and accountant Randy Sweeten.[6] No candidate received 50% of the vote so the top two candidates, Vincente Gonzalez and Juan "Sonny" Palacios, Jr. will face a Runoff Election.

Former Rio Grande City Mayor Ruben Villarreal, Pastor Tim Westley, and Edinburg School Board Member Xavier Salinas are running for the Republican Party nomination.[6] No candidate received 50% of the vote so the top two candidates, Tim Westley and Ruben Villarreal will face a Runoff Election.

On May 24, 2016, Vicente Gonzalez defeated Juan "Sonny" Palacios, for the Democratic nomination, Tim Westley defeated Ruben Villarreal, for the Republican Nomination. They now go on to face Vanessa Tijerina, (nurse, political activist, biologist) the Green Party nominee and the male Libertarian nominee.

If Vanessa Tijerina is elected, she will be the first Latina from Texas, in history, voted into U.S. Congress, she will also be the first Green Party member in U.S. Congressional history.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Westley 13,153 45.33
Republican Ruben Villarreal 9,131 31.47
Republican Xavier Salinas 6,730 23.19
Total votes 29,014 100
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Vincente Gonzalez 22,122 42.20
Democratic Juan "Sonny" Palacios, Jr. 9,907 18.89
Democratic Dolly Elizondo 8,881 16.94
Democratic Joel Quintanilla 6,144 11.72
Democratic Ruben Ramirez 3,146 6.00
Democratic Rance G "Randy" Sweeten 2,218 4.23
Total votes 52,418 100

District 16

The incumbent, Democrat Beto O'Rourke, has represented the district since 2013. With 85.6 percent of the vote, he defeated Ben Mendoza in the primary election.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Beto O'Rourke 39,958 85.58
Democratic Ben Mendoza 6,732 14.41
Total votes 46,690 100

District 17

The incumbent, Republican Bill Flores, represented the district since 2011. Flores won the primary with 72.45% of the vote against Ralph Patterson and Kaleb Sims.[1] Democrat William Matta will run in the election.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Flores 60,434 72.45
Republican Ralph Patterson 15,387 18.44
Republican Kaleb Sims 7,591 9.10
Total votes 83,412 100

District 18

The incumbent, Democrat Sheila Jackson Lee, represented the district since 1995. Republicans Lori Bartley, Reggie Gonzales, Sharon Joy Fisher and Ava Pate ran in the primary election. No candidate achieved 50% of the vote, so Lori Bartley and Reggie Gonzales will face each other in the Runoff.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lori Bartley 5,679 33.67
Republican Reggie Gonzales 5,578 33.07
Republican Sharon Joy Fisher 4,405 26.12
Republican Ava Pate 1,202 7.12
Total votes 16,864 100

District 19

The incumbent is Republican Randy Neugebauer, who has represented the district since 2003. He was re-elected in 2014 with 77 percent of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+26.

Lubbock Mayor Glen Robertson announced in January 2015 that he was considering running against Neugebauer in the 2016 Republican primary. He cited unhappiness with what he said was Neugebauer's failure to bolster the cotton industry.[7] In March, Robertson said that he would not run for Congress and instead run once more for mayor.[8]

After Neugebauer decided to retire, Robertson entered the congressional race and withdrew from consideration for another term as mayor. None of the nine candidates obtained a majority in the Republican primary on March 1. Robertson led the field and now meets in a runoff election on May 24 Jodey Arrington, a former official in the George W. Bush administration and a former vice chancellor at Texas Tech University in Lubbock. Arrington had trailed Robertson by fewer than one thousand votes.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Glen Robertson 26,860 27.38
Republican Jodey Arrington 25,942 26.44
Republican Michael Bob Starr (former commander of Dyess Air Force Base) 19,879 20.26
Republican Donald R. May (Lubbock surgeon) 8,813 8.98
Republican Greg Garrett (banker) 7,974 8.13
Republican Jason Corley (farmer) 2,445 2.49
Republican DeRenda Warren (nursing supervisor) 2,241 2.28
Republican Don Parrish (farmer) 2,072 2.11
Republican John C. Key (veterinarian) 1,854 1.89
Total votes 98,080 100

District 21

The incumbent is Republican Lamar S. Smith, who has represented the district since 1987. The district has a PVI of R+11.

Lamar S. Smith is running for re-election and will face Matt McCall, John Murphy and Todd Phelps in the Republican primary. Thomas Wakely and Tejas Vakil are running for the Democratic nomination. Wakely won the Democratic nomination with 58.99% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar S. Smith 69,872 60.10
Republican Matt McCall 33,597 28.90
Republican Todd Phelps 6,591 5.66
Republican John Murphy 6,189 5.32
Total votes 116,249 100
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tom Wakely 29,592 58.99
Democratic Tejas Vakil 20,566 41.00
Total votes 50,158 100

District 22

The incumbent, Republican Pete Olson, represented the district since 2009. Democrats Mark Gibson, who lost in his party's primary in 2014, and A. R. Hassan ran for their party's nomination; Gibson won with this time with 76.11% of the vote.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mark Gibson 22,770 76.11
Democratic A. R. Hassan 7,146 23.88
Total votes 29,916 100

District 23

The incumbent Republican, Will Hurd of Helotes near San Antonio, has represented the district since 2015. He was elected in 2014, when he narrowly unseated the then Democratic incumbent Pete Gallego of Alpine. The district has a PVI of R+3.

Gallego faces Hurd in a rematch in the November 8 general election.[9]

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Will Hurd 39,762 82.23
Republican William "Hart" Peterson 8,590 17.76
Total votes 48,352 100
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pete Gallego 43,196 88.36
Democratic Lee Keenen 5,687 11.63
Total votes 48,883 100

District 26

The incumbent, Republican Michael C. Burgess, represented the district since 2003. He was challenged in the Republican primary by Joel A. Krause and Micah Beebe; Burgess won with 79.35% of the vote. Eric Mauck is the Democratic nominee.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael C. Burgess 73,515 79.35
Republican Joel A. Krause 13,183 14.23
Republican Micah Beebe 5,938 6.41
Total votes 92,636 100

District 27

The incumbent is Republican Blake Farenthold, who has represented the district since 2011. He was re-elected in 2014 with 64% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+13.

John Harrington, president and founder of firearms retailer Shield Tactical, announced a primary challenge of Farenthold in May 2015.[10] The Texas Tribune reported that Harrington had the capacity to self-fund a race.[11] In August 2015 he announced that he was withdrawing because of lingering effects of a motorcycle crash.[12]

Former State Representative Solomon Ortiz, Jr., considered running for the Democratic nomination[13] Corpus Christi Mayor Nelda Martinez has announced that she will not run.[13] but failed to do so.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Blake Farenthold 42,872 55.98
Republican Gregg Deeb 33,699 44.01
Total votes 76,571 100
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Raul (Roy) Barrera 16,146 50.26
Democratic Ray Madrigal 11,294 35.16
Democratic Wayne Raasch 4,679 14.57
Total votes 32,113 100

District 28

The incumbent, Democrat Henry Cuellar, has represented the district since 2005. Cuellar was challenged by Republican-turned-Democrat William R. Hayward in the primary, in which Cuellar prevailed with 89.8 percent of the vote. Zeffen Hardin of San Antonio is the Republican nominee in the November 8 general election.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Henry Cuellar 49,962 89.78
Democratic William R. Hayward 5,682 10.21
Total votes 55,644 100

District 29

The incumbent, Democrat Gene Green, represented the district since 1993. Green was challenged by Adrian Garcia and Dominique Garcia, but won the primary with 58% of the vote.

Julio Garza, and Robert Schafranek ran in the Republican primary, which Garza won with 59 percent of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Julio Garza 7,409 59.15
Republican Robert Schafranek 5,116 40.84
Total votes 12,525 100
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gene Green 14,882 58.25
Democratic Adrian Garcia 9,671 37.85
Democratic Dominique Garcia 993 3.88
Total votes 25,546 100

District 30

The incumbent, Democrat Eddie Bernice Johnson, represented the district since 1993. State Representative Barbara Mallory Caraway, who was a candidate for the seat in 2012 and 2014, challenged Johnson in the Democratic primary for a third time; Brandon J. Vance also ran in the primary. Johnson won with 69.42 percent of the vote. Republican Charles Lingerfelt is the Republican nominee.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eddie Bernice Johnson 44,505 69.42
Democratic Barbara Mallory Caraway 15,266 23.81
Democratic Brandon J. Vance 4,336 6.76
Total votes 64,107 100

District 31

The incumbent, Republican John Carter, has represented the district since 2003. He was challenged in the Republican primary by Mike Sweeney but won the primary with 71.28 percent of the vote.

Democrat Mike Clark is the Democratic nominee.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Carter 62,718 71.28
Republican Mike Sweeney 25,270 28.71
Total votes 87,988 100

District 32

The incumbent, Republican Pete Sessions, represented the district since 2003, and previously represented the 5th district from 1997 to 2003. Russ Ramsland and Paul Brown challenged Sessions for the Republican nomination; Sessions won with 61 percent of the vote. No Democratic filed to run.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Sessions 49,632 61.43
Republican Russ Ramsland 19,105 23.64
Republican Paul Brown 9,462 11.71
Republican Cherie Myint Roughneen 2,584 3.19
Total votes 80,783 100

District 33

The incumbent, Democrat Marc Veasey, represented the district since 2013. Marc Veasey was challenged in the democratic primary by Carlos Quintanilla and won with 63 percent of the vote.

M. Mark Mitchell and Bruce Chadwick ran in the Republican primary, which Mitchell won with 52.39 percent of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican M. Mark Mitchell 6,410 52.39
Republican Bruce Chadwick 5,824 47.60
Total votes 12,234 100
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marc Veasey 20,494 63.38
Democratic Carlos Quintanilla 11,837 36.61
Total votes 32,331 100

District 34

The incumbent, Democrat Filemon Vela, Jr., represented the district since 2013. Republicans Rey Gonzalez, Jr. and William "Willie" Vaden ran in the Republican primary, which Gonzalez won with 50.56 percent of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rey Gonzalez, Jr. 12,530 50.56
Republican William "Willie" Vaden 12,252 49.43
Total votes 24,782 100

District 36

The incumbent is Republican Brian Babin, who has represented the district since 2015, when Steve Stockman vacated the seat after a failed campaign for the United States Senate. He was elected with 76 percent of the vote in 2014. The district has a PVI of R+25.

Babin is running for re-election to a second term.[14] Dwayne Stovall, a bridge construction contractor, school board member from Cleveland, and an unsuccessful candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2014 and the Texas House of Representatives in 2012, announced that he would challenge Babin for the Republican U.S. House nomination. Stovall, however, suspended his campaign in December 2015.[15][16]

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 1.19 1.20 "2016 Primary Election Unofficial Results, March 1, 2016". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved March 2, 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "San Antonio Republican Joe Straus re-elected speaker with all El Paso votes". El Paso Times. January 13, 2015. Retrieved January 15, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 "2016 Primary Election Unofficial Results, March 1, 2016". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved March 2, 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. "Ratcliffe defeats Gigliotti in race for U.S. House seat". HeraldDemocrat.com. Retrieved March 2, 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. Recio, Maria; Tinsley, Anna M. (March 7, 2015). "PoliTex: Kay Granger chooses work over recognition". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved May 29, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 http://www.texastribune.org/2016/02/16/scrambled-race-replace-hinojosa/
  7. "Lubbock mayor considering bid for 19th congressional seat". KCBD. January 26, 2015. Retrieved January 27, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. "Robertson not running for Congress; will seek another term as mayor". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. March 3, 2015. Retrieved April 17, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. Livingston, Abby (April 2, 2015). "Gallego to Seek Rematch With U.S. Rep. Hurd". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved April 3, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. Stakes, Justin (May 8, 2015). "Shield Tactical's John W. Harrington is Running for Congress". Ammoland. Retrieved October 21, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  11. Livingston, Abby (June 21, 2015). "3 Texas Congressmen Anticipating Tea Party Challengers". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved October 21, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  12. "US Congressional candidate from Shiner withdraws". The Victoria Advocate. August 12, 2015. Retrieved October 21, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  13. 13.0 13.1 Livingston, Abby (March 27, 2015). "Former Congressman's Son Mulls Challenging Farenthold". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved May 29, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  14. "Dr. Brian Babin announces re-election for Congress for Texas' 36th Congressional District". The Orange Leader. November 27, 2015. Retrieved December 4, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  15. Price, Bob (July 1, 2015). "Grassroots Leader Dwayne Stovall Announces Race for Texas Congressional Seat". Breitbart News. Retrieved July 6, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  16. Brashier, Vanessa (December 2, 2015). "Stovall dropping out of race for Congressional District 36". The Deer Park Broadcaster. Retrieved December 14, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links