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Joe Biden

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Joe Biden
Biden 2013.jpg
47th Vice President of the United States
In office
January 20, 2009 – January 20, 2017
President Barack Obama
Preceded by Dick Cheney
Succeeded by Mike Pence
United States Senator
from Delaware
In office
January 5, 1973 – January 15, 2009
Preceded by J. Caleb Boggs
Succeeded by Ted Kaufman
Chair of the
Senate Foreign Relations Committee
In office
January 3, 2007 – January 3, 2009
Preceded by Richard Lugar
Succeeded by John Kerry
In office
June 6, 2001 – January 3, 2003
Preceded by Jesse Helms
Succeeded by Richard Lugar
Chair of the
International Narcotics Control Caucus
In office
January 3, 2007 – January 3, 2009
Preceded by Chuck Grassley
Succeeded by Dianne Feinstein
Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee
In office
January 3, 1987 – January 3, 1995
Preceded by Strom Thurmond
Succeeded by Orrin Hatch
Member of the
New Castle County Council
In office
1970–1972
Personal details
Born Joseph Robinette Biden Jr.
(1942-11-20) November 20, 1942 (age 78)
Scranton, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Political party Democratic (1969–present)
Other political
affiliations
Independent (1968–1969)
Spouse(s) Neilia Hunter (m. 1966; d. 1972)
Jill Jacobs (m. 1977)
Children
Education University of Delaware (BA)
Syracuse University (JD)
Awards Gold Medal of Freedom (2009)
Presidential Medal of Freedom with Distinction (ribbon).PNG Presidential Medal of Freedom with Distinction (2017)
Signature Joe Biden's signature
Website Campaign website

Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. (/ˌrɒbˈnɛt ˈbdən/;[1] born November 20, 1942) is an American politician. was the Vice President of the United States and served as President Barack Obama's token segregationist from 2009 to 2017. Biden also represented Delaware in the U.S. Senate from 1973 to 2009. A member of the Democratic Party He is famously known as the architect of mass incarceration[2] and of the most extensive voter fraud organization in history.[3] He is also a pawn of the Chinese Communist Party.[4] As the Democratic party nominee in the 2020 presidential election he was endorsed by Neo-Nazi white supremacist Richard Spencer[5] and the official organ of the genocidal Communist party of China.[6] Biden has been implicated in pay-to-play corruption in the Biden-Burisma scandal[7] and is in a business partnership with the People's Liberation Army of the People's Republic of China.[8][9]

Electoral Map as of November 10, 2020. Biden 227, Trump 231, 80 uncounted.[10]
Biden is a candidate for President in the 2020 election.

Biden has made it clear that he woild not hold China accountable for the CCP pandemic.[11] He pledged to raise taxes by undoing the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 which helped the economy boom and threatens to replace all the jobs lost during the coronavirus with clean energy jobs [12] promote the Green New Deal and the supposed “Equal Rights Amendment.” Forced abortion would be “the law of the land.”[13]

During the Blue Mirage Biden’s purported appointment of a liberal white supremacist Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development was met with protests by the Black Lives Matter organization.[14]


Biden was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and lived there for ten years before moving with his family to Delaware. He became a lawyer in 1969 and was elected to the New Castle County Council in 1970. He was first elected to the U.S. Senate in 1972, when he became the sixth-youngest senator in American history. Biden was re-elected to the upper house of Congress six times and was the fourth most senior senator when he resigned to assume the vice presidency in 2009. Biden was a long-time member and former chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee. He opposed the Gulf War in 1991, but advocated U.S. and NATO intervention in the Bosnian War in 1994 and 1995. He voted in favor of the resolution authorizing the Iraq War in 2002 He has also served as chairman of the [[Senate Judiciary Committee] dealing with issues related to drug policy, crime prevention, and civil liberties. He also chaired the Judiciary Committee during the contentious U.S. Supreme Court nominations of Robert Bork and Clarence Thomas. Biden unsuccessfully sought the Democratic presidential nomination in 1988 and in 2008.

In [[2008 United States presidential election|2008] Biden was chosen as the running mate of Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama. After being elected vice presiden Biden oversaw the failedd infrastructure spending aimed at counteracting the Great Recession and helped formulate U.S. policy toward Iraq up until the withdrawal of U.S. troops in 2011. His ability to negotiate with congressional Republicans helped the Obama administration pass legislation such as the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010, which resolved a taxation deadlock; the Budget Control Act of 2011, which resolved that year's debt ceiling crisis; and the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, which addressed the impending fiscal cliff. Obama and Biden were re-elected in 2012, defeating Republican nominee Mitt Romney and his running mate, Paul Ryan.

In October 2015, after months of speculation, Biden announced he would not seek the presidency in the 2016 elections. In January 2017, Biden was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom with distinction.[15] After completing his second term as vice president, Biden joined the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania, where he was named the Benjamin Franklin Professor of Presidential Practice.[16] Biden announced his 2020 run for president on April 25, 2019.[17]

On April 25 2019 Biden announced his candidacy against President Trump in 2020 and was the immediate Democratic party frontrunner.[18] The Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement at the University of Pennsylvania received $70 million form the Communist Chinese government. The Biden Center did not disclose the money came from China as required by law.[19] Biden personally received $900 000 from the Biden Center money which may have originated with Chinese communists.[20]

File:Klain rigged elections.jpg
Biden chief of staff Ron Klain publicly agrees that elections are rigged.[21]

Contents

Compromised by the CCP

Biden toasts CCP boss Xi Jinping. According to the Black Book of Communism the leftist regime of Beijing has murdered more than 60 million of its own people over its 70 years of existence.

Biden's son Hunter Biden is partnered with the Chinese state. Joe Biden holds a 10% interest. Hunter's entire investment partnership uses Chinese state money from its social security fund to the China Development Bank. The partnership Bohai Harvest RST is actually a subsidiary of the Bank of China.

Though the entire size of the fund cannot be reconstructed a co-founder who is now detained in China reports that Bohai Harvest RST is not the $1-1.5 billion reported but rather $6.5 billion. Hunter's stake as of 2020 is worth at least $50 million if he were to sell it.

All players on the Chinese side of the partnership are linked with influence and intelligence organizations. China uses very innocuous sounding organization names to mask PLA United Front or the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs influence/intelligence operations. Hunter was the target of an operation to compromise him and his father.

The operational mastermind behind the efforts to compromise the Biden family is a man named Yang Jiechi. He is currently the CCP Director of Foreign Affairs leading strategist on America a Politburo member one of the most powerful men in China and Xi Jinping confidant. As Chinese ambassador to the United States when Biden chaired the Senate Foreign Relations Committee he met regularly with Senator Biden. Later he was Minister of Foreign Affairs when the Bohai Harvest RST investment partnership was made official in 2013.

Yang Jiechi is the point person in China for dealing with the United States. This raises major national Security concerns about a Biden administration dealing impartially with an individual in this capacity. These are documented facts from Chinese corporate records such as IPO prospectuses and media and raise very valid concerns about Biden linkages to China.[22]

In a recorded call made sometime after Ye Jianming Hunter's business partner went missing in February 2018 Hunter is heard speaking in an agitated tone

"I get calls from my father to tell me that The New York Times is calling but my old partner Eric who literally has done me harm for I don’t know how long is the one taking the calls because my father will not stop sending the calls to Eric. I have another New York Times reporter calling about my representation of Patrick Ho – the f****** spy chief of China who started the company that my partner who is worth $323 billion founded and is now missing. The richest man in the world is missing who was my partner. He was missing since I last saw him in his $58 million apartment inside a $4 billion deal to build the f****** largest f***** LNG port in the world. And I am receiving calls from the Southern District of New York from the U.S. attorney himself. My best friend in business Devon has named me as a witness without telling me in a criminal case — and my father without telling me."[23]


Positions

Joe Biden's alleged State Department transition team contains several consultants and lobbyists from Albright Stonebridge Group a consulting firm with extensive links to the Chinese Communist Party.[24]

Antifa

Biden refused to denounce terrorist Anarcho-coummunist group of Antifa during the first debate with president Donald Trump. he claimed they are just an idea not organization. he pretend that FBI Bureau’s director Chris Wray told lawmakers that Antifa is an ideology not terrorist group but the fact this is not what Wray said Wray said: “any number of properly predicated investigations into what we would describe as violent anarchist extremists ” which included individuals who identity with Antifa.[25] it seem Biden and Antifa have some relations when someone press Antifa.com Biden election page will appear.[26]

Fracking

During Democratic primarily elections stated that he will end fracking several times.[27][28] after his winning primarily elections he pretend that he is never said that he will not end fracking to his supporters in Pennsylvania and he declined to comment on ending fracking. Washington Post admit that Biden will lose his popularity in Pennsylvania because of his comments on fracking.[29]

Police

Biden flip-flops on defunding police. He changed his positions three times on defunding police.[30] in 8 July 2020 he agree on defunding some level in police. [31] in the first presidential debate Biden accuse police and calling them as ‘systemic racists’. [32]

Supreme court

Biden wants to violate the Constitution by expanding Supreme court members.[33] At presidential debate Biden refused to confirm that.[34]

Illegal Immigration

Biden didn’t consider Illegal immigrants as illegals he call them instead as undocumented immigrants. [35] in presidential debate he admit that he will give citizenship to 11 million illegal immigrants. [36] Biden stated that he want to reform ICE policies without saying which of this policies want to reform. [37]

Gun rights

Biden plan to control people's right to own guns for example banning semi-automatic firearms.[38] he pretend that his plan did not violate the Second Amendment.[39] Biden has no tolerance for anyone who oppose his anti-gun campaign in 10 March 2020 he threatened to fight a civilian worker in Detroit he disrespected him by calling him 'Full of Sh*t' because he mentioned Joe's past statements.[40]

Islam

Biden planed to bring hundreds of thousands of Muslims from radical countries.[41] Biden was criticized when talking to his fellow Muslims He promised to Muslims to let kids learn Sharia law in schools.[42] To convince Muslims to vote for him he used one of the most radical hadiths: whoever sees evil let him change by his hand if he cannot then with his tongue if he cannot then with his heart (by hating) and that's the weakest faith. this is same hadith which used by the September 11 2001 attack perpetrators.[43]

Abortion

Biden has a far left position on abortion he said that he will support abortion in all circumstances including late term abortion.[44] he also said that he will stop any state from preventing abortion.[45] TPP Biden planed for return to Trans-Pacific Partnership despite it damages on US economy.[46] he want to abolish all tariffs which created by president Trump.[47]

China

Biden has good relations with communist government of China. China was one of first countries which welcomed media declaration of Biden winning. vice foreign minister He Yafei said: despite differences in political ideology there could still be opportunities for long-term cooperation. “Multilateralism I will say is very much needed at this critical moment ” he said. “For China the US and the EU all of us should rethink who we are and what roles we can play in the future.[48]

North Korea

Biden criticized president Trump for his meeting with North Korea president Kim Jong-un despite this meeting avoid nuclear war. Biden and Obama failed to shutdown Nuclear program of North Korea they let North Korea to get Nuclear power and now Biden pretend that his policy will force North Korea to shutdown Nuclear power without clarifying what this policy.[49]

Iran

In contradiction on his policy with North Korea Biden will let Iran first country of terrorism sponsoring to get Nuclear power. Biden also criticized president Trump for quick act to assassinate terrorist and war criminal Qasem Soleimani.[50] Biden planned to rejoin to Iranian Nuclear deal he will also canceled all sanctions on Iranian regime and let them to get money to support their terrorist militias.[51] Mullahs government of Iran like China was one of first countries which welcomed media declaration of Biden winning.[52]

Russia

Biden portrays his policy as being more tough against Russia than President Trump's has been [53] although his policy under the Obama administration let Russia expand into Crimea and the Middle East.

Early life and career

See also

References

  1. "Joe Biden takes the oath of Office of Vice President" on YouTube
  2. https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/cory-booker-calls-joe-biden-an-architect-of-mass-incarceration
  3. https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2020/10/24/biden_we_have_put_together_the_most_extensive_and_inclusive_voter_fraud_organization_in_the_history_of_american_politics.html
  4. Gert Bill (November 2020). Biden favors China appeasement. The Washington Times. Retrieved November 14, 2020.
  5. https://thefederalist.com/2020/08/24/white-supremacist-who-organized-charlottesville-race-riots-endorses-joe-biden/
  6. https://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1198289.shtml
  7. https://nypost.com/2020/10/14/hunter-biden-emails-show-leveraging-connections-with-dad-to-boost-burisma-pay/
  8. https://www.nationalreview.com/2020/10/a-collusion-tale-the-bidens-and-china/
  9. https://justthenews.com/accountability/political-ethics/biden-son-brother-pitched-us-infrastructure-deals-chinese
  10. https://www.forexlive.com/news/!/decision-desk-trump-won-the-state-of-north-carolina-20201110
  11. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52-vVoPcJAk
  12. https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2020/11/06/the-election-fallacy-of-the-intellectual-conservatives-beltway-republicans-are-decepticons/
  13. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/10/06/biden-vows-make-roe-v-wade-law-land-abortion-law-overturned/
  14. https://www.dailywire.com/news/black-lives-matter-leader-calls-l-a-mayor-garcetti-a-liberal-white-supremacist-speaks-out-against-potential-cabinet-appointment
  15. Shear, Michael D. (January 12, 2017). "Obama Surprises Joe Biden With Presidential Medal of Freedom". The New York Times. Retrieved October 24, 2018.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  16. Berke, Jeremy (February 7, 2017). "Here's what Joe Biden will do after 8 years as vice president". businessinsider.com. Business Insider. Retrieved February 8, 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  17. Martin, Jonathan; Burns, Alexander (March 7, 2019). "Joe Biden's 2020 Plan Is Almost Complete. Democrats Are Impatient" – via NYTimes.com.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  18. Biden is considered the Konstantin Chernenko of the modern Left.
  19. https://nlpc.org/2020/05/21/complaint-filed-against-university-of-pennsylvania-and-biden-center-for-undisclosed-china-mega-donations/
  20. https://www.dickmorris.com/penn-univ-paid-biden-900000-wont-say-how-much-was-from-china-lunch-alert/#commentblock
  21. https://thefederalist.com/2020/11/12/bidens-pick-for-chief-of-staff-agrees-that-elections-are-rigged/
  22. https://www.baldingsworld.com/2020/10/22/report-on-biden-activities-with-china/
  23. https://twitter.com/DonaldJTrumpJr/status/1321184369562759172
  24. https://thenationalpulse.com/exclusive/biden-un-state-picks-are-ccp-consultants/
  25. Biden Says Antifa Is ‘An Idea Not An Organization’ during Presidential Debate
  26. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHDVYKgLODY
  27. Biden: "Yes" We Should End Fracking
  28. Biden Claimed He Never Wanted to Ban Fracking. He Did
  29. Biden's fracking comments could cost him Pennsylvania ...
  30. https://www.azcentral.com/story/opinion/op-ed/2020/08/26/joe-biden-flips-defund-police-how-can-we-trust-him/3424969001/
  31. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppoUCQLSXFE
  32. https://www.teletrader.com/biden-systemic-racism-in-us-present-beyond-police/news/details/52383496?internal=1&ts=1604959273788&culture=de-CH
  33. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/10/22/us/politics/biden-supreme-court-packing.html
  34. https://www.politico.com/news/2020/10/22/joe-biden-court-packing-judicial-reforms-commission-431157
  35. https://joebiden.com/immigration/
  36. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbzEuEr7Fio
  37. https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/biden-knocks-left-wing-of-democratic-party-we-shouldnt-abolish-ice
  38. https://joebiden.com/gunsafety/#
  39. Joe Biden Told Voters the Second Amendment DOES NOT Protect an Individual Right
  40. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9k2UeoY4uyU
  41. The DNC's Deepening Embrace of Radical Islamists | Opinion
  42. Why Joe Biden Wants to Teach Your Kids Islam
  43. Joe Biden Accidentally Calls for Jihad against America
  44. Supporting Roe Means Supporting Abortion until Birth
  45. Joe Biden: I support abortion ‘under any circumstance’
  46. Prospects dim for early U.S. return to TPP despite Biden win
  47. Prospects for the Trans-Pacific Partnership Trade Deal under a Biden Presidency
  48. US-China relations: Trump divisions could haunt Biden presidency
  49. How would Team Biden handle a showdown with North Korea?
  50. Biden: Trump 'Flat-Out Lied' About Soleimani Dangers ..
  51. Biden will seek to reenter Iran nuclear deal within months former aide says
  52. Iran's president calls on Biden to return to nuclear deal
  53. Kremlin: Biden encouraging hatred of Russia

Early life (1942–1965)

Biden was born on November 20, 1942, at St. Mary's Hospital in Scranton, Pennsylvania,[1] to Catherine Eugenia Biden (née Finnegan)[2] and Joseph Robinette Biden Sr.[3] He was the first of four siblings in a Catholic family, with a sister and two brothers.[4] His mother was of Irish descent, with roots variously attributed to County Louth[5] or County Londonderry.[6][7] His paternal grandparents, Mary Elizabeth (Robinette) and Joseph H. Biden, an oil businessman from Baltimore, Maryland, were of English, French, and Irish ancestry.[7][8] His paternal great-great-great grandfather, William Biden, was born in Sussex, England, and immigrated to the United States. His maternal great-grandfather, Edward Francis Blewitt,[9] was a member of the Pennsylvania State Senate.[10]

Biden's father had been wealthy earlier in his life but suffered several financial setbacks by the time his son was born. For several years, the family had to live with Biden's maternal grandparents, the Finnegans.[11] When the Scranton area fell into economic decline during the 1950s, Biden's father could not find sustained work.[12] In 1953, the Biden family moved into an apartment in Claymont, Delaware, where they lived for several years before again moving to a house in Wilmington, Delaware.[11] Joe Biden Sr. became a successful used car salesman, and the family's circumstances were middle class.[11][12][13]

Biden attended the Archmere Academy in Claymont[14] where he was a standout halfback/wide receiver on the high school football team; he helped lead a perennially losing team to an undefeated season in his senior year.[11][15] He played on the baseball team as well.[11] During these years, he participated in an anti-segregation sit-in at a Wilmington theatre.[16] Academically, he was an above-average student, was considered a natural leader among the students, and was elected class president during his junior and senior years.[17][18] He graduated in 1961.[17]

He earned his bachelor's in 1965 from the University of Delaware, with a double major in history and political science,[19] graduating with a class rank of 506 out of 688.[20] His classmates were impressed by his cramming abilities,[16] and he played halfback with the Blue Hens freshman football team.[15] In 1964, while on spring break in the Bahamas,[21] he met and began dating Neilia Hunter, who was from an affluent background in Skaneateles, New York, and attended Syracuse University.[11][22] He told her that he aimed to become a senator by the age of 30 and then President.[23] He dropped a junior year plan to play for the varsity football team as a defensive back, enabling him to spend more time visiting out of state with her.[15][24]

He then entered Syracuse University College of Law, receiving a half scholarship based on financial need with some additional assistance based on academics.[25] By his own description, he found law school to be "the biggest bore in the world" and pulled many all-nighters to get by.[16][26] During his first year there, he was accused of having plagiarized five of 15 pages of a law review article. Biden said it was inadvertent due to his not knowing the proper rules of citation, and he was permitted to retake the course after receiving an "F" grade, which was subsequently dropped from his record. This incident would later attract attention when further plagiarism accusations emerged in 1987.[26][27] He received his Juris Doctor in 1968,[28] graduating 76th of 85 in his class.[25] Biden was admitted to the Delaware bar in 1969.[28]

Biden received student draft deferments during this period, at the peak of the Vietnam War,[29] and in 1968, he was reclassified by the Selective Service System as not available for service due to having had asthma as a teenager.[29][30] He never took part in anti-war demonstrations, later saying that at the time he was preoccupied with marriage and law school, and "wore sports coats ... not tie-dyed".[31]

Negative impressions of drinking alcohol in the Biden and Finnegan families and in the neighborhood led to Biden becoming a teetotaler.[11][32] He suffered from stuttering through much of his childhood and into his twenties,[33] and says he overcame it by spending many hours reciting poetry in front of a mirror.[18]

Early political career and family life (1966–1972)

On August 27, 1966, while Biden was still a law student, he married Neilia Hunter.[19] They overcame her parents' initial reluctance for her to wed a Roman Catholic, and the ceremony was held in a Catholic church in Skaneateles.[34] They had three children, Joseph R. "Beau" Biden III in 1969, Robert Hunter in 1970, and Naomi Christina in 1971.[19]

During 1968, Biden clerked for six months at a Wilmington law firm headed by prominent local Republican William Prickett and, as he later said, "thought of myself as a Republican".[23][35] He disliked the conservative racial politics of incumbent Democratic Governor of Delaware Charles L. Terry and supported a more liberal Republican, Russell W. Peterson, who defeated Terry in 1968.[23] The local Republicans tried to recruit him, but he resisted due to his distaste for Republican presidential candidate Richard Nixon, and registered as an Independent instead.[23]

In 1969, Biden resumed practicing law in Wilmington, first as a public defender and then at a firm headed by Sid Balick, a locally active Democrat.[16][23] Balick named him to the Democratic Forum, a group trying to reform and revitalize the state party,[36] and Biden switched his registration to Democrat.[23] He also started his own firm, Biden and Walsh.[16] Corporate law, however, did not appeal to him and criminal law did not pay well.[11] He supplemented his income by managing properties.[37]

Later in 1969, Biden ran as a Democrat for the New Castle County Council on a liberal platform that included support for public housing in the suburban area.[16] He won by a solid, two-thousand vote margin in the usually Republican district and in a bad year for Democrats in the state.[16][38] Even before taking his seat, he was already talking about running for the U.S. Senate in a couple of years.[38] He served on the County Council from 1970 to 1972[28] while continuing his private law practice.[39] Biden represented the 4th district on the county council.[40] Among issues he addressed on the council was his opposition to large highway projects that might disrupt Wilmington neighborhoods, including those related to Interstate 95.[41]

1972 U.S. Senate campaign

Biden's entry into the 1972 U.S. Senate election in Delaware presented a unique circumstance. Longtime Delaware political figure and Republican incumbent Senator J. Caleb Boggs was considering retirement, which would likely have left U.S. Representative Pete du Pont and Wilmington Mayor Harry G. Haskell Jr. in a divisive primary fight. To avoid that, U.S. President Richard M. Nixon helped convince Boggs to run again with full party support. No other Democrat wanted to run against Boggs.[16] Biden's campaign had virtually no money and was given no chance of winning.[11] It was managed by his sister Valerie Biden Owens (who would go on to manage his future campaigns) and staffed by other family members, and relied upon handed-out newsprint position papers and meeting voters face-to-face;[42] the small size of the state and lack of a major media market made the approach feasible.[37] He did receive some assistance from the AFL–CIO and Democratic pollster Patrick Caddell.[16] His campaign issues focused on withdrawal from Vietnam, the environment, civil rights, mass transit, more equitable taxation, health care, the public's dissatisfaction with politics-as-usual, and "change".[16][42] During the summer, he trailed by almost 30 percentage points,[16] but his energy level, his attractive young family, and his ability to connect with voters' emotions gave the surging Biden an advantage over the ready-to-retire Boggs.[13] He won the November 7, 1972 election in an upset by a margin of 3,162 votes.[42]

Family deaths

On December 18, 1972, a few weeks after the election, Biden's wife and one-year-old daughter Naomi were killed in an automobile accident while Christmas shopping in Hockessin, Delaware.[19] Neilia Biden's station wagon was hit by a tractor-trailer as she pulled out from an intersection; the truck driver was cleared of any wrongdoing.[43][nb 1] Biden's sons Beau and Hunter survived the accident and were taken to the hospital in fair condition, Beau with a broken leg and other wounds, and Hunter with a minor skull fracture and other head injuries.[45] Doctors soon said both would make full recoveries.[46] Biden considered resigning to care for them,[13] but was persuaded not to by Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield.[47] Subsequent to the accident, Biden commented that the truck driver had been drinking alcohol before the collision, but these allegations were denied by the driver's family and were never substantiated by the police.[48][49]

United States Senate (1973–2009)

Early Senate activities

During his first years in the Senate, Biden focused on legislation regarding consumer-protection and environmental issues and called for greater accountability on the part of government.[50] In mid-1974, freshman Senator Biden was named one of the 200 Faces for the Future by Time magazine, in a profile that mentioned what had happened to his family and characterized Biden as "self-confident" and "compulsively ambitious".[50]

In 1972 Biden re-cycled the racist rhetoric of John C. Calhoun arguing that school segregation was a "positive good" for Blacks. Calhoun famously laid out his doctrine of separation of the races as a civilizing force among Blacks which became Democrat talking points before the Dred Scott decision throughout the Civil War Reconstruction the Jim Crow era and the New Deal. In a Democrat filibuster on the floor of the Senate Calhoun famously said:

Template:Quotebox-float

Biden resurrected the idea that segregation was "for their own good" and that Blacks were grateful for it. Template:Quotebox-float

Biden: "My children are going to grow up in a jungle the jungle being a racial jungle."[51]

Biden led a coalition of segregationists that was opposed by Republican Sen. Edward Brooke the first African American senator elected since Democrats forced the end of Reconstruction after the Civil War. National Public Radio's David Ensor asked Biden "What about a constitutional amendment? Isn’t that what you’re gonna have to end up supporting if you want to stop court ordered busing too?" Biden responded

Template:Quotebox-float Ensor reported that Biden proposed renewing segregation because busing "wasn't working" ("wasn't working" to the electoral advantage of Democrats and not necessarily to the cause of equal rights for Blacks) and Biden was afraid that older liberal colleagues were blind to how Black separatists felt about their children being bused to white schools. Template:Quotebox-float Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination based on race color or national origin in programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance.[52] Biden told the Philadelphia Enquirer on October 12 1975: Template:Quotebox-float George Wallace praised Biden as "one of the outstanding young politicians of America."[53] Wallace is famous for coining the slogan in a gubernatorial inaugural address Template:Quotebox-float The same year Biden authored an amendment to gut Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Politico writes of the whole sordid affair Template:Quotebox-float

File:Biden 1975.jpeg
“I think the Democratic Party could stand a liberal George Wallace — someone who’s not afraid to stand up and offend people someone who wouldn’t pander but would say what the American people know in their gut is right” - Joe Biden

Sen. James Abourezk of South Dakota related how Biden reacted when Abrourezek tried to block the amendment: Template:Quotebox-float The New York Times published a lengthy story on Biden's advocacy of segregation. In a 1977 congressional hearing related to anti-desegregation orders Biden emphasized Template:Quotebox-float Republican Sen. Edward Brooke the first black senator ever to be popularly elected called Biden's amendment “the greatest symbolic defeat for civil rights since 1964.” Brooke accused Biden of leading an assault on integration.

Prof. Ronnie Dunn said opposition to busing was motivated by racism and that without the court-ordered policy Biden probably would not have become vice president in 2009. “What I find ironic is that [Biden] was the vice president under a president who if it hadn’t been for the social interaction that occurred during the era of busing I argue we likely would not have seen the election of Barack Obama." Dunn an Urban Studies professor at Cleveland State University and author of the book Boycotts Busing & Beyond said Biden made the case in favor of maintaining segregation. "That was an argument against desegregation.” Dunn said Biden must address the issue if he runs for president. “People have to be held accountable."[54]

Biden's opposition to integration didn't stop there. HuffPo reported:

File:Annotation 2019-07-05 135356.png
"That little girl was me." The Biden Amendment of 1975 to the 1965 Civil Rights Act restored funding for schools that practiced racial segregation. Democrat presidential contender Kamala Harris was ostracized and silenced after exposing Biden's corrupt and racist history.

Template:Quotebox-float In 1981 Biden said in a Senate hearing “sometimes even George Wallace is right about some things.” Wallace is famous for saying in 1963 “segregation now segregation tomorrow segregation forever.”[55] Biden read the "N" word into the Congressional Record during an open hearing in 1986.[56] In a farewell address to retiring Democrat segregationist Sen. John Stennis Biden said: Template:Quotebox-float When Biden announced his candidacy Politico attempted to poo-poo and explain away Biden and liberal Democrat racism with a back-handed slap at school vouchers for minority students which liberal elites have strenuously opposed ever since the Biden Amendment passed: Template:Quotebox-float Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey condemned the 2020 Democrat primary frontrunner at the Juneteenth annual commemoration of Republican Abraham Lincoln ending slavery in the United States. Template:Quotebox-float


In 1974, Biden was one of the Senate's leading opponents of desegregation busing, a then frequently court-ordered practice of racially integrating schools. Biden said that he supported the aim of school desegregation, but not the practice of busing, which his white constituents bitterly opposed.[57] Such opposition would later lead his party to mostly abandon school desegregation policies.[58]

Biden became ranking minority member of the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary in 1981. In 1984, he was Democratic floor manager for the successful passage of the Comprehensive Crime Control Act. Over time, the tough-on-crime provisions of the legislation became controversial on the left and among criminal justice reform proponents, and in 2019, Biden characterized his role in passing the legislation as a "big mistake".[59][60] Biden and his supporters praised him for modifying some of the Act's worst provisions, and it was his most important legislative accomplishment at that point in time.[61] He first considered running for president in that year, after he gained notice for giving speeches to party audiences that simultaneously scolded and encouraged Democrats.[62]

Senator Biden, Senator Frank Church and President of Egypt Anwar el-Sadat after signing the Egyptian–Israeli Peace Treaty, 1979

Regarding foreign policy, during his first decade in the Senate, Biden focused on arms control issues.[63][64] In response to the refusal of the U.S. Congress to ratify the SALT II Treaty signed in 1979 by Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev and President Jimmy Carter, he took the initiative to meet the Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko, educated him about American concerns and interests, and secured several changes to address objections of the Foreign Relations Committee.[65] When the Reagan administration wanted to interpret the 1972 SALT I Treaty loosely in order to allow the Strategic Defense Initiative to proceed, Biden argued for strict adherence to the treaty's terms.[63] He clashed again with the Reagan administration in 1986 over economic sanctions against South Africa;[64] he received considerable attention when he excoriated Secretary of State George P. Shultz at a Senate hearing because of the administration's support of that country, which continued to practice the apartheid system.[23]

Superpredators

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Biden colluded with segregationists to undermine the Supreme Court decision of Brown vs. Board.

In a 1993 Senate floor speech Biden warned of "predators on our streets" who were "beyond the pale" and said they must be cordoned off from the rest of society because the justice system did not know how to rehabilitate them. Biden described a Template:Quotebox-float Biden went on in the same breath Template:Quotebox-float Biden said that he didn't care "why someone is a malefactor in society" and that criminals needed to be "away from my mother your husband our families." Biden added "we should focus on them now" because "if we don't they will or a portion of them will become the predators 15 years from now."

Biden's comments echoed first lady Hillary Clinton's inflammatory statement about "Superpredators" with "no conscience no empathy" and "we need to bring them to heel."

Biden Crime Bill

Biden was a staunch opponent of school desegregation in the 1970s and leading crusader for mass incarceration in the 1980s and 1990s. Biden described African American felons in the aftermath of the Central Park 5 jogger case as 'predators' too sociopathic to rehabilitate [66] and white supremacist senators as his friends.

Biden boasts as one of his greatest legislative achievements passage of the 1994 Crime bill which locked up 10% of the Black adult male population of the United States.[67]

When President George H.W. Bush asked for a record increase in funding to fight the War on Drugs Biden told a TV interviewer

"In a nutshell the President's plan does not include enough police officers to catch the violent thugs enough prosecutors to convict them enough judges to sentence them or enough prison cells to put them away for a long time."[68][69]

File:1994 Superpredator Act.jpg
The Superpredator Act of 1994. Feinstein Kerry and Biden are clearly visible with President Clinton. The bill is known for its sentencing disparities which led to mass incarceration of Blacks.[70]

Biden Ted Kennedy and Strom Thurmond worked on proposals that raised maximum penalties removed a directive requiring the US Sentencing Commission to take into account prison capacity and created the cabinet-level “drug czar” position. In 1984 they passed the Comprehensive Crime Control Act which among other things abolished parole imposed a less generous cap on “good time” sentence reductions and allowed the Sentencing Commission to issue more punitive guidelines.

Biden bragged on the Senate floor that it was under his and Thurmond's leadership that Congress passed a law sending anyone caught with a rock of cocaine the size of a quarter to jail for a minimum of five years - the notoriously racist hundred-to-one sentencing disparity between crack and powder cocaine. In the same speech Biden took credit for civil asset forfeiture and seizure laws and demanded to know why Papa Bush hadn't sentenced more drug dealers to life in prison or exercise the death penalty once Congress had given him that power.[71]

Biden's version of a new crime bill added more than forty crimes that would be eligible for the death penalty. Biden boasted “we do everything but hang people for jaywalking.”[72] The NAACP and other groups lobbied against the bill.[73] Although the 1991 crime bill was defeated by Republicans the 1994 Biden/Clinton crime bill was passed.[74]

Human Rights Watch reported that in seven states African Americans constituted 80 to 90 percent of all drug offenders even though they were no more likely than whites to use or sell illegal drugs. Prison admissions for drug offenses reached a level in 2000 for African Americans more than 26 times the level they had been under Ronald Reagan.[75] Biden's "social planning" had proven effective.

In May 2019 journalist and historian Shaun King observed

I’ve heard a very dangerous lie being told about how the systems of mass incarceration were built in this nation. I didn’t expect to have to respond this way because I didn’t expect Joe Biden to lie about the 1994 Crime Bill. He wrote it. He fought for it. And the results were devastating. Every single expert on this topic agrees.

This week Joe Biden took the stance that not only is he not sorry for the Crime Bill but that it didn’t even increase mass incarceration. And it’s shameful because either he’s willfully lying which is horrible or he’s just plain ignorant about the true impact of the bill which is also horrible. Either way I have a major problem with it because these laws are still in effect and they are doing damage in our communities every single day 24 hours a day.[76]

The Leftist Jacobin magazine summed up Biden's record: Template:Quotebox-float

Mass incarceration

Sen. Cory Booker told the NAACP convention in Detroit in response to another so-called "criminal justice reform" proposal by Biden: Template:Quotebox-float Biden now advocates for a man sentenced to prison to choose to be incarcerated in a women's prison.[77]

Anita Hill hearings

Biden as chair of the Judiciary Committee called for extended hearings to delay a vote on Thomas and accommodate her last-minute allegations with televised hearings that traumatized the country. Biden told Sen. Arlen Specter that “It was clear to me from the way she was answering the questions [Hill] was lying” about the central theme of her testimony. Biden used homophobia allegations by a Republican Senator that Anita Hill had "certain proclivities" to discredit her testimony to attack Hill's critics while at the same time fight the nomination of an uppity Black. Biden has been widely criticized for his racist sexist and bigotted handling of the hearings.[78][79]

Thomas said he would rather have been the victim of an assassin's bullet than suffer what the hearings did to him.[80] Democrats were outraged that a Republican president would nominate a conservative African-American role model for Black youths to the Supreme Court.

Hill described her private conversation with Joe Biden shortly before he entered the 2020 presidential election as "deeply unsatisfying."[81]

Flagship of the Confederacy

The Southern Manifesto was a document written after the landmark Supreme Court 1954 ruling Brown v. Board of Education which integrated public schools. It was drawn up by legislators in the United States Congress opposed to racial integration in public places. It was signed by politicians from the former Confederate States. All but twenty-eight of the 138 southern Democrat members of Congress signed the Manifesto including 19 of the Majority Democrat Senators.[82]

The Southern Manifest was signed on a large mahogany conference table in Sen. John Stennis' office which Stennis used as his desk and referred to as "the flagship of the Confederacy." The table was used by segregationist and co0signer of the Southen Manifesto before Sen. Richard Russell before his retirement. When Stennis retired in 1988 Biden took over Stennis' office including the conference table. When Biden was elected vice president in 2008 Biden had the conference table moved into the vice president's residence.

Xenophobia

Biden told an audience in 2006

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Richard Spencer officially endorsed Joe Biden. Spencer organized the 2015 Neo-Nazi Charlottesville March and is one of the "fine people" Biden claims Trump praised.[83]

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1988 presidential campaign

Biden ran for the 1988 Democratic presidential nomination, formally declaring his candidacy at the Wilmington train station on June 9, 1987.[84] He was attempting to become the youngest president since John F. Kennedy.[23] When the campaign began, he was considered a potentially strong candidate because of his moderate image, his speaking ability on the stump, his appeal to Baby Boomers, his high-profile position as chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee at the upcoming Robert Bork Supreme Court nomination hearings, and his fundraising appeal.[85][86] He raised $1.7 million in the first quarter of 1987, more than any other candidate.[85][86]

By August 1987, Biden's campaign, whose messaging was confused due to staff rivalries,[87] had begun to lag behind those of Michael Dukakis and Dick Gephardt,[85] although he had still raised more funds than all candidates but Dukakis, and was seeing an upturn in Iowa polls.[86][88] In September 1987, the campaign ran into trouble when he was accused of plagiarizing a speech that had been made earlier that year by Neil Kinnock, leader of the British Labour Party.[89] Kinnock's speech included the lines:

Why am I the first Kinnock in a thousand generations to be able to get to university? [Then pointing to his wife in the audience] Why is Glenys the first woman in her family in a thousand generations to be able to get to university? Was it because all our predecessors were thick?

While Biden's speech included the lines:

I started thinking as I was coming over here, why is it that Joe Biden is the first in his family ever to go to a university? [Then pointing to his wife in the audience] Why is it that my wife who is sitting out there in the audience is the first in her family to ever go to college? Is it because our fathers and mothers were not bright? Is it because I'm the first Biden in a thousand generations to get a college and a graduate degree that I was smarter than the rest?

Biden had in fact cited Kinnock as the source for the formulation on previous occasions.[90][91] But he made no reference to the original source at the August 23 Democratic debate at the Iowa State Fair being reported on,[92] nor in an August 26 interview for the National Education Association.[91] Moreover, while political speeches often appropriate ideas and language from each other, Biden's use came under more scrutiny because he fabricated aspects of his own family's background in order to match Kinnock's.[13][93] Biden was soon found to have earlier that year lifted passages from a 1967 speech by Robert F. Kennedy (for which his aides took the blame), and a short phrase from the 1961 inaugural address of John F. Kennedy; and in two prior years to have done the same with a 1976 passage from Hubert H. Humphrey.[94]

A few days later, Biden's plagiarism incident in law school came to public light.[26] Video was also released showing that when earlier questioned by a New Hampshire resident about his grades in law school, he had stated that he had graduated in the "top half" of his class, that he had attended law school on a full scholarship, and that he had received three degrees in college,[25][95] each of which was untrue or exaggerations of his actual record.[25]

The Kinnock and school revelations were magnified by the limited amount of other news about the nomination race at the time,[96] when most of the public were not yet paying attention to any of the campaigns; Biden thus fell into what The Washington Post writer Paul Taylor described as that year's trend, a "trial by media ordeal".[97] He lacked a strong demographic or political group of support to help him survive the crisis.[88][98] He withdrew from the nomination race on September 23, 1987, saying his candidacy had been overrun by "the exaggerated shadow" of his past mistakes.[99]

After Biden withdrew from the race, it was revealed that the Dukakis campaign had secretly made a video highlighting the Biden–Kinnock comparison and distributed it to news outlets.[100] Later in 1987, the Delaware Supreme Court's Board of Professional Responsibility cleared Biden of the law school plagiarism charges regarding his standing as a lawyer, saying Biden had "not violated any rules".[101]

In February 1988, after suffering from several episodes of increasingly severe neck pain, Biden was taken by long-distance ambulance to Walter Reed Army Medical Center and given lifesaving surgery to correct an intracranial berry aneurysm that had begun leaking;[102][103] the situation was serious enough that a priest had administered last rites at the hospital.[104] While recuperating, he suffered a pulmonary embolism, which represented a major complication.[103] Another operation to repair a second aneurysm, which had caused no symptoms but was also at risk from bursting, was performed in May 1988.[103][105] The hospitalization and recovery kept Biden from his duties in the U.S. Senate for seven months.[106] Biden has had no recurrences or effects from the aneurysms since then.[103] In retrospect, Biden's family came to believe that the early end to his presidential campaign had been a blessing in disguise, for had he still been campaigning in the midst of the primaries in early 1988, he might well have not have stopped to seek medical attention and the condition might have become unsurvivable.[107]

Senate Judiciary Committee

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Joe Biden, U.S. Senate photo

Biden was a long-time member of the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary. He chaired it from 1987 until 1995 and he served as ranking minority member on it from 1981 until 1987 and again from 1995 until 1997.

While chairman, Biden presided over two of the most contentious U.S. Supreme Court confirmation hearings in history, those for Robert Bork in 1987 and Clarence Thomas in 1991.[13] In the Bork hearings, he stated his opposition to Bork soon after the nomination, reversing an approval in an interview of a hypothetical Bork nomination he had made the previous year and angering conservatives who thought he could not conduct the hearings dispassionately.[108] At the close, he won praise for conducting the proceedings fairly and with good humor and courage, as his 1988 presidential campaign collapsed in the middle of the hearings.[108][109] Rejecting some of the less intellectually honest arguments that other Bork opponents were making,[13] Biden framed his discussion around the belief that the U.S. Constitution provides rights to liberty and privacy that extend beyond those explicitly enumerated in the text, and that Bork's strong originalism was ideologically incompatible with that view.[109] Bork's nomination was rejected in the committee by a 9–5 vote,[109] and then rejected in the full Senate by a 58–42 margin.[110]

In the Thomas hearings, Biden's questions on constitutional issues were often long and convoluted, sometimes such that Thomas forgot the question being asked.[111] Viewers of the high-profile hearings were often annoyed by Biden's style.[112] Thomas later wrote that despite earlier private assurances from the senator, Biden's questions had been akin to a beanball.[113] The nomination came out of the committee without a recommendation, with Biden opposed.[13] In part due to his own bad experiences in 1987 with his presidential campaign, Biden was reluctant to let personal matters enter into the hearings.[111] Biden initially shared with the committee, but not the public, Anita Hill's sexual harassment charges, on the grounds she was not yet willing to testify.[13] After she did, Biden did not permit other witnesses to testify further on her behalf, such as Angela Wright (who made a similar charge) and experts on harassment.[114] Biden said he was striving to preserve Thomas's right to privacy and the decency of the hearings.[111][114] The nomination was approved by a 52–48 vote in the full Senate, with Biden again opposed.[13] During and afterward, Biden was strongly criticized by liberal legal groups and women's groups for having mishandled the hearings and having not done enough to support Hill.[114] Biden subsequently sought out women to serve on the Judiciary Committee and emphasized women's issues in the committee's legislative agenda.[13] In April 2019, Biden called Hill to express regret over his treatment of her; after the conversation, Hill said that she remained deeply unsatisfied.[115]

Biden was involved in crafting many federal crime laws. He spearheaded the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, also known as the Biden Crime Law, which included the Federal Assault Weapons Ban, which expired in 2004 after its ten-year sunset period and was not renewed.[116][117] It also included the landmark Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), which contains a broad array of measures to combat domestic violence.[118] In 2000, the Supreme Court ruled in United States v. Morrison that the section of VAWA allowing a federal civil remedy for victims of gender-motivated violence exceeded Congress's authority and therefore was unconstitutional.[119] Congress reauthorized VAWA in 2000 and 2005.[120] Biden has said, "I consider the Violence Against Women Act the single most significant legislation that I've crafted during my 35-year tenure in the Senate."[121] In 2004 and 2005, Biden enlisted major American technology companies in diagnosing the problems of the Austin, Texas-based National Domestic Violence Hotline, and to donate equipment and expertise to it in a successful effort to improve its services.[122][123]

Biden was critical of the actions of Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr during the 1990s Whitewater controversy and Lewinsky scandal investigations, and said "it's going to be a cold day in hell" before another Independent Counsel is granted the same powers.[124] Biden voted to acquit on both charges during the impeachment of President Clinton.[125]

As chairman of the International Narcotics Control Caucus, Biden wrote the laws that created the U.S. "Drug Czar", who oversees and coordinates national drug control policy. In April 2003, he introduced the controversial Reducing Americans' Vulnerability to Ecstasy Act, also known as the RAVE Act. He continued to work to stop the spread of "date rape drugs" such as flunitrazepam, and drugs such as Ecstasy and Ketamine. In 2004, he worked to pass a bill outlawing steroids like androstenedione, the drug used by many baseball players.[13]

Biden's "Kids 2000" legislation established a public/private partnership to provide computer centers, teachers, Internet access, and technical training to young people, particularly to low-income and at-risk youth.[126]

Senate Foreign Relations Committee

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Senator Biden travels with President Clinton and other officials to Bosnia in 1997

Biden was a long-time member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations. In 1997, he became the ranking minority member and chaired the committee in January 2001 and from June 2001 through 2003. When Democrats re-took control of the Senate following the 2006 elections, Biden again assumed the top spot on the committee in 2007.[127] Biden was generally a liberal internationalist in foreign policy.[63][128] He collaborated effectively with important Republican Senate figures such as Richard Lugar and Jesse Helms and sometimes went against elements of his own party.[127][128] Biden was also co-chairman of the NATO Observer Group in the Senate.[129] A partial list covering this time showed Biden meeting with some 150 leaders from nearly 60 countries and international organizations.[130] Biden held frequent hearings as chairman of the committee, as well as holding many subcommittee hearings during the three times he chaired the Subcommittee on European Affairs.[63]

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Biden gives an opening statement and questions at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Iraq in 2007

Biden became interested in the Yugoslav Wars after hearing about Serbian abuses during the Croatian War of Independence in 1991.[63] Once the Bosnian War broke out, Biden was among the first to call for the "lift and strike" policy of lifting the arms embargo, training Bosnian Muslims and supporting them with NATO air strikes, and investigating war crimes.[63][127] Both the George H. W. Bush administration and Clinton administration were reluctant to implement the policy, fearing Balkan entanglement.[63][128] In April 1993, Biden spent a week in the Balkans and held a tense three-hour meeting with Serbian leader Slobodan Milošević.[131] Biden related that he told Milošević, "I think you're a damn war criminal and you should be tried as one."[131] Biden wrote an amendment in 1992 to compel the Bush administration to arm the Bosnians, but deferred in 1994 to a somewhat softer stance preferred by the Clinton administration, before signing on the following year to a stronger measure sponsored by Bob Dole and Joe Lieberman.[131] The engagement led to a successful NATO peacekeeping effort.[63] Biden has called his role in affecting Balkans policy in the mid-1990s his "proudest moment in public life" that related to foreign policy.[128] In 1999, during the Kosovo War, Biden supported the NATO bombing campaign against Serbia and Montenegro,[63] and co-sponsored with his friend John McCain the McCain-Biden Kosovo Resolution, which called on President Clinton to use all necessary force, including ground troops, to confront Milosevic over Serbian actions in Kosovo.[128][132] In 1998, Congressional Quarterly named Biden one of "Twelve Who Made a Difference" for playing a lead role in several foreign policy matters, including NATO enlargement and the successful passage of bills to streamline foreign affairs agencies and punish religious persecution overseas.[133]

Biden had voted against authorization for the Gulf War in 1991,[128] siding with 45 of the 55 Democratic senators; he said the U.S. was bearing almost all the burden in the anti-Iraq coalition.[134] Biden was a strong supporter of the 2001 war in Afghanistan, saying "Whatever it takes, we should do it."[135] Regarding Iraq, Biden stated in 2002 that Saddam Hussein was a threat to national security, and that there was no option but to eliminate that threat.[136] In October 2002, Biden voted in favor of the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq, justifying the Iraq War.[128] While he soon became a critic of the war and viewed his vote as a "mistake", he did not push to require a U.S. withdrawal.[128][131] He supported the appropriations to pay for the occupation, but argued repeatedly that the war should be internationalized, that more soldiers were needed, and that the Bush administration should "level with the American people" about the cost and length of the conflict.[127][132]

By late 2006, Biden's stance had shifted, and he opposed the troop surge of 2007,[128][131] saying General David Petraeus was "dead, flat wrong" in believing the surge could work.[137] Biden was instead a leading advocate for dividing Iraq into a loose federation of three ethnic states.[138] In November 2006, Biden and Leslie H. Gelb, President Emeritus of the Council on Foreign Relations, released a comprehensive strategy to end sectarian violence in Iraq.[139] Rather than continuing the present approach or withdrawing, the plan called for "a third way": federalizing Iraq and giving Kurds, Shiites, and Sunnis "breathing room" in their own regions.[140] In September 2007, a non-binding resolution passed the Senate endorsing such a scheme.[139] However, the idea was unfamiliar, had no political constituency, and failed to gain traction.[137] Iraq's political leadership united in denouncing the resolution as a de facto partitioning of the country, and the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad issued a statement distancing itself.[139]

In March 2004, Biden secured the brief release of Libyan democracy activist and political prisoner Fathi Eljahmi, after meeting with leader Muammar Gaddafi in Tripoli.[141][142] In May 2008, Biden sharply criticized President George W. Bush for his speech to Israel's Knesset in which he suggested that some Democrats were acting in the same way some Western leaders did when they appeased Hitler in the runup to World War II. Biden stated: "This is bullshit. This is malarkey. This is outrageous. Outrageous for the president of the United States to go to a foreign country, sit in the Knesset ... and make this kind of ridiculous statement." Biden later apologized for using the expletive. Biden further stated, "Since when does this administration think that if you sit down, you have to eliminate the word 'no' from your vocabulary?"[143]

Delaware matters

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Biden receiving a 1997 tour of a new facility at Delaware's Dover Air Force Base

Biden was a familiar figure to his Delaware constituency, by virtue of his daily train commuting from there,[13] and generally sought to attend to state needs.[144] Biden was a strong supporter of increased Amtrak funding and rail security;[144] he hosted barbecues and an annual Christmas dinner for the Amtrak crews, and they would sometimes hold the last train of the night a few minutes so he could catch it.[37][144] He earned the nickname "Amtrak Joe" as a result (and in 2011, Amtrak's Wilmington Station was named the Joseph R. Biden Jr. Railroad Station, in honor of the over 7,000 trips he made from there).[145][146] He was an advocate for Delaware military installations, including Dover Air Force Base and New Castle Air National Guard Base.[147]

In 1975, Biden broke from liberal orthodoxy when he took legislative action to limit desegregation busing.[61] In doing so, he said busing was a "bankrupt idea [that violated] the cardinal rule of common sense," and that his opposition would make it easier for other liberals to follow suit.[61] Three years later, Wilmington's federally mandated cross-district busing plan generated much turmoil, and in trying to legislate a compromise solution, Biden found himself alienating both black and white voters for a while.[148]

Beginning in 1991, Biden served as an adjunct professor at the Widener University School of Law, Delaware's only law school, teaching a seminar on constitutional law.[149][150] The seminar was one of Widener's most popular, often with a waiting list for enrollment.[150] Biden typically co-taught the course with another professor, taking on at least half the course minutes and sometimes flying back from overseas to make one of the classes.[151][152]

Biden was a sponsor of bankruptcy legislation during the 2000s, which was sought by MBNA, one of Delaware's largest companies, and other credit card issuers.[13] Biden allowed an amendment to the bill to increase the homestead exemption for homeowners declaring bankruptcy and fought for an amendment to forbid anti-abortion felons from using bankruptcy to discharge fines; the overall bill was vetoed by Bill Clinton in 2000 but then finally passed as the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act in 2005, with Biden supporting it.[13]

Biden held up trade agreements with Russia when that country stopped importing U.S. chickens. The downstate Sussex County region is the nation's top chicken-producing area.[144]

In 2007, Biden requested and gained $67 million worth of projects for his constituents through congressional earmarks.[153]

Reputation

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Biden's official Senate photo (2005)

Following his initial election in 1972, Biden was re-elected to six additional terms, in the elections of 1978, 1984, 1990, 1996, 2002, and 2008, usually getting about 60 percent of the vote.[144] He did not face strong opposition; Pete du Pont, then governor, chose not to run against him in 1984.[61] Biden spent 28 years as a junior senator due to the two-year seniority of his Republican colleague William V. Roth Jr. After Roth was defeated for re-election by Tom Carper in 2000, Biden became Delaware's senior senator. He then became the longest-serving senator in Delaware history[154] and, as of 2018, was the 18th longest serving senator in the history of the United States.[155] In May 1999, Biden became the youngest senator to cast 10,000 votes.[133]

With a net worth between $59,000 and $366,000, and almost no outside income or investment income, Biden was consistently ranked as one of the least wealthy members of the Senate.[156][157][158] Biden stated that he was listed as the second-poorest member in Congress; he was not proud of the distinction, but attributed it to having been elected early in his career.[159] Biden realized early in his senatorial career how vulnerable poorer public officials are to offers of financial contributions in exchange for policy support, and he pushed campaign finance reform measures during his first term.[61]

During his years as a senator, Biden amassed a reputation for loquaciousness,[160][161][162] with his questions and remarks during Senate hearings being known as long-winded.[163][164] He has been a strong speaker and debater and a frequent and effective guest on Sunday morning talk shows.[164] In public appearances, he is known to deviate from prepared remarks at will.[165] According to political analyst Mark Halperin, he has shown "a persistent tendency to say silly, offensive, and off-putting things";[164] The New York Times writes that Biden's "weak filters make him capable of blurting out pretty much anything".[162] Journalist James Traub has written that "Biden's vanity and his regard for his own gifts seem considerable even by the rarefied standards of the U.S. Senate."[137]

The political writer Howard Fineman has said, "Biden is not an academic, he's not a theoretical thinker, he's a great street pol. He comes from a long line of working people in Scranton—auto salesmen, car dealers, people who know how to make a sale. He has that great Irish gift."[37] Political columnist David S. Broder has viewed Biden as having grown since he came to Washington and since his failed 1988 presidential bid: "He responds to real people—that's been consistent throughout. And his ability to understand himself and deal with other politicians has gotten much much better."[37] Traub concludes that "Biden is the kind of fundamentally happy person who can be as generous toward others as he is to himself."[137]

2008 presidential campaign

Biden had thought about running for president again ever since his failed 1988 bid.[nb 2]

Biden declared his candidacy for President on January 31, 2007, after having discussed running for months prior.[168] Biden made a formal announcement to Tim Russert on Meet the Press, stating he would "be the best Biden I can be".[169] In January 2006, Delaware newspaper columnist Harry F. Themal wrote that Biden "occupies the sensible center of the Democratic Party".[170] Themal concludes that this is the position Biden desires, and that in a campaign "he plans to stress the dangers to the security of the average American, not just from the terrorist threat, but from the lack of health assistance, crime, and energy dependence on unstable parts of the world".[170]

During his campaign, Biden focused on the war in Iraq and his support for the implementation of the Biden-Gelb plan to achieve political success. He touted his record in the Senate as the head of major congressional committees and his experience on foreign policy. Despite speculation to the contrary,[171] Biden rejected the notion of accepting the position of Secretary of State, focusing only on the presidency. At a 2007 campaign event, Biden said, "I know a lot of my opponents out there say I'd be a great Secretary of State. Seriously, every one of them. Do you watch any of the debates? 'Joe's right, Joe's right, Joe's right.'"[172] Other candidates' comments that "Joe is right" in the Democratic debates were converted into a Biden campaign theme and ad.[173] In mid-2007, Biden stressed his foreign policy expertise compared to Obama's, saying of the latter, "I think he can be ready, but right now I don't believe he is. The presidency is not something that lends itself to on-the-job training."[174] Biden also said that Obama was copying some of his foreign policy ideas.[137] Biden was noted for his one-liners on the campaign trail, saying of Republican then-frontrunner Rudy Giuliani at the debate on October 30, 2007, in Philadelphia, "There's only three things he mentions in a sentence: a noun, and a verb and 9/11."[175] Overall, Biden's debate performances were an effective mixture of humor, and sharp and surprisingly disciplined comments.[176]

Biden made remarks during the campaign that attracted controversy. On the day of his January 2007 announcement, he spoke of fellow Democratic candidate and Senator Barack Obama: "I mean, you got the first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean and a nice-looking guy, I mean, that's a storybook, man."[177][nb 3] This comment undermined his campaign as soon as it began and significantly damaged his fund-raising capabilities;[176] it later took second place on Time magazine's list of Top 10 Campaign Gaffes for 2007.[179] Biden had earlier been criticized in July 2006 for a remark he made about his support among Indian Americans: "I've had a great relationship. In Delaware, the largest growth in population is Indian-Americans moving from India. You cannot go to a 7-Eleven or a Dunkin' Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent. I'm not joking."[180] Biden later said the remark was not intended to be derogatory.[180][nb 4]

Overall, Biden had difficulty raising funds, struggled to draw people to his rallies, and failed to gain traction against the high-profile candidacies of Obama and Senator Hillary Clinton;[182] he never rose above single digits in the national polls of the Democratic candidates. In the initial contest on January 3, 2008, Biden placed fifth in the Iowa caucuses, garnering slightly less than one percent of the state delegates.[183] Biden withdrew from the race that evening, saying "There is nothing sad about tonight. ... I feel no regret."[184]

Despite the lack of success, Biden's stature in the political world rose as the result of his 2008 campaign.[176] In particular, it changed the relationship between Biden and Obama. Although the two had served together on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, they had not been close, with Biden having resented Obama's quick rise to political stardom,[137][185] and Obama having viewed Biden as garrulous and patronizing.[186] Now, having gotten to know each other during 2007, Obama appreciated Biden's campaigning style and appeal to working class voters, and Biden was convinced that Obama was "the real deal".[185][186]


2020 Presidential campaign

The Chaldean Catholic Cathedral in El Cajon California was defaced with swastikas Biden 2020 upside down crosses and BLM imagery.[187]

More than 26% of African Americans refused to be put back in chains by Joseph Biden and left the Democrat plantation.[188] Credible rape allegations and failing cognitive skills of the Democrat nominee were largely ignored by the liberal biased mainstream media.[189] Former Bernie Sanders co-chair Nina Turner said voting for Joe Biden is like "eating half a bowl of s***."[190][191]

In the immediate aftermath of a record number of Latinos voting for President Trump Biden's former boss Barack Obama launched a vile and racist attack on people of Hispanic heritage.[192] A common question circulating on social media was "Who did you for Trump or that senile old racist?"

The largest voter fraud organization ever

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Dozens of documented examples of election shenanigans.[193]

The probability of mail-in voter fraud creating chaos after Election Day November 3 2020 is very real. Some states may force residents to use mail-in ballots during the current health emergency. Voting by mail makes it easier to commit fraud intimidate voters and destroy the protections of the secret ballot. Without the oversight of election and polling officials mail-in ballots are the ballots most vulnerable to being altered stolen or forged. Fraud by duplicate voting can occur once by absentee or mail-in ballot and then again in person. Employees of private companies hired to contact and register voters have been known to change party affiliations of voters and forge signatures on voter registration forms among other things.

Ten days before the election Biden went back into hiding and boasted of having assembled "the most extensive and inclusive voter fraud organization in history.”[194] When Democrats want to tilt elections in their favor outside the ballot box Marc Elias of Perkins Coie is the go-to guy. Perkins Coie is the Democratic law firm paid by the Hillary Clinton campaign that hired Fusion GPS to dig up dirt on Donald Trump in 2016. They failed but still compiled the Steele dossier full of foreign-solicited lies about Trump and Russia which was leaked by Obama intelligence officials to try to sabotage the new president’s administration sow doubt in his election victory and invalidate the votes of 63 million Americans. From Wisconsin to Nevada to California Marc Elias and the Democrats pushed lawsuits disguised as “election reform” to water down important election safeguards and increase the opportunity for fraud abuse and corruption. In August 2020 Politico reported

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Dominion election equipment with Chinese components used in 28 states.[195]
Coronavirus has turned the Democratic Party’s voter contact program one operative said into something more like a tech support operation than a traditional door-knocking effort.....Priorities USA the Democratic super PAC is spending $24 million on voter mobilization which includes vote-by-mail education. Fair Fight a group founded by Stacey Abrams has rolled out voter protection programs in 17 states....

Meanwhile President Donald Trump’s recent attacks on the USPS and on mail-voting is raising concern among voters operatives say.

“We've seen such an increase from young people in terms of concern about their ballot casting ” said Jared DeLoof the states director of NextGen America which targets younger voters. “They want to vote they want to make sure that that vote is going to count.” [...]

Democrats believe they will also have to follow up with some voters after their ballot has been cast in an effort to help them fix ballots that have been rejected for technical reasons. State rules vary widely on if or how voters can correct their ballots and the time windows to do so can be short.

This is the other half of the party’s vote-by-mail efforts: a sprawling legal effort that spans every battleground state and is costing tens of millions of dollars. Priorities USA just one of Elias’ clients has expanded its voting litigation budget to $32 million.

“One of the features of vote by mail is that between the point that the voter cast the ballot and the point that the ballot is counted several things have to go right ” Elias said in an interview. “One is that the ballot has to be received by the election officials in time. ... And the second is that the ballot needs to be verified and accepted.”

Elias who was the lead attorney in former Sen. Al Franken’s (D-Minn.) 2008 recount victory and the general counsel for Hillary Clinton and John Kerry’s presidential campaigns is pursuing what he calls “four pillars” of legal changes to election laws during coronavirus. The first that mail ballots should include paid postage with them has some cross-partisan support.

The other three do not locking Elias in a wide-range legal fight with Republicans all over the country including the Republican National Committee and its legal budget of at least $20 million. Those fights are over Elias’ push to mandate that states count ballots postmarked by Election Day but received after the fact; overhauling signature matching laws which Elias derides as based on pseudoscience; and allowing for third parties to collect and turn in voters’ sealed absentee ballots which Democrats call “community collection” and Republicans largely deride as “ballot harvesting.”

“One thing you do is you make sure that people whose ballot is being challenged based on signature matching that the people that are doing that have been trained are applying uniform non-discriminatory standards. And most importantly the voter is notified and has an opportunity to cure ” Elias said of his legal strategy. (A cure process mandates that a state contacts voters whose ballots have been rejected to give them the ability to fix — or cure — their ballot.)

Several Democratic-backed lawsuits have also pushed to expand who can cast absentee ballots. In 44 states any voter can at a minimum request an absentee ballot if they choose to do so and some states have changed that requirement as a response to the pandemic. [...]

Republicans argue that allowing for outside parties to collect and deliver ballots could lead to coercion or fraud. [...]

Depending on how close the races for the White House and battleground Senate seats are "we could be headed for a Bush v. Gore situation in every battleground state depending how close the results are."[196]

The RNC and the Trump campaign pushed back against the Democrats’ assault on the integrity of elections. All across the country Democrats tried to use coronavirus and the courts to legalize ballot harvesting implement a nationwide mail-in ballot system and eliminate nearly every safeguard in our elections.

One in five mail in ballots have been rejected in several 2020 elections. Nearly two-thirds (62%) say there is fraud in U.S. elections and that fraud would concern them under Democrats’ nationwide mail-in ballot system. Americans overwhelmingly approve of the safeguards Democrats are suing to eliminate like signature matching (84%) voter identification (80%) and a ballot receipt deadline of election day (83%). Voters also oppose (67%) allowing campaign workers to collect mail-in ballots also known as ballot harvesting.[197]

Biden-Burisma and Big Tech election interference

Biden family text with Hunter telling his sister Naomi that thier "Pop" Joe Biden received 50% of the Burisma kickbacks.[198]
Documents show payments from Burisma to Hunter Biden.[199][200][201][202]

For first time in American history social media companies took direct action against a major U.S. publisher [203] The New York Post when it published a story on former VP Biden's collusion with Burisma executives and Ukrainian oligarchs.[204] The Post is among the top five newspapers by circulation in the United States.

Big Tech giants Facebook and Twitter began interfering in the presidential election by blocking links to the article on the Biden-Burisma scandal.[205] Facebook and Twitter have many foreign stockholders.[206] Former James Comey general counsel James A. Baker (DOJ) who was complicit in the Obamagate and FISA abuse scandals is Twitter's lead counsel.[207]

One email from a Burisma executive reads Template:Quotebox-float Former Vice President Biden has repeatedly lied about having any knowledge of his son Hunter's dealings with Burisma. Hunter Biden earned in excess of $3 million while serving on Burisma's board of directors during the Obama administration. The former vice president bragged to the Council on Foreign Relations that he threatened the President of Ukraine with withholding $1.8 Billion in foreign aid and loan guarantees which the former vice president was in charge of unless a prosecutor investigating Burisma kickbacks to the Biden family was fired.

A firestorm erupted over Big Tech censorship of the news and calls for repealing their Section 230 immunity. Youtube began banning dozens of top Conservative channels.[208] Twitter continued banning people who posted the Hunter Biden story.[209] Twitter banned White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany for sharing the Hunter and Joe Biden corruption article.[210]Senate Judiciary Committee announced Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey will be subpoenaed over censorship of NY Post.[211] Wikipedia editors censored the Hunter Biden Bombshell and called the New York Post an ‘unreliable’ source.[212] Twitter locked the Trump Campaign account less than 3 weeks before the 2020 Presidential election.[213] Rep. Jim Jordan posted the Biden-Burisma story on a federal government website after Twitter censors House Judiciary GOP at which point the link was promptly censored by Twitter.[214] Twitter itself shut down completely.[215][216] Google was reported to be meddling in U.S. Senate elections.[217] A Rasmussen Poll shortly after found 61% of Likely U.S. Voters now think the impact on politics of social media like Facebook and Twitter has been bad for the nation.[218]

Facebook and Twitter are no longer service carriers of electronic information but rather now acting as publishers and broadcasters of news. Hence their immunity from broadcasting libelous information on their platforms - such as accusations of President Trump being a Russian spy for example - should be revoked. Yahoo News! reported:

Instead of simply asking pertinent questions or debunking the [New York] Post’s reporting a media blackout was initiated. A number of well-known journalists warned colleagues and their sizable social-media audiences not to share the story. By the afternoon Twitter had joined Facebook in suppressing the article not only barring its users from sharing it with followers but barring them sharing it through direct messages as well. It locked the accounts of White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany the Post and many others for retweeting the story.

Twitter initially cited its “Hacked Materials Policy” and a “lack of authoritative reporting” as justification for censoring the Post one of the most widely read papers in the nation. Though the reliability of the story is yet to be determined Twitter has offered no evidence that any of the information was illegally obtained. No similar standard was applied when the New York Times published Trump’s tax returns even though anyone who had legal access to them is likely to have broken the law in sharing them with the Times. Whatever the case it’s all in the public record now.

A healthy democracy with a properly functioning and independent press would debate investigate and rigorously fact check new information. They wouldn’t work to squelch a story. It’s certainly not the job of giant tech companies who claim to function as neutral platforms to decide what news consumers can or can’t handle.

The most generous reading of Twitter and Facebook’s actions is that the rules are evolving messy and inadvertently unfair. A less generous — but more plausible — reading is that the tech giants single out specific stories damaging to progressives’ preferred presidential candidate. It will backfire.

For one thing it further damages the reputation of Big Tech. For another it renders the industry more susceptible to a new regulatory regime already being championed by some in Congress. Mostly however it just makes the story they’re trying to suppress a far bigger deal.[219]

Glenn Greenwald writing in The Intercept remarked Template:Quotebox-float Google saw a spike in searches for ‘can I change my vote’ after the release of a Hunter Biden sex tape.[220] The New York Post Gateway Pundit and Big League Politics all were placed on Twitter's suspension hit lit the final week before election day.[221]

A study from the Media Research Center showed that Twitter and Facebook censored President Donald Trump and the president’s affiliated campaign accounts at least 65 times in 2019 ans 2020 while leaving Biden untouched.[222]

The laptop from hell: Hunter becomes the hunted

The former vice president's son Hunter never visited Ukraine did not speak Ukrainian had no experience in the oil and gas industry received over $50 000 a month in wire transfers from Burisma in which he paid half to his father [224] was dishonorably discharged from the Navy for cocaine addiction returned a rental car with crack and paraphernalia in it [225] had a baby out of wedlock whom he refused to pay child support for until ordered by a court while he was having an affair with his widowed sister-in-law.[226] Biden was paid $3.5 million from the wife of the Moscow mayor to launder $200 million in violation of the Magnitsky Act.[227] Tens of thousands of dollars in payments to an Eastern European prostitution and human tafficing ring were also discovered.[228] Professor Jonathan Turley noted the obvious facts: Template:Quotebox-float Senate lawmakers formally requested the Department of Justice to appoint a special counsel to investigate foreign payments to the Biden family: Template:Quotebox-float In a recorded call made sometime after Ye Jianming Hunter's business partner went missing in February 2018 Hunter is heard speaking in an agitated tone

"I get calls from my father to tell me that The New York Times is calling but my old partner Eric who literally has done me harm for I don’t know how long is the one taking the calls because my father will not stop sending the calls to Eric. I have another New York Times reporter calling about my representation of Patrick Ho – the f****** spy chief of China who started the company that my partner who is worth $323 billion founded and is now missing. The richest man in the world is missing who was my partner. He was missing since I last saw him in his $58 million apartment inside a $4 billion deal to build the f****** largest f***** LNG port in the world. And I am receiving calls from the Southern District of New York from the U.S. attorney himself. My best friend in business Devon has named me as a witness without telling me in a criminal case — and my father without telling me."[229]

Election rigging

NBC News reported in December 2019

"Chinese manufacturers can be forced to cooperate with requests from Chinese intelligence officials to share any information about the technology and therefore pose a risk for U.S. companies NBC News analyst Frank Figliuzzi a former assistant director of the FBI for counterintelligence said. That could include intellectual property such as source code materials or blueprints. There is also the concern of machines shipped with undetected vulnerabilities or backdoors that could allow tampering."[230]

In January 2020 Dominion Election Systems CEO John Poulos testified before Congress that Dominion machines are composed of parts manufactured in China from "screen on the interface down to the chip component level." Under questioning from Democrat Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren Poulos claimed "there’s no option for manufacturing of those in the United States."[231] The Chinese Communist Party endorsed Biden for president in the 2020 presidential election.[232]

Biden Putsch

Marxist subversives John Nagl and Paul Yingling two veterans of U.S. military service penned an open letter to chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley chalk full of Democrat fake news talking points in support of the Marxist insurrection and advocating oath breaking.[233] Nagl and Yingling wrote:

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Pulitzer Prize winning leftist columnist Jerry Saltz declared: “Republicanism is no longer a political problem; Republicanism is a social problem…It must be treated in the same way coronavirus is treated: it has to be isolated and snuffed-out by repressing it in about 70% of the general population."[234] [235]

Template:Quotebox-float Gen. Milley rebuked the coup plotters saying Template:Quotebox-float On June 10 2020 on the The Daily Show with Trevor Noah Democratic presidential nominee Joseph R. Biden implied that if Democrat Party officials nationwide stuffed the ballot box to defeat incumbent President Donald Trump [236] Biden was already in collusion with disgruntled retired military officials to stage an illegal coup to remove President Trump from office before a contested election could be resolved.[237][238][239] Biden said Template:Quotebox-float

Junta appointments

Racism

File:Biden redskins.jpeg
CNN airbrushed out the Washington Redskins logo from this 1970s photo of Joe Biden and son. The Washington NFL team dropped the name 'Redskins' in June 2020 because it was deemed "racist".[245]

In addition to Biden's longstanding alliance with fellow Democrat segregationists in the U.S. Senate Biden is known for a history of making racially insensitive remarks. Reportedly Biden’s political approach to race has long been geared toward assuaging the racial anxieties of white voters. Biden exposed his racial insensitivity towards the 2008 Democratic Presidential candidate and running mate Barack Obama when he declared "I mean you got the first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean and a nice-looking guy." He later claimed "Barack Hussein Obama is change enough for most people."[246] Biden called Confederate flag advocates "very fine people"[247] and a disproportionate share of the U.S. military which are minorities as "stupid bastards"[248]

You ain't Black

Democrat presidential nominee former Vice President Joe Biden made a particularly offensive and egregious racist comment toward African American's during a radio interview.[249] Biden's comments were an effort at voter intimidation. Black Entertainment Television (BET) co-founder Bob Johnson called him out saying in part Template:Quotebox-float

Biden was roundly criticized by Black leaders for his racist comments.[250]

Biden won the Democrat presidential nomination when South Carolina Rep. James Clyburn endorsed him and the dominos of the Democrat machine fell into place. In short choreographed order the remaining white candidates Amy Klobuchar Pete Buttigieg Tom Steyer Michael Bloomberg and a host of local officials began goosestepping in lockstep. Kamala Harris [251] Cory Booker Julian Castro and Tulsi Gabbard had been driven out earlier in a rigged process that allowed rich white billionaires - Steyer and Bloomberg - to buy their way in once all the minority candidates were forced out.[252] Clyborn admitted he cringed when he heard Biden's racist attack on Black people.[253]

Biden cynically tried to take advantage of George Floyd's killing which occurred only days later to repair his relations with Blacks by attacking the police and accusing them of systemic racism. Police groups and unions which Biden courted since the 1990s on behalf of the Clinton administration with the Biden Crime Bill mass incarceration and effort to put 100 000 new cops on the street to deal with "Superpredators" responded by withdrawing their support.[254]

When Biden supporters tore down statues of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson because they were slave owners Biden never condemned the violence and vandalism and accused President Trump of being America's first racist president. Biden conveniently overlooked the racism of President's Woodrow Wilson and Lyndon Johnson and a dozen other Democrat presidents who were slave owners. Charlemagne tha God responded that he wished Biden would just "shut the eff up forever."[255]

Biden Amendment repeal of portions of the Civil Rights Act

File:Biden segregation.png 1718483346.png
Biden called segregation "a matter of Black pride" and pushed for a Constitutional Amendment to outlaw Court ordered de-segregation.[256]

The debate over the crimes of the Democrats slave power[257] was reopened in 2019 while some far leftists were pushing for slave reparations.[258] During Sen. Biden's decades long collaboration with segregationist Senators there is no record of Biden ever calling them "clown's "racists" or telling them to "shut up". Contrarily Biden had nothing but kind and loving words of praise at their retirements and funerals.

In 1972 Biden re-cycled the racist rhetoric of John C. Calhoun arguing that school segregation was a "positive good" for Blacks. Calhoun famously laid out his doctrine of separation of the races as a civilizing force among Blacks which became Democrat talking points before the Dred Scott decision throughout the Civil War Reconstruction the Jim Crow era and the New Deal. In a Democrat filibuster on the floor of the Senate Calhoun famously said: Template:Quotebox-float Biden resurrected the idea that segregation was "for their own good" and that Blacks were grateful for it. Template:Quotebox-float

Biden: "My children are going to grow up in a jungle the jungle being a racial jungle."[259]

In the 21st century Biden tried to separate himself from his previous racist statements on school integration: Template:Quotebox-float Biden led a coalition of segregationists that was opposed by Republican Sen. Edward Brooke the first African American senator elected since Democrats forced the end of Reconstruction after the Civil War. National Public Radio's David Ensor asked Biden "What about a constitutional amendment? Isn’t that what you’re gonna have to end up supporting if you want to stop court ordered busing too?" Biden responded Template:Quotebox-float Ensor reported that Biden proposed renewing segregation because busing "wasn't working" ("wasn't working" to the electoral advantage of Democrats and not necessarily to the cause of equal rights for Blacks) and Biden was afraid that older liberal colleagues were blind to how Black separatists felt about their children being bused to white schools. Template:Quotebox-float Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination based on race color or national origin in programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance.[260] Biden told the Philadelphia Enquirer on October 12 1975: Template:Quotebox-float George Wallace praised Biden as "one of the outstanding young politicians of America."[261] Wallace is famous for coining the slogan in a gubernatorial inaugural address Template:Quotebox-float The same year Biden authored an amendment to gut Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Politico writes of the whole sordid affair Template:Quotebox-float

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“I think the Democratic Party could stand a liberal George Wallace — someone who’s not afraid to stand up and offend people someone who wouldn’t pander but would say what the American people know in their gut is right” - Joe Biden

Sen. James Abourezk of South Dakota related how Biden reacted when Abrourezek tried to block the amendment: Template:Quotebox-float The New York Times published a lengthy story on Biden's advocacy of segregation. In a 1977 congressional hearing related to anti-desegregation orders Biden emphasized Template:Quotebox-float Republican Sen. Edward Brooke the first black senator ever to be popularly elected called Biden's amendment “the greatest symbolic defeat for civil rights since 1964.” Brooke accused Biden of leading an assault on integration.

Prof. Ronnie Dunn said opposition to busing was motivated by racism and that without the court-ordered policy Biden probably would not have become vice president in 2009. “What I find ironic is that [Biden] was the vice president under a president who if it hadn’t been for the social interaction that occurred during the era of busing I argue we likely would not have seen the election of Barack Obama." Dunn an Urban Studies professor at Cleveland State University and author of the book Boycotts Busing & Beyond said Biden made the case in favor of maintaining segregation. "That was an argument against desegregation.” Dunn said Biden must address the issue if he runs for president. “People have to be held accountable."[262]

Biden's opposition to integration didn't stop there. HuffPo reported:

File:Annotation 2019-07-05 135356.png
"That little girl was me." The Biden Amendment of 1975 to the 1965 Civil Rights Act restored funding for schools that practiced racial segregation. Democrat presidential contender Kamala Harris was ostracized and silenced after exposing Biden's corrupt and racist history.

Template:Quotebox-float In 1981 Biden said in a Senate hearing “sometimes even George Wallace is right about some things.” Wallace is famous for saying in 1963 “segregation now segregation tomorrow segregation forever.”[263] Biden read the "N" word into the Congressional Record during an open hearing in 1986.[264] In a farewell address to retiring Democrat segregationist Sen. John Stennis Biden said: Template:Quotebox-float When Biden announced his candidacy Politico attempted to poo-poo and explain away Biden and liberal Democrat racism with a back-handed slap at school vouchers for minority students which liberal elites have strenuously opposed ever since the Biden Amendment passed: Template:Quotebox-float Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey condemned the 2020 Democrat primary frontrunner at the Juneteenth annual commemoration of Republican Abraham Lincoln ending slavery in the United States. Template:Quotebox-float

Superpredators

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Biden colluded with segregationists to undermine the Supreme Court decision of Brown vs. Board.

In a 1993 Senate floor speech Biden warned of "predators on our streets" who were "beyond the pale" and said they must be cordoned off from the rest of society because the justice system did not know how to rehabilitate them. Biden described a Template:Quotebox-float Biden went on in the same breath Template:Quotebox-float Biden said that he didn't care "why someone is a malefactor in society" and that criminals needed to be "away from my mother your husband our families." Biden added "we should focus on them now" because "if we don't they will or a portion of them will become the predators 15 years from now."

Biden's comments echoed first lady Hillary Clinton's inflammatory statement about "Superpredators" with "no conscience no empathy" and "we need to bring them to heel."

Biden Crime Bill

Biden was a staunch opponent of school desegregation in the 1970s and leading crusader for mass incarceration in the 1980s and 1990s. Biden described African American felons in the aftermath of the Central Park 5 jogger case as 'predators' too sociopathic to rehabilitate [265] and white supremacist senators as his friends.

Biden boasts as one of his greatest legislative achievements passage of the 1994 Crime bill which locked up 10% of the Black adult male population of the United States.[266]

When President George H.W. Bush asked for a record increase in funding to fight the War on Drugs Biden told a TV interviewer

"In a nutshell the President's plan does not include enough police officers to catch the violent thugs enough prosecutors to convict them enough judges to sentence them or enough prison cells to put them away for a long time."[267][268]

File:1994 Superpredator Act.jpg
The Superpredator Act of 1994. Feinstein Kerry and Biden are clearly visible with President Clinton. The bill is known for its sentencing disparities which led to mass incarceration of Blacks.[269]

Biden Ted Kennedy and Strom Thurmond worked on proposals that raised maximum penalties removed a directive requiring the US Sentencing Commission to take into account prison capacity and created the cabinet-level “drug czar” position. In 1984 they passed the Comprehensive Crime Control Act which among other things abolished parole imposed a less generous cap on “good time” sentence reductions and allowed the Sentencing Commission to issue more punitive guidelines.

Biden bragged on the Senate floor that it was under his and Thurmond's leadership that Congress passed a law sending anyone caught with a rock of cocaine the size of a quarter to jail for a minimum of five years - the notoriously racist hundred-to-one sentencing disparity between crack and powder cocaine. In the same speech Biden took credit for civil asset forfeiture and seizure laws and demanded to know why Papa Bush hadn't sentenced more drug dealers to life in prison or exercise the death penalty once Congress had given him that power.[71]

Biden's version of a new crime bill added more than forty crimes that would be eligible for the death penalty. Biden boasted “we do everything but hang people for jaywalking.”[72] The NAACP and other groups lobbied against the bill.[270] Although the 1991 crime bill was defeated by Republicans the 1994 Biden/Clinton crime bill was passed.[271]

By 2001 the United States had the highest rate of incarceration in the world. Human Rights Watch reported that in seven states African Americans constituted 80 to 90 percent of all drug offenders even though they were no more likely than whites to use or sell illegal drugs. Prison admissions for drug offenses reached a level in 2000 for African Americans more than 26 times the level they had been under Ronald Reagan.[272] Biden's "social planning" had proven effective.

In May 2019 journalist and historian Shaun King observed

I’ve heard a very dangerous lie being told about how the systems of mass incarceration were built in this nation. I didn’t expect to have to respond this way because I didn’t expect Joe Biden to lie about the 1994 Crime Bill. He wrote it. He fought for it. And the results were devastating. Every single expert on this topic agrees.

This week Joe Biden took the stance that not only is he not sorry for the Crime Bill but that it didn’t even increase mass incarceration. And it’s shameful because either he’s willfully lying which is horrible or he’s just plain ignorant about the true impact of the bill which is also horrible. Either way I have a major problem with it because these laws are still in effect and they are doing damage in our communities every single day 24 hours a day.[273]

The Leftist Jacobin magazine summed up Biden's record: Template:Quotebox-float

Mass incarceration

Sen. Cory Booker told the NAACP convention in Detroit in response to another so-called "criminal justice reform" proposal by Biden: Template:Quotebox-float Biden now advocates for a man sentenced to prison to choose to be incarcerated in a women's prison.[274]

Anita Hill hearings

Biden as chair of the Judiciary Committee called for extended hearings to delay a vote on Thomas and accommodate her last-minute allegations with televised hearings that traumatized the country. Biden told Sen. Arlen Specter that “It was clear to me from the way she was answering the questions [Hill] was lying” about the central theme of her testimony. Biden used homophobia allegations by a Republican Senator that Anita Hill had "certain proclivities" to discredit her testimony to attack Hill's critics while at the same time fight the nomination of an uppity Black. Biden has been widely criticized for his racist sexist and bigotted handling of the hearings.[275][276]

Thomas said he would rather have been the victim of an assassin's bullet than suffer what the hearings did to him.[277] Democrats were outraged that a Republican president would nominate a conservative African-American role model for Black youths to the Supreme Court.

Hill described her private conversation with Joe Biden shortly before he entered the 2020 presidential election as "deeply unsatisfying."[278]

Flagship of the Confederacy

The Southern Manifesto was a document written after the landmark Supreme Court 1954 ruling Brown v. Board of Education which integrated public schools. It was drawn up by legislators in the United States Congress opposed to racial integration in public places. It was signed by politicians from the former Confederate States. All but twenty-eight of the 138 southern Democrat members of Congress signed the Manifesto including 19 of the Majority Democrat Senators.[279]

The Southern Manifesto was signed on a large mahogany conference table in Sen. John Stennis' office which Stennis used as his desk and referred to as "the flagship of the Confederacy." The table was used by segregationist and co0signer of the Southen Manifesto before Sen. Richard Russell before his retirement. When Stennis retired in 1988 Biden took over Stennis' office including the conference table. When Biden was elected vice president in 2008 Biden had the conference table moved into the vice president's residence.

Xenophobia

Biden told an audience in 2006

File:Riden with biden.png
Richard Spencer officially endorsed Joe Biden. Spencer organized the 2015 Neo-Nazi Charlottesville March and is one of the "fine people" Biden claims Trump praised.[280]

{{quotebox-float|"the country that isn't an erstwhile democracy where they have the greatest disparity and it's one of the wealthiest countries in the hemisphere. And because of a corrupt system that exists in Mexico there is the 1% of the population at the top a very small little middle class and the rest in abject poverty.

Folks I voted for a fence. I voted and unlike most Democrats - some of you won't like it - I voted for 700 miles of fence. Let me tell you we can build a fence 40 stories high - unless we change the dynamic in Mexico and you will you like this - and punish American employers who knowingly violate the law when in fact they hire illegals. Unless you do those two things all the rest is window dressing. Now I know I'm not supposed to say it that bluntly. But they are facts. They are the facts.

And so everything else we do is in between here everything else we do is at the margin. The reason why I thought parenthetically why I believe the fence is needed is not really related to immigration as much as drugs. I'm the guy who wrote the national crime bill. I'm the guy that wrote the national drug trafficing. I'm the guy who wrote the law that set up a drug czar. Let me tell you something folks. People are driving across that border with tons tons hear me tons of everything from by products for methamphetamine to cocaine to heroin. It's all coming up through corrupt Mexico.

So I would have as they say in the southern part of my state I had an altar call. I had a come to the Lord meeting. You think I'm joking? I'm not joking. Maybe you know about me. I've been doing this a long time. I've known every single major world leader in every country for the past 20 years. And I know a lot of them well...don't tell me in Mexico you expect to get the same kind of treatment that we give other democracies and then you don't act in a democratic way. Not on my watch. Not on my watch.Cite error: Closing </ref> missing for <ref> tag Biden declined Obama's first request to vet him for the vice presidential slot, fearing the vice presidency would represent a loss in status and voice from his Senate position, but subsequently changed his mind.[137][281] In a June 22, 2008, interview on NBC's Meet the Press, Biden confirmed that, although he was not actively seeking a spot on the ticket, he would accept the vice presidential nomination if offered.[282] In early August, Obama and Biden met in secret to discuss a possible vice-presidential relationship,[283] and the two hit it off well personally.[185] On August 22, 2008, Barack Obama announced that Biden would be his running mate.[284][285] The New York Times reported that the strategy behind the choice reflected a desire to fill out the ticket with someone who has foreign policy and national security experience—and not to help the ticket win a swing state or to emphasize Obama's "change" message.[286] Other observers pointed out Biden's appeal to middle class and blue-collar voters, as well as his willingness to aggressively challenge Republican nominee John McCain in a way that Obama seemed uncomfortable doing at times.[287][288] In accepting Obama's offer, Biden ruled out to him the possibility of running for president again in 2016[283] (although comments by Biden in subsequent years seemed to back off that stance, with Biden not wanting to diminish his political power by appearing uninterested in advancement).[289][290][291] Biden was officially nominated for vice president on August 27 by voice vote at the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado.[292]

After his selection as a vice presidential candidate, Biden was criticized by his own Roman Catholic Diocese of Wilmington Bishop Michael Saltarelli for not opposing abortion.[293] The diocese confirmed that even if elected vice president, Biden would not be allowed to speak at Catholic schools.[294] Biden was soon barred from receiving Holy Communion by the bishop of his original hometown of Scranton, Pennsylvania, because of his support for abortion rights;[295] however, Biden did continue to receive Communion at his local Delaware parish.[294] Scranton became a flash point in the competition for swing state Catholic voters between the Democratic campaign and liberal Catholic groups, who stressed that other social issues should be considered as much or more than abortion, and many bishops and conservative Catholics, who maintained abortion was paramount.[296] Biden said he believed that life began at conception but that he would not impose his personal religious views on others.[297] Bishop Saltarelli had previously stated regarding stances similar to Biden's: "No one today would accept this statement from any public servant: 'I am personally opposed to human slavery and racism but will not impose my personal conviction in the legislative arena.' Likewise, none of us should accept this statement from any public servant: 'I am personally opposed to abortion but will not impose my personal conviction in the legislative arena.'"[294]

File:Joe Biden nomination DNC 2008.jpg
Biden is nominated as the Democratic vice presidential candidate during the third night of the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado.

Biden's vice presidential campaigning gained little media visibility, as far greater press attention was focused on the Republican running mate, Alaskan Governor Sarah Palin.[162][298] During one week in September 2008, for instance, the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism found that Biden was included in only five percent of the news coverage of the race, far less than for the other three candidates on the tickets.[299] Biden nevertheless focused on campaigning in economically challenged areas of swing states and trying to win over blue-collar Democrats, especially those who had supported Hillary Clinton.[137][162] Biden attacked McCain heavily, despite a long-standing personal friendship;[nb 5] he would say, "That guy I used to know, he's gone. It literally saddens me."[162] As the financial crisis of 2007–2010 reached a peak with the liquidity crisis of September 2008 and the proposed bailout of the United States financial system became a major factor in the campaign, Biden voted in favor of the $700 billion Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, which passed the Senate 74–25.[301]

On October 2, 2008, Biden participated in the campaign's one vice presidential debate with Palin. Post-debate polls found that while Palin exceeded many voters' expectations, Biden had won the debate overall.[302] On October 5, Biden suspended campaign events for a few days after the death of his mother-in-law.[303] During the final days of the campaign, Biden focused on less-populated, older, less well-off areas of battleground states, especially in Florida, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, where polling indicated he was popular and where Obama had not campaigned or performed well in the Democratic primaries.[304][305][306] He also campaigned in some normally Republican states, as well as in areas with large Catholic populations.[306]

Under instructions from the Obama campaign, Biden kept his speeches succinct and tried to avoid off-hand remarks, such as one about Obama's being tested by a foreign power soon after taking office, which had attracted negative attention.[304][305] Privately, Obama was frustrated by Biden's remarks, saying "How many times is Biden gonna say something stupid?"[307] Obama campaign staffers referred to Biden blunders as "Joe bombs" and kept Biden uninformed about strategy discussions, which in turn irked Biden.[291] Relations between the two campaigns became strained for a month, until Biden apologized on a call to Obama and the two built a stronger partnership.[307] Publicly, Obama strategist David Axelrod said that any unexpected comments had been outweighed by Biden's high popularity ratings.[308] Nationally, Biden had a 60 percent favorability rating in a Pew Research Center poll, compared to Palin's 44 percent.[304]

On November 4, 2008, Obama was elected President and Biden was elected Vice President of the United States.[309] The Obama–Biden ticket won 365 Electoral College votes to McCain–Palin's 173,[310] and had a 53–46 percent edge in the nationwide popular vote.[311]

Biden had continued to run for his Senate seat as well as for Vice President,[312] as permitted by Delaware law.[144][nb 6] On November 4, Biden was also re-elected as senator, defeating Republican Christine O'Donnell.[313] Having won both races, Biden made a point of holding off his resignation from the Senate so that he could be sworn in for his seventh term on January 6, 2009.[314] He became the youngest senator ever to start a seventh full term, and said, "In all my life, the greatest honor bestowed upon me has been serving the people of Delaware as their United States senator."[314] Biden cast his last Senate vote on January 15, supporting the release of the second $350 billion for the Troubled Asset Relief Program.[315] Biden resigned from the Senate later that day;[nb 7] in emotional farewell remarks on the Senate floor, where he had spent most of his adult life, Biden said, "Every good thing I have seen happen here, every bold step taken in the 36-plus years I have been here, came not from the application of pressure by interest groups, but through the maturation of personal relationships."[319]

Vice Presidency (2009–2017)

Post-election transition

Vice President-elect Biden meets with Vice President Dick Cheney at Number One Observatory Circle on November 13, 2008

On November 4, 2008, Biden was elected Vice President of the United States as Obama's running mate.

Soon after the election, he was appointed chairman of President-elect Obama's transition team. During the transition phase of the Obama administration, Biden said he was in daily meetings with Obama and that McCain was still his friend.[320] The U.S. Secret Service codename given to Biden is "Celtic", referencing his Irish roots.[321]

Biden chose veteran Democratic lawyer and aide Ron Klain to be his chief of staff,[322] and Time Washington bureau chief Jay Carney to be his director of communications.[323] Biden intended to eliminate some of the explicit roles assumed by the vice presidency of his predecessor, Dick Cheney,[324] who had established himself as an autonomous power center.[137] Otherwise, Biden said he would not emulate any previous vice presidency, but would instead seek to provide advice and counsel on every critical decision Obama would make.[325] Biden said he was closely involved in all the cabinet appointments that were made during the transition.[325] Biden was also named to head the new White House Task Force on Working Families, an initiative aimed at improving the economic well being of the middle class.[326] In his last act as Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, Biden went on a trip to Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan during the second week of January 2009, meeting with the leadership of those countries.[327]

First term (2009–2013)

File:Joe Biden sworn in 1-20-09 hires 090120-N-0696M-204a.jpg
Biden is sworn into office by Associate Justice John Paul Stevens, January 20, 2009

On January 20, 2009, at noon, Biden became the 47th Vice President of the United States, sworn into the office by Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens.[328] Biden is the first United States Vice President from Delaware[329] and the first Roman Catholic to attain that office.[330]

File:Barack Obama Walking With Joe Biden.jpg
President Obama walking with Vice President Biden at the White House, February 2009

In the early months of the Obama administration, Biden assumed the role of an important behind-the-scenes counselor.[331] One role was to adjudicate disputes between Obama's "team of rivals".[137] The president compared Biden's efforts to a basketball player "who does a bunch of things that don't show up in the stat sheet".[331] Biden played a key role in gaining Senate support for several major pieces of Obama legislation, and was a main factor in convincing Senator Arlen Specter to switch from the Republican to the Democratic party.[332] Biden lost an internal debate to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton regarding his opposition to sending 21,000 new troops to the war in Afghanistan.[333][334] His skeptical voice was still considered valuable within the administration,[281] however, and later in 2009 Biden's views achieved more prominence within the White House as Obama reconsidered his Afghanistan strategy.[335]

Biden made visits to Iraq about once every two months,[137] including trips to Baghdad in August and September 2009 to listen to Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and reiterate U.S. stances on Iraq's future;[336] by this time he had become the administration's point man in delivering messages to Iraqi leadership about expected progress in the country.[281] More generally, overseeing Iraq policy became Biden's responsibility: the president is said to have put it as "Joe, you do Iraq".[337] Biden said Iraq "could be one of the great achievements of this administration".[338] Biden's January 2010 visit to Iraq in the midst of turmoil over banned candidates from the upcoming Iraqi parliamentary election resulted in 59 of the several hundred candidates being reinstated by the Iraqi government two days later.[339] By 2012, Biden had made eight trips there, but his oversight of U.S. policy in Iraq receded with the exit in 2011 of U.S. troops.[340][341]

Biden was also in charge of the oversight role for infrastructure spending from the Obama stimulus package intended to help counteract the ongoing recession, and stressed that only worthy projects should get funding.[342] He talked with hundreds of governors, mayors, and other local officials in this role.[340] During this period, Biden was satisfied that no major instances of waste or corruption had occurred,[281] and when he completed that role in February 2011, he said that the number of fraud incidents with stimulus monies had been less than one percent.[343]

Biden, Obama and the U.S. national security team gathered in the White House Situation Room to monitor the progress of the May 2011 U.S. mission to kill Osama bin Laden.

It took some time for the cautious Obama and the blunt, rambling Biden to work out ways of dealing with each other.[291] In late April 2009, Biden's off-message response to a question during the beginning of the swine flu outbreak, that he would advise family members against travelling on airplanes or subways, led to a swift retraction from the White House.[344] The remark revived Biden's reputation for gaffes,[345] and led to a spate of late-night television jokes themed on him being a loose-talking buffoon.[335][346][347] In the face of persistently rising unemployment through July 2009, Biden acknowledged that the administration had "misread how bad the economy was" but maintained confidence that the stimulus package would create many more jobs once the pace of expenditures picked up.[348] The same month, Secretary of State Clinton quickly disavowed Biden's remarks disparaging Russia as a power, but despite any missteps, Biden still retained Obama's confidence and was increasingly influential within the administration.[349] On March 23, 2010, a microphone picked up Biden telling the president that his signing of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was "a big ... deal", using an adjective beginning with "f", during live national news telecasts. White House press secretary Robert Gibbs replied via Twitter "And yes Mr. Vice President, you're right ..."[350] Despite their different personalities, Obama and Biden formed a friendship, partly based around Obama's daughter Sasha and Biden's granddaughter Maisy, who attended Sidwell Friends School together.[291]

Biden's most important role within the administration was to question assumptions, playing a contrarian role.[137][335] Obama said that "The best thing about Joe is that when we get everybody together, he really forces people to think and defend their positions, to look at things from every angle, and that is very valuable for me."[281] Another senior Obama advisor said Biden "is always prepared to be the skunk at the family picnic to make sure we are as intellectually honest as possible".[281] On June 11, 2010, Biden represented the United States at the opening ceremony of the World Cup, attended the England v. U.S. game which was tied 1–1, and visited Egypt, Kenya, and South Africa.[351] Throughout, Joe and Jill Biden maintained a relaxed atmosphere at their official residence in Washington, often entertaining some of their grandchildren, and regularly returned to their home in Delaware.[352]

Biden campaigned heavily for Democrats in the 2010 midterm elections, maintaining an attitude of optimism in the face of general predictions of large-scale losses for the party.[353] Following large-scale Republican gains in the elections and the departure of White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, Biden's past relationships with Republicans in Congress became more important.[354][355] He led the successful administration effort to gain Senate approval for the New START treaty.[354][355] In December 2010, Biden's advocacy within the White House for a middle ground, followed by his direct negotiations with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, were instrumental in producing the administration's compromise tax package that revolved around a temporary extension of the Bush tax cuts.[355][356] Biden then took the lead in trying to sell the agreement to a reluctant Democratic caucus in Congress,[355][357] which was passed as the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010.

In foreign policy, Biden supported the NATO-led military intervention in Libya in 2011.[358] Biden has supported closer economic ties with Russia.[359]

In March 2011, Obama detailed Biden to lead negotiations between both houses of Congress and the White House in resolving federal spending levels for the rest of the year, and avoiding a government shutdown.[360] By May 2011, a "Biden panel" with six congressional members was trying to reach a bipartisan deal on raising the U.S. debt ceiling as part of an overall deficit reduction plan.[361][362] The U.S. debt ceiling crisis developed over the next couple of months, but it was again Biden's relationship with McConnell that proved to be a key factor in breaking a deadlock and finally bringing about a bipartisan deal to resolve it, in the form of the Budget Control Act of 2011, signed on August 2, 2011, the same day that an unprecedented U.S. default had loomed.[363][364][365] Biden had spent the most time bargaining with Congress on the debt question of anyone in the administration,[364] and one Republican staffer said, "Biden's the only guy with real negotiating authority, and [McConnell] knows that his word is good. He was a key to the deal."[363]

It has been reported that Biden was opposed to going forward with the May 2011 U.S. mission to kill Osama bin Laden,[340][366] lest failure adversely affect Obama's chances for a second term.[367][368] He took the lead in notifying Congressional leaders of the successful outcome.[369]

2012 re-election campaign

In October 2010, Biden stated that Obama had asked him to remain as his running mate for the 2012 presidential election.[353] With Obama's popularity on the decline, however, in late 2011 White House Chief of Staff William M. Daley conducted some secret polling and focus group research into the idea of Secretary of State Clinton replacing Biden on the ticket.[370] The notion was dropped when the results showed no appreciable improvement for Obama,[370] and White House officials later said that Obama had never entertained the idea.[371]

Biden's May 2012 statement that he was "absolutely comfortable" with same-sex marriage gained considerable public attention in comparison to President Obama's position, which had been described as "evolving".[372] Biden made his statement without administration consent, and Obama and his aides were quite irked, since Obama had planned to shift position several months later, in the build-up to the party convention, and since Biden had previously counseled the president to avoid the issue lest key Catholic voters be offended.[291][373][374][375] Gay rights advocates seized upon the Biden stance,[373] and within days, Obama announced that he too supported same-sex marriage, an action in part forced by Biden's unexpected remarks.[376] Biden apologized to Obama in private for having spoken out,[374][377] while Obama acknowledged publicly it had been done from the heart.[373] The incident showed that Biden still struggled at times with message discipline;[291] as Time wrote, "everyone knows [that] Biden's greatest strength is also his greatest weakness."[340] Relations were also strained between the campaigns when Biden appeared to use his to bolster fundraising contacts for a possible run on his own in the 2016 presidential election, and the vice president ended up being excluded from Obama campaign strategy meetings.[370]

Biden with President Barack Obama, July 2012

The Obama campaign nevertheless still valued Biden as a retail-level politician who could connect with disaffected, blue collar workers and rural residents, and he had a heavy schedule of appearances in swing states as the Obama re-election campaign began in earnest in spring 2012.[112][340] An August 2012 remark before a mixed-race audience that proposed Republican relaxation of Wall Street regulations would "put y'all back in chains" led to a similar analysis of Biden's face-to-face campaigning abilities versus tendency to go off track.[112][378][379] The Los Angeles Times wrote, "Most candidates give the same stump speech over and over, putting reporters if not the audience to sleep. But during any Biden speech, there might be a dozen moments to make press handlers cringe, and prompt reporters to turn to each other with amusement and confusion."[378] Time magazine wrote that Biden often goes too far and that "Along with the familiar Washington mix of neediness and overconfidence, Biden's brain is wired for more than the usual amount of goofiness."[112]

Biden was officially nominated for a second term as vice president on September 6 by voice vote at the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina.[380] He faced his Republican counterpart, Representative Paul Ryan, in the lone 2012 vice presidential debate on October 11 in Danville, Kentucky. There he made a feisty, emotional defense of the Obama administration's record and energetically attacked the Republican ticket, in an effort to regain campaign momentum lost by Obama's unfocused debate performance against Republican nominee Mitt Romney the week before.[381][382]

On November 6, 2012, the president and vice president were elected to second terms.[383] The Obama–Biden ticket won 332 Electoral College votes to Romney–Ryan's 206 and had a 51–47 percent edge in the nationwide popular vote.[384]

Post-election

In December 2012, Biden was named by Obama to head the Gun Violence Task Force, created to address the causes of gun violence in the United States in the aftermath of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting.[385] Later that month, during the final days before the country fell off the "fiscal cliff", Biden's relationship with McConnell once more proved important as the two negotiated a deal that led to the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 being passed at the start of 2013.[386][387] It made permanent much of the Bush tax cuts but raised rates on upper income levels.[387]

Second term (2013–2017)

Biden was inaugurated to a second term in the early morning of January 20, 2013, at a small ceremony in his official residence with Justice Sonia Sotomayor presiding (a public ceremony took place on January 21).[388] He continued to be in the forefront as, in the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, the Obama administration put forth executive orders and proposed legislation towards new gun control measures[117] (the legislation failed to pass).[389]

During the discussions that led to the October 2013 passage of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014, which resolved the U.S. federal government shutdown of 2013 and the U.S. debt-ceiling crisis of 2013, Biden played little role. This was due to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and other Democratic leaders cutting the vice president out of any direct talks with Congress, feeling that Biden had given too much away during previous negotiations.[390][391][392]

File:Joe Biden & Ahmet Davutoğlu.jpg
Biden meeting Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu, December 31, 2014. Biden said that Kurdish PKK is a "terrorist group"[393]

Biden's Violence Against Women Act was reauthorized again in 2013. The act led to further related developments in the creation of the White House Council on Women and Girls, begun in the first term, as well as the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault, begun in January 2014 with Biden as co-chair along with Jarrett.[394][395] Biden has a strong stance on sexual assault.[396] For example, Biden stated to a victim of sexual assault at Stanford University, "you did it ... in the hope that your strength might prevent this crime from happening to someone else. Your bravery is breathtaking."[396] He has also taken legality into the situation. Biden issued federal guidelines while presenting a speech at the University of New Hampshire. He stated that "No means no, if you're drunk or you're sober. No means no if you're in bed, in a dorm or on the street. No means no even if you said yes at first and you changed your mind. No means no."[397][398][399]

Biden favored arming Syria's rebel fighters.[400] As Iraq fell apart during 2014, renewed attention was paid to the Biden-Gelb Iraqi federalization plan of 2006, with some observers suggesting that Biden had been right all along.[401][402] Biden himself said that the U.S. would follow ISIL "to the gates of hell".[403] In October 2014, Biden said that Turkey, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates had "poured hundreds of millions of dollars and tens of thousands of tons of weapons into anyone who would fight against Al-Assad, except that the people who were being supplied were al-Nusra, and al Qaeda, and the extremist elements of jihadis coming from other parts of the world."[404]

File:Vice President Joe Biden visit to Israel March 2016 (25554709411).jpg
Biden with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Jerusalem, March 9, 2016. Biden is a staunch supporter of Israel.

By 2015, a series of swearings-in and other events where Biden placed his hands on women and girls and talked closely to them had attracted the attention of both the press and social media.[405][406][407][408] In one case, a senator issued a statement afterward saying about his daughter, "No, she doesn't think the vice president is creepy."[409] On January 17, 2015, Secret Service agents heard shots were fired as a vehicle drove near Biden's Delaware residence at 8:28 p.m. outside the security perimeter, but the vice president and his wife Jill were not home. A vehicle was observed by an agent leaving the scene at a high rate of speed.[410]

On December 8, 2015, Biden spoke in Ukraine's parliament in Kiev[411][412] in one of his many visits to set USA aid and policy stance for Ukraine.[413] On February 28, 2016, Biden gave a speech at the 88th Academy Awards to do with awareness for sexual assault; he also introduced Lady Gaga.

On December 8, 2016, Biden went to Ottawa to meet with the Prime Minister of Canada, Justin Trudeau.[414]

During his two full terms, Joe Biden never cast a tie-breaking vote in the Senate, making him the longest serving Vice President with this distinction.

Death of Beau Biden

On May 30, 2015, Biden's son, Beau Biden, died at age 46 after having battled brain cancer for several years. In a statement, the Vice President's office said, "The entire Biden family is saddened beyond words."[415] The nature and seriousness of the illness had not been previously disclosed to the public, and Biden had quietly reduced his public schedule in order to spend more time with his son. At the time of his death, Beau Biden had been widely seen as the frontrunner to be the Democratic nominee for Governor of Delaware in 2016.[416][417]

Role in the 2016 presidential campaign

During much of his second term, Biden was said to be preparing for a possible bid for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination.[418] At age 74 on Inauguration Day in January 2017, he would have been the oldest president on inauguration in history.[419] With his family, many friends, and donors encouraging him in mid-2015 to enter the race, and with Hillary Clinton's favorability ratings in decline at that time, Biden was reported to again be seriously considering the prospect and a "Draft Biden 2016" PAC was established.[418][420][421]

As of September 11, 2015, Biden was still uncertain whether or not to run. Biden cited the recent death of his son being a large drain on his emotional energy, and that "nobody has a right ... to seek that office unless they're willing to give it 110% of who they are".[422]

On October 21, speaking from a podium in the Rose Garden with his wife and President Obama by his side, Biden announced his decision not to enter the race for the Democratic presidential nomination in the 2016 election.[423][424][425] In January 2016, Biden affirmed that not running was the right decision, but admitted to regretting not running for President "every day."[426][427]

As of the end of January 2016, neither Biden nor President Barack Obama had endorsed any candidate in the 2016 presidential election. Biden did miss his annual Thanksgiving tradition of going to Nantucket, opting instead to travel abroad and meet with several European leaders. He took time to meet with Martin O'Malley, having previously met with Bernie Sanders, both 2016 candidates. Neither of these meetings was considered an endorsement, as Biden had said that he would meet with any candidate who asked.[428]

Biden meeting with Vice President–elect Mike Pence on November 10, 2016

After Obama endorsed Hillary Clinton on June 9, 2016, Biden endorsed her later the same day.[429] Though Biden and Clinton were scheduled to campaign together in Scranton on July 8, the appearance was canceled by Clinton in light of the shooting of Dallas police officers the previous day.[430]

Following his endorsement of Clinton, Biden publicly displayed his disagreements with the policies of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. On June 20, Biden critiqued Trump's proposal to temporarily ban Muslims from entering the country as well as his stated intent to build a wall between the United States and Mexico border, furthering that Trump's suggestion to either torture and or kill family members of terrorists was both damaging to American values and "deeply damaging to our security".[431] During an interview with George Stephanopoulos at the 2016 Democratic National Convention on July 26, Biden asserted that "moral and centered" voters would not vote for Trump.[432] On October 21, the anniversary of his choice to not run, Biden said he wished he was still in high school so he could take Trump "behind the gym".[433] On October 24, Biden clarified he would only have fought Trump if he was still in high school,[434] and the following day, October 25, Trump responded that he would "love that".[435]

Post–Vice Presidency (2017–present)

File:Vice President Joe Biden Doug Jones.jpg
Biden campaigning for Alabama U.S. Senate candidate Doug Jones in October 2017

In 2017, Biden was named the Benjamin Franklin Presidential Practice professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he intended to focus on foreign policy, diplomacy, and national security while leading the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement.[436] He also wanted to pursue his "cancer moonshot" agenda,[437] calling the fight against cancer "the only bipartisan thing left in America" in March 2017.[438]

Biden had been close friends with Sen. John McCain for over 30 years. In 2018, Sen. McCain died at the age of 81 after dealing with the same cancer that Joe Biden's late son Beau Biden died of. Biden gave the eulogy at McCain's funeral service in Phoenix, Arizona. He opened with "My name's Joe Biden. I'm a Democrat. And I loved John McCain.",[439] he also called him a "brother".[439] Biden also served as a pallbearer at Sen. McCain's memorial service at the Washington National Cathedral alongside Warren Beatty, and Michael Bloomberg.[440]

Comments on President Trump

While attending the launch of the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement on March 30, 2017, a student asked Biden what "piece of advice" he would give to President Trump, Biden responding that the president should grow up and cease his tweeting so he could focus on the office.[441] During a speech at a May 29, 2017 gathering of Philip D. Murphy supporters at a community center gymnasium, Biden said, "There are a lot of people out there who are frightened. Trump played on their fears. What we haven't done, in my view—and this is a criticism of all us—we haven't spoken enough to the fears and aspirations of the people we come from."[442] On June 17, 2017, Biden predicted the "state the nation is today will not be sustained by the American people" while speaking at a Florida Democratic Party fundraiser in Hollywood.[443] Biden told CBS This Morning that Trump's administration "seems to feel the need to coddle autocrats and dictators" like Saudi Arabian leaders, Russian President Putin, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un or Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte.[444] In October 2018, Biden said if Democrats retake the House of Representatives, "I hope they don't [impeach Trump]. I don't think there's a basis for doing that right now."[445]

Climate change

During an appearance at the Brainstorm Health Conference in San Diego, California on May 2, 2017, Biden said the public "has moved ahead of the administration [on science]".[446] On May 31, Biden tweeted that climate change was an "existential threat to our future" and remaining in the Paris Agreement was the "best way to protect our children and global leadership."[447] The following day, after President Trump announced his withdrawal of the US from the Paris Agreement, Biden tweeted that the choice "imperils US security and our ability to own the clean energy future."[448] While appearing at the Concordia Europe Summit in Athens, Greece on June 7, Biden said, referring to the Paris Agreement, "The vast majority of the American people do not agree with the decision the president made."[449]

Healthcare

On March 22, 2017, Biden referred to the Republican healthcare bill as a "tax bill" meant to transfer nearly US$1 trillion used for health benefits for the lower classes to wealthy Americans during his first appearance on Capitol Hill since Trump's inauguration.[450] On May 4, after the House of Representatives narrowly voted for the American Health Care Act, Biden tweeted that it was a "Day of shame for Congress", lamenting the loss of pre-existing condition protections.[451] On June 24, in response to Senate Republicans revealing an American Health Care Act draft the previous day, Biden tweeted that the bill "isn't about health care at all—it's a wealth transfer: slashes care to fund tax cuts for the wealthy & corporations".[452] On July 28, in response to the Republican Senate healthcare bill falling through, Biden tweeted, "Thank you to everyone who tirelessly worked to protect the healthcare of millions."[453]

Immigration

On September 5, 2017, after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that the Trump Administration is rescinding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, Biden tweeted, "Brought by parents, these children had no choice in coming here. Now they'll be sent to countries they've never known. Cruel. Not America."[454]

LGBT rights

On April 14, 2017, Biden released a statement both denouncing Chechnya authorities for their rounding up, torturing, and murdering of "individuals who are believed to be gay" and stating his hope that the Trump administration honor a prior pledge to advance human rights by confronting Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov and Russian leaders over "these egregious violations of human rights".[455] On June 21, during a speech at a Democratic National Committee LGBT gala in New York City, Biden said, "Hold President Trump accountable for his pledge to be your friend."[456]

On July 26, 2017, after Trump announced a ban of transgender people serving in the military, Biden tweeted, "Every patriotic American who is qualified to serve in our military should be able to serve. Full stop."[457]

2020 presidential campaign

During a tour of the U.S. Senate with reporters before leaving office, on December 5, 2016, Biden refused to rule out a bid for the presidency in the 2020 presidential election, after leaving office as Vice President. If he were to run in 2020, Biden would be 77 years old on election day and 78 on inauguration day in 2021.[458][459][460] He reasserted his ambivalence about running on an appearance of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert on December 7, in which he stated "never say never" about running for President in 2020, while also acknowledging that he did not see a scenario in which he would run for office again.[461][462] He seemingly announced on January 13, 2017, exactly one week prior to the expiration of his vice presidential term, that he would not run.[463] He then appeared to backtrack four days later, on January 17, stating "I'll run if I can walk."[464] A political action committee known as Time for Biden was formed in January 2018, seeking Biden's entry into the race.[465][466]

Between 2016 and 2019, Biden was mentioned by various media outlets as a potential candidate. He told a forum held in Bogota, Colombia, on July 17, 2018, that he would decide whether or not to formally declare as a candidate by January 2019.[467] On February 4, 2019, with no decision having been forthcoming from Biden, Edward-Isaac Dovere of The Atlantic wrote that Biden was "very close to saying yes" but that some close to him are worried he would have a last-minute change of heart, as he did in 2016.[468] Dovere reported that Biden was concerned about the effect another presidential run could have on his family and reputation, as well as fundraising struggles and perceptions about his age and relative centrism, compared to other declared and potential candidates.[468] Conversely, his "sense of duty," offense at the Trump presidency, the lack of foreign policy experience amongst other Democratic hopefuls and his desire to foster "bridge-building progressivism" in the Party, were said to be factors prompting him to run.[468] In March 2019, he indicated he may run,[469] and ultimately launched his campaign on April 25, 2019.[470] In May 2019, Biden chose Philadelphia to be his 2020 U.S. presidential campaign headquarters.[471]

Allegations of inappropriate physical contact

There have been multiple photographs of Biden engaged in what commentators considered to be inappropriate proximity to women and children, including kissing and or touching.[472][473][474] Biden has described himself as a "tactile politician" and admitted that this behavior has caused trouble for him in the past.[475] An image of Biden in close proximity to Stephanie Carter during her husband's swearing in as Secretary of Defense in 2015 resulted in a mocking epithet that was widely repeated. Carter defended Biden's depicted behavior in a 2019 interview.[476]

In March 2019, former Nevada assemblywoman Lucy Flores alleged that Biden kissed her without her consent at a 2014 campaign rally in Las Vegas. In a New York magazine op-ed for The Cut, Flores wrote that Biden had walked up behind her, put his hands on her shoulders, smelled her hair, and kissed the back of her head. Adding that the way he touched her was "an intimate way reserved for close friends, family, or romantic partners – and I felt powerless to do anything about it."[477] In an interview with HuffPost, Flores stated she believed Biden's behavior to be disqualifying for a 2020 presidential run.[478] Biden's spokesman stated that Biden did not recall the behavior described.[479] Two days after Flores, Amy Lappos, a former congressional aide to Jim Himes, said Biden crossed a line of decency and respect when he touched her in a non-sexual, but inappropriate way by holding her head to rub noses with her at a political fundraiser in Greenwich in 2009.[480] The next day, two additional women came forward with allegations of inappropriate conduct. One woman said that Biden placed his hand on her thigh, and the other said he ran his hand from her shoulder down her back.[481][482]

By early April 2019, a total of seven women had made allegations of inappropriate physical contact regarding Biden.[483] At a conference on April 5, Biden apologized for not understanding how individuals would react to his actions, but stated that his intentions were honorable; he went on to say that he was not sorry for anything that he had ever done, which led critics to accuse him of sending a mixed message.[484] He also proclaimed—with each public embrace he gave during the event—that he had received permission for it. Some critics interpreted this as Biden jokingly deflecting criticism, while other observers considered his change in tone responsive to the criticisms received.[485]

Political positions

Joe Biden's ratings from advocacy organizations
Group Advocacy issue(s) Ratings
Lifetime Recent[486]
Rating Date
AFL–CIO labor unions 85%[487] 85% 2007
APHA public health 100% 2003
CTJ progressive taxation 100% 2006
NAACP minorities & affirmative action 100% 2006
LCV environmental protection 83%[488] 64%[488] 2008
NEA public education 91% 2003
ARA senior citizens 89% 2003
CAF energy security 83% 2006
PA peace and disarmament 80% 2003
HRC gay and lesbian rights 78% 2006
NARAL abortion rights ~72%[489] 75%[490] 2007
CURE criminal rehabilitation 71% 2000
ACLU civil and political rights 80%[491] 91%[492] 2007
Cato free trade and libertarianism 42% 2002
US CoC corporate interests 32% 2003
CCA Christian family values 16% 2003
NTU lowering taxes 2%[493] 2008
NRLC restrictions on abortion 0% 2006
NRA gun ownership F 2003

Biden has been characterized as a moderate Democrat.[494] He has supported deficit spending for fiscal stimulus in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009;[495][496] the increased infrastructure spending proposed by the Obama administration;[496] mass transit, including Amtrak, bus, and subway subsidies;[497] same-sex marriage;[498] and the reduced military spending proposed in the Obama Administration's fiscal year 2014 budget.[499][500]

A method that political scientists use for gauging ideology is to compare the annual ratings by the Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) with the ratings by the American Conservative Union (ACU).[501] Biden has a lifetime liberal 72 percent score from the ADA through 2004, while the ACU awarded Biden a lifetime conservative rating of 13 percent through 2008.[502] Using another metric, Biden has a lifetime average liberal score of 77.5 percent, according to a National Journal analysis that places him ideologically among the center of Senate Democrats as of 2008.[503] The Almanac of American Politics rates congressional votes as liberal or conservative on the political spectrum, in three policy areas: economic, social, and foreign. For 2005–2006, Biden's average ratings were as follows: the economic rating was 80 percent liberal and 13 percent conservative, the social rating was 78 percent liberal and 18 percent conservative, and the foreign rating was 71 percent liberal and 25 percent conservative.[504] This has not changed much over time; his liberal ratings in the mid-1980s were also in the 70–80 percent range.[61]

Various advocacy groups have given Biden scores or grades as to how well his votes align with the positions of each group. The American Civil Liberties Union gives him an 80 percent lifetime score,[491] with a 91 percent score for the 110th Congress.[492] Biden opposes drilling for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and supports governmental funding to find new energy sources.[505] Biden believes action must be taken on global warming. He co-sponsored the Sense of the Senate resolution calling on the United States to be a part of the United Nations climate negotiations and the Boxer–Sanders Global Warming Pollution Reduction Act, the most stringent climate bill in the United States Senate.[506] Biden was given an 85 percent lifetime approval rating from the AFL–CIO,[487] and he voted for the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).[507]

Distinctions

Biden has received honorary degrees from the University of Scranton (1976),[508] Saint Joseph's University (LL.D 1981),[509] Widener University School of Law (2000),[150] Emerson College (2003),[510] his alma mater the University of Delaware (2004),[511] Suffolk University Law School (2005),[512] and his other alma mater Syracuse University (LL.D 2009) [513] University of Pennsylvania (LL.D 2013) [514] Miami Dade College (2014) [515] Trinity College, Dublin (LL.D 2016) [516] Colby College (LL.D 2017) [517] Morgan State University (DPS 2017) [518] University of South Carolina (DPA 2017) [519]

File:Joe Biden Receives Presidential Medal of Freedom.jpg
President Barack Obama presents Vice President Joe Biden with the Presidential Medal of Freedom with Distinction during a tribute to the Vice President in the State Dining Room of the White House, January 12, 2017.

Biden also received the Chancellor Medal from his alma mater, Syracuse University, in 1980,[520] and in 2005, he received the George Arents Pioneer Medal—Syracuse's highest alumni award[520]—"for excellence in public affairs."[521]

In 2008, Biden received the Best of Congress Award, for "improving the American quality of life through family-friendly work policies", from Working Mother magazine.[522] Also in 2008, Biden shared with fellow Senator Richard Lugar the Hilal-i-Pakistan award from the Government of Pakistan "in recognition of their consistent support for Pakistan".[523] In 2009, Biden received the Golden Medal of Freedom award from Kosovo, that region's highest award, for his vocal support for their independence in the late 1990s.[524]

Biden is an inductee of the Delaware Volunteer Firemen's Association Hall of Fame.[525] He was named to the Little League Hall of Excellence in 2009.[526]

On June 25, 2016, Joe Biden received the freedom of County Louth in the Republic of Ireland.[527]

On January 12, 2017, Obama surprised Biden by awarding him the Presidential Medal of Freedom with Distinction during a farewell press conference at the White House honoring Biden and his wife. Obama said he was awarding the Medal of Freedom to Biden for "faith in your fellow Americans, for your love of country and a lifetime of service that will endure through the generations".[528][529] It was the first and only time Obama awarded the Medal of Freedom with the additional honor of distinction, an honor which his three predecessors had reserved only for President Ronald Reagan, Colin Powell and Pope John Paul II, respectively.[530]

On December 11, 2018, the University of Delaware renamed their School of Public Policy and Administration after Biden, naming it the Joseph R. Biden, Jr. School of Public Policy and Administration, which also houses the Biden Institute.[531]

Electoral history

Election results
Year Office Election Votes for Biden % Opponent Party Votes %
1970 County Councilman General 10,573 55% Lawrence T. Messick Republican 8,192 43%
1972 U.S. Senator General 116,006 50% J. Caleb Boggs Republican 112,844 49%
1978 General 93,930 58% James H. Baxter Jr. Republican 66,479 41%
1984 General 147,831 60% John M. Burris Republican 98,101 40%
1990 General 112,918 63% M. Jane Brady Republican 64,554 36%
1996 General 165,465 60% Raymond J. Clatworthy Republican 105,088 38%
2002 General 135,253 58% Raymond J. Clatworthy Republican 94,793 41%
2008 General 257,484 65% Christine O'Donnell Republican 140,584 35%
2008 Vice President General 69,498,516
(365 electoral votes)
53%
(270 needed)
Sarah Palin Republican 59,948,323
(173 electoral votes)
46%
---
2012 General 65,915,796
(332 electoral votes)
51%
(270 needed)
Paul Ryan Republican 60,933,500
(206 electoral votes)
47%
---

Writings by Biden

Notes

  1. Biden has on at least two occasions alleged that the truck driver was under the influence of alcohol, but this was not the case.[43][44]
  2. Biden chose not to run for president in 1992 in part because he had voted against the resolution authorizing the Gulf War.[144] He considered joining the Democratic field of candidates for the 2004 presidential race but in August 2003 decided otherwise, saying he did not have enough time and any attempt would be too much of a long shot.[166] Around 2004, Biden was also widely discussed as a possible Secretary of State in a Democratic administration.[167]
  3. Several linguists and political analysts stated that the correct transcription includes a comma after the word "African-American", which one said "would significantly change the meaning (and the degree of offensiveness) of Biden's comment".[178]
  4. The Indian-American activist who was on the receiving end of Biden's comment stated that he was "100 percent behind [Biden] because he did nothing wrong."[181]
  5. Biden admired McCain politically as well as personally; in May 2004, he had urged McCain to run as vice president with presumptive Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry, saying the cross-party ticket would help heal the "vicious rift" in U.S. politics.[300]
  6. Biden was the fourth person to run for Vice President and reelection to the Senate simultaneously after Lyndon Johnson, Lloyd Bentsen, and Joe Lieberman, and the second to have won both elections after Johnson.
  7. Delaware's Democratic governor, Ruth Ann Minner, announced on November 24, 2008, that she would appoint Biden's longtime senior adviser Ted Kaufman to succeed Biden in the Senate.[316] Kaufman said he would only serve two years, until Delaware's special Senate election in 2010.[316] Biden's son Beau ruled himself out of the 2008 selection process due to his impending tour in Iraq with the Delaware Army National Guard.[317] He was a possible candidate for the 2010 special election, but in early 2010 said he would not run for the seat.[318]

References

Footnotes

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  2. Chase, Randall (January 9, 2010). "Vice President Biden's mother, Jean, dies at 92". WITN-TV. Associated Press.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. "Joseph Biden Sr., 86, father of the senator" (fee required). The Philadelphia Inquirer. September 3, 2002. p. B4.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. Witcover, Joe Biden, p. 9.
  5. Smolenyak, Megan (July 2, 2012). "Joe Biden's Irish Roots". Huffington Post. Retrieved December 6, 2012.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. "Number two Biden has a history over Irish debate". The Belfast Telegraph. November 9, 2008. Retrieved January 22, 2008.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. 7.0 7.1 Witcover, Joe Biden, p. 8.
  8. Smolenyak, Megan (April–May 2013). "Joey From Scranton – Vice President Biden's Irish Roots". Irish America.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. Gehman, Geoff (May 3, 2012). "Vice President Joe Biden Discusses American Innovation". Lafayette College. Archived from the original on February 2, 2014. Unknown parameter |deadurl= ignored (help)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. Krawczeniuk, Borys (August 24, 2008). "Remembering his roots". The Times-Tribune. Archived from the original on April 6, 2009. Retrieved January 21, 2009. Unknown parameter |deadurl= ignored (help)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
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  13. 13.00 13.01 13.02 13.03 13.04 13.05 13.06 13.07 13.08 13.09 13.10 13.11 13.12 13.13 Almanac of American Politics 2008, p. 364.
  14. Witcover, Joe Biden, pp. 27, 32.
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  21. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named coxns-jill
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  46. Witcover, Joe Biden, p. 96.
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Books

External links